Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KDE: A Frank Look at Simon: Where To Go From Here

Filed under
KDE

As I had previously announced, I am resigning my active positions in Simon and KDE Speech.

As part of me handing over the project to an eventual successor, I had announced a day-long workshop on speech recognition basics for anyone who’s interested. Mario Fux of Randa fame took me up on that offer. In a long and intense Jitsi meeting we discussed basic theory, went through all the processes involved in creating and adapting language- and acoustic models and looked at the Simon codebase. But maybe most importantly of all, we talked about what I also want to outline in this blog post: What Simon is, what it could and should be, and how to get there.

Read more

Critical Intel Graphics Driver Bug Puts KDE Plasma 5 in a Really Bad Light

Filed under
KDE

On August 5, Martin Sandsmark informed us all that there's a critical bug in the Intel graphics stack leading to a huge number of crashes for all users of the latest KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

Read more

The New KDE "Fiber" Web Browser Deciding Between Qt WebEngine & Chromium

Filed under
KDE

A few weeks back we wrote about Fiber, yet another web-browser for Qt/KDE, while today there's a bit more information.

KDE developer Ken Vermette who has been working on the Fiber project provided a brief update today. He's been refactoring the existing code to fit Qt/KDE guidelines while now he's trying to decide on the browser layout/rendering engine.

Read more

Qt Purchasing Module Might Come To Qt 5.6 For Offering In-App Purchases

Filed under
KDE

Qt Purchasing is a module designed to help app developers handle in-app purchases. At present this module supports integration with the app stores on Apple iOS and Android, while there's already a patch pending to integrate support for the OS X App Store too. Other app store back-ends could be implemented for Windows, any Linux app store, etc.

Read more

KDE and Akademy

Filed under
KDE
  • Zanshin 0.2.2 transition release

    Three years, five months and eleven days... yes, it's the elapsed time since our last release announcement. But don't despair! We're still alive and kicking.

    We've been busy working on our next release which is much more ambitious than the previous one. As part of this future release, we had to adjust a bit how we store some information. That is why today we are announcing a transitional minor release.

    Behold Zanshin 0.2.2!

  • All the yummies at Akademy 2015
  • Fruits of Akademy

    For the second time I had the chance to attend Akademy, this time in cold and rainy La Coruña. It has been a week of interesting talks, good food (except for one Tortilla incident), and hacking.

    [...]

    KRunner History is Back

    Supposedly this was one of the reason I still saw quite a few people running Plasma 4 during the conference but now there’s no more reason not to do the switch! Wink

Tanglu 3 Distro Comes with Linux Kernel 4.0, GNOME 3.16, and KDE Plasma 5.3

Filed under
KDE
Linux
GNOME

Today, August 4, Matthias Klumpp was extremely happy to announce the release of the final version of his Tanglu 3 GNU/Linux distribution, dubbed Chromodoris Willani and based on the latest stable Debian GNU/Linux operating system.

Read more

Leftovers: KDE/Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • Randa - Bring Touch to KDE

    About a year ago, we talked with several people who were going to work together in Randa, Switzerland. These people were united by a love of KDE and had common motives—to make KDE technology better and have tons of fun while doing it!

    The 5th edition of the Randa Meetings high in the Swiss Alps in August 2014 was a huge success, with many new features and major new additions to KDE technology, through the dedicated efforts of about 50 KDE developers taking a week out of their busy lives to bring great software to users.

  • Unity 8 And KDE May Coexist On The Future Versions Of The Ubuntu Desktop

    The Ubuntu and KDE developers are working together at making Unity 8 and KDE coexist, permitting the users to have both the two desktop environments on the same system.

  • GCompris at Akademy 2015
  • Randa Meetings 2015 – The countdown begins
  • KDE.org Redesign

    KDE Frameworks, Plasma desktop, and our community have a rich history of nearly twenty years in creating great open-source software, making us a truly historic organisation of passionate developers; and along with that history some of our online infrastructure has begun to show its age. The KDE.org website and its various sections are the front door to the KDE ecosystem, it is how people new to KDE will judge us and it’s where our developers, translators, artists, and community members know their hard work will be presented to the world.

  • Akademy 2015 – Phones, CI, and Kubuntu

    Akademy always starts off with two days of ever so exciting talks on a number of engaging subjects. But this year particularly interesting things happened courtesy of Blue Systems.

Leftovers: KDE/Qt

Filed under
KDE

Unity 8 and KDE Will Be Able to Coexist on the Same Ubuntu OS

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

Unity 8 promises to be an evolution over the current Unity version, and it's a profoundly different piece of software. Yes, it brings a lot of new features and improvements, but it will also create a lot of issues. Like the ability to install a different desktop environment alongside, such as KDE.

Read more

KDE and Akademy

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma 5: Keeping an Eye on the Disk Quota

    At this year’s KDE conference Akademy, I was working on a small plasmoid to continuously track the disk quota.

    The disk quota is usually used in enterprise installations where network shares are mounted locally. Typically, sysadmins want to avoid that users copy lots of data into their folders, and therefor set quotas (the quota limit has nothing to do with the physical size of a partition). Typically, once a user gets over the hard limit of the quota, the account is blocked and the user cannot login anymore. This happens from time to time, since the users are not really aware of the current quota limit and the already used disk space.

  • KDEPIM 5.0

    KDEPIM 5.0 is the port of kdepim to kf5/qt5.

  • rsibreak port to KF5 started!

    I just started the port of rsibreak to KF5.

  • Akademy 2015
  • Akademy 2015 and Akademy-es 2015 recap

    Finally thanks to the both Akademy and Akademy-es sponsors. Specially Qindel, that sponsored us for the first time, hope we can continue the relationship in the future.

  • Plasma 5 (KDE) In Testing

    A few days ago, fellow Qt/KDE team member Lisandro gave an update on the situation with migration to Plasma 5 in Debian Testing (AKA Stretch). It’s changed again. All of Plasma 5 is now in Testing. The upgrade probably won’t be entirely smooth, which we’ll work on that after the gcc5 transition is done, but it will be much better than the half KDE4 SC half Kf5/Plasma 5 situation we’ve had for the last several days.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.