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KDE

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma Mobile running on Nexus 5X (bullhead)

    Currently Plasma Mobile is supported by very small number of devices, for example Nexus 5, and One plus one. These devices uses Android 5.0 or CM12 as their base. Current libhybris upstream doesn’t have support for the devices running Android 6.0 (Marshmallow), however there are two different forks of libhybris which are proposed to be merged into upstream libhybris and supports the Android 6.0,

  • Smaragd for Plasma 5

    Smaragd is a port of the Emerald window decoration engine to Plasma‘s window manager KWin. In other words, if you install Smaragd, you will be able to use Emerald themes for Compiz/Beryl in your Plasma desktop.

    Smaragd was already released 6 years ago for KWin 4. Today, I have ported most of it to the new KDecoration2 API that KWin 5 uses. What is still missing is the configuration dialog, but you should be able to move the old kwinsmaragdrc file to ~/.config/ to keep your old settings.

  • Release GCompris 0.70

    just in time for Christmas, we are pleased to announce the new GCompris version 0.70.

    It is an important release because we officially drop the Gtk+ version for Windows to use the Qt one.
    Everyone who bought the full version for the last two years will get a new activation code in a few days.

    Also, for people who like numbers, we are beyond 100000 downloads in the google play store.

  • Dedoimedo interviews: KDE team

    Behold, for we are doing it again. Several days ago, I've given you an interview with the MX Linux team developer Dolphin Oracle. It was a very interesting glimpse into how a small, passionate community runs their project.

    Now, we will expand and look at the far end of the Linux spectrum - the KDE community, one of the oldest, largest, most prolific, and most influential software and technology houses in the open-source world. And we will not have just one interviewee, but two! Sebastian Kugler and Bhushan Shah. Let us commence.

  • Seasons of KDE

    Last week I received my Seasons of KDE T-Shirt and Certificate, along with a print of the KDE Mascot Konqi. Thanks to everybody at KDE for this!

  • Qt Automotive Suite video

    KDAB’s experience with using Qt in the motor industry has shown us that a specifically tailored automotive Qt solution would be very valuable. So, with our partners The Qt Company and Pelagicore we created the Qt Automotive Suite, a comprehensive solution with a licensing model specifically designed for the automotive industry.

  • KDAB adds five new trainings in 2017

    We’re adding an exciting raft of new trainings to our schedule for 2017 and some new locations, including San Francisco, Seoul and Beijing.

    Throughout the year you will be able to sign up for top class, always-up-to-date, original-authored trainings, presented by fully qualified KDAB trainers, all engineers actively involved in delivering KDAB’s high quality projects. Here’s what others are saying about our trainings.

  • Qt Champions for 2016

    It is the time of the year when we take a look back and see who have been the Qt Champions this year.

    First I would like to point out that all the people nominated are all incredible!

KDE Contributor Showcases Android 6.0-Based Plasma Mobile Running on Nexus 5X

Filed under
Android
KDE

KDE contributor Bhushan Shah recently showcased a modified version of the Plasma Mobile operating system, based on Google's Android 6.0 OS, on the LG Nexus 5X smartphone.

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KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Icon Widget Properties

    A feature that went missing in the transition from Plasma 4 to Plasma 5 was the ability to configure the icon widget. The upcoming Plasma 5.9 release is where this dialog will finally make its entry into the 5.x series.

  • How input works – pointer input

    In the last blog post I discussed keyboard input. This blog post will be all about pointer devices – mostly known as “mouse”. Like my other posts in this series, this post only discusses the situation on KWin/Wayland.

  • QtCon Talks here

    Many KDABians attended QtCon and contributed to the unique new Qt event we co-created in Berlin, the summer of 2016, along with Qt Contributors, KDE Akademi, VideoLan and FSFE.

  • Embedded Devices with Qt and the INTEGRITY RTOS

    Qt 4.8 support has been available for a long time on the INTEGRITY RTOS. We are now pleased to announce that a proof-of-concept port of Qt 5.7 to INTEGRITY has been completed by Green Hills engineers. During the work, we tested the port on all major embedded HW platforms, including ones that have OpenGL ES support available. Work continues together with The Qt Company and the Qt ecosystem and thanks to this initial prototype, the upcoming Qt 5.9 is expected to contain INTEGRITY support.

  • What I've been upto

    Yup, this project has been in the pipeline for months. While it (mostly) works on a clean install of KDE, it has some bugs with copying with mtp:/ device slaves and isn't very well integrated with Dolphin yet. It is in my best interest to have this shipped with KDE Frameworks as soon as possible, so I'm looking into patching Dolphin with better, more specific action support for my project.

KDE Partition Manager 3.0.0 Supports LVM on LUKS and LUKS on LVM Configurations

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KDE

Long-time KDE developer Andrius Štikonas had the great pleasure of announcing this past weekend the release and general availability of a new, major milestone of the KDE Partition Manager open-source partition editor tool for KDE Plasma desktops.

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Also: KDE Announces SystemdGenie, a Graphical Tool for Managing Systemd and User Units

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Gets A Systemd Genie; KDE Partition Manager 3.0 Released

    There are two noteworthy pieces of KDE news as the weekend comes to an end.

    First up, KDE developer Ragnar Thomsen has shifted his focus from systemd-kcm as the KDE configuration module for managing systemd into its own application: SystemdGenie. SystemdGenie is systemd-kcm turned into its own full-fledged Qt application. With morphing it into its own application, SystemdGenie offers more functionality and more UI options than being a KDE KCM module.

  • Killing the redundancy with automation

    In the past three weeks, the openSUSE community KDE team has been pretty busy to package the latest release of Applications from KDE, 16.12. It was a pretty large task, due to the number of programs involved, and the fact that several monolithic projects were split (in particular KDE PIM). This post goes through what we did, and how we improved our packaging workflow.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Kdenlive 16.12 released
  • Plasma 5.9 Wallpaper “Canopee”

    It’s that time of the release cycle! Plasma 5.9 is getting a new wallpaper, “Canopee”, French for canopy. Like the last wallpaper, Bismuth, we are again shipping with a 4K version.

  • Looking Forward

    We have just released Krita 3.1, but we are already deep into coding again! We will continue releasing bug fix versions of Krita 3.1.x until it’s time to release 3.2 (or maybe 4.0…). And, as with 2.9, some bug fix releases might even contain new features, if they’re small and safe enough. But we’ll also start making development builds soon, and there’s also the daily build for Windows.

  • Made with Krita 2016 — the Krita Artbook
  • [Krita] Interview with Jabari Dumisani

    Actually I was looking for some GIMP update news online, ended up on a Blender 3D forum and heard about Krita from one of the posts, never hearing of it before. I nosed around, followed the trail to the .org website, and the rest was history. Krita and I have been buddies ever since.

  • Cutelyst 1.1.2 released

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt Web Framework just got a new release.

    Yesterday I was going to do the 1.1.0 release, after running tests, and being happy with current state I wrote this blog post, but before I publish I went to http://www.cutelyst.org CMS (CMlyst) to paste the same post, and I got hit by a bug I had on 1.0.0, which at time I thought it was a bug in CMlyst, so decided to investigate and found a few other bugs with our WSGI not properly changing the current directory and not replacing the + sign with an ‘ ‘ space when parsing formdata, which was the main bug. So did the fixes tagged as 1.1.1 and today found that automatically setting Content-Length wasn’t working when the View rendered nothing.

  • KDE Applications 16.12.0 just out!
  • Marble in your CMake or qmake based project, now more easy
  • How input works – Keyboard input
  • Now Dock v0.5

Bluestar Linux: A Beautiful Take on KDE and a User-Friendly Arch-Based Distribution

Filed under
KDE
Linux

Have you ever wanted a combination of Arch Linux and KDE but always seemed to get stumped at the Arch Linux portion of the combination? If that’s you, your days of being left out in the Arch Linux/KDE cold are over. Why? Bluestar Linux.

This new(ish) kid on the block allows you to enjoy Arch Linux without having to jump through all the usual hoops of setting the distribution up manually, plus it offers a rather unique take on KDE, one that had me instantly nodding my head in agreement with their layout. In fact, what Bluestar did with KDE makes so much sense, it has me wondering why this isn’t the default layout of the “K” Desktop Environment (more on this in a bit).

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KDE/Qt: KDE Applications 16.12.0 and Qt Creator 4.2

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Ships KDE Applications 16.12.0

    December 15, 2016. Today, KDE introduces KDE Applications 16.12, with an impressive array of upgrades when it comes to better ease of access, the introduction of highly useful functionalities and getting rid of some minor issues, bringing KDE Applications one step closer to offering you the perfect setup for your device.

  • KDE Applications 16.12 Released: KWave Added, Konqueror Ported To KF5

    The KDE community banded together today to issue their big KDE Applications 16.12 update.

    Among the changes to KDE Applications 16.12 is adding the KWave sound editor to the bundle, Marble adds a wallpaper and widget mode, KCharSelect now handles Unicode emoticons, Cantor supports a Julia back-end, Ark archiving improvements, and many other changes.

  • KDE Applications 16.12 Released with Kwave Sound Editor, Advanced Archiving

    Today, December 15, 2016, as expected, KDE announced the general availability of the KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environments on various Linux-based operating systems.

    KDE Applications 16.12 had a short development cycle, since November 10, 2016, when it entered Dependency Freeze stage. A Beta was announced one week later, on November 17, and the Release Candidate build landed two weeks later, on the first day of December. And now, you the final release is here with numerous goodies.

  • Qt Creator 4.2 Launches with New Qt SCXML Editor Module, Better CMake Support

    Today, December 14, 2016, the Qt Company was pleased to announce the final release of the open-source, free, and cross-platform Qt Creator 4.2 IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows platforms.

Qt 5.7.1 and Qt Creator 4.2

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • Qt 5.7.1 Released

    Qt 5.7.1 has been released today. It contains all the latest bug fixes and improvements, including everything from Qt 5.6.2 patch release as well as additional improvements and functionality not available in the Qt 5.6 branch.

    The brand new Qt Creator 4.2.0 is also included in the Qt 5.7.1 offline installer packages as well as the online installer.

  • Qt Creator 4.2 released

    Qt SCXML is a new module in Qt that allows you to create state machines from State Chart XML and embed them into Qt C++ and Qt Quick applications (Overview). It was released as Technical Preview in Qt 5.7 and will be released fully supported with Qt 5.8.

  • Qt 5.7.1 & Qt Creator 4.2 Released

    The Qt Company has announced the first point release to Qt 5.7 as well as putting out the Qt Creator 4.2 upgrade to their integrated development environment.

    Qt 5.7.1 includes all of the latest bug fixes and minor improvements, including some work not currently found on the Qt 5.6 branch. More details on Qt 5.7.1 changes via this blog post.

Krita 3.1 Released

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • Krita 3.1 Released!

    Today the Krita team releases Krita 3.1.0 ! Krita 3.1 is the first release that is fully supported on OSX (10.9 and later)! Krita 3.1 is the result of half a year of intense work and contains many new features, performance improvement and bug fixes. It’s now possible to use render animations (using ffmpeg) to gif or various video formats. You can use a curve editor to animate properties. Soft-proofing was added for seeing how your artwork will look in print. A new color picker that allows selecting wide-gamut colors. There is also a new brush engine that paints fast on large canvases, a stop-based gradient editor.

  • KDE's Krita 3.1 Released With Speedups & Improvements

    After the big Krita 3.0 release earlier this year, the crew responsible for this open-source digital painting software aligned with KDE has released Krita 3.1.

  • Krita 3.1 Digital Painting App Officially Released with Many Cool New Features

    A few moments ago, the development team behind the powerful, open-source, free, and cross-platform Krita digital painting software proudly announced the final release of Krita 3.1.

    After being in development for the past few months, Krita 3.1 is now that most advanced version of the application, bringing cool new features like full support for Apple's Mac OS X operating system, as well as the ability to render an animation to MKV, GIF, MP4, or OGG files using the FFmpeg multimedia framework.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Recursive DNS Server Fingerprint Problem

    Our goal is to identify hijacked resolvers by analyzing their fingerprints, in order to increase safety of Internet users. To do that, we utilize data collected via RIPE Atlas (atlas.ripe.net).

  • Online developer tutorials are spreading XSS and SQL injection flaws

    The researchers, from across three universities in Germany and Trend Micro, checked the PHP code bases of more than 64,000 projects on Github and uncovered more than 100 vulnerabilities that they believe might have been introduced as a result of developers picking up the code that they used from online tutorials.

  • BrickerBot, the permanent denial-of-service botnet, is back with a vengeance

    BrickerBot, the botnet that permanently incapacitates poorly secured Internet of Things devices before they can be conscripted into Internet-crippling denial-of-service armies, is back with a new squadron of foot soldiers armed with a meaner arsenal of weapons.

  • Reproducible Builds: week 104 in Stretch cycle
  • Webroot antivirus goes bananas, starts trashing Windows system files
    Webroot's security tools went berserk today, mislabeling key Microsoft Windows system files as malicious and temporarily removing them – knackering PCs in the process. Not only were people's individual copies of the antivirus suite going haywire, but also business editions and installations run by managed service providers (MSPs), meaning companies and organizations relying on the software were hit by the cockup. Between 1200 and 1500 MST (1800 and 2100 UTC) today, Webroot's gear labeled Windows operating system data as W32.Trojan.Gen – generic-Trojan-infected files, in other words – and moved them into quarantine, rendering affected computers unstable. Files digitally signed by Microsoft were whisked away – but, luckily, not all of them, leaving enough of the OS behind to reboot and restore the quarantined resources.
  • How The Update Framework Improves Security of Software Updates
    Updating software is one of the most important ways to keep users and organizations secure. But how can software be updated securely? That's the challenge that The Update Framework (TUF) aims to solve. Justin Cappos, assistant professor at New York University, detailed how TUF works and what's coming to further improve the secure updating approach in a session at last week's DockerCon 17 conference in Austin, Texas. Simply using HTTPS and Transport Layer Security (TLS) to secure a download isn't enough as there have been many publicly reported instances of software repositories that have been tampered with, Cappos said.
  • Security Updates for Ubuntu Phone to End in June
    Security updates for Ubuntu phone and tablet will end this June, Canonical has confirmed. Current OTA updates are currently limited to critical fixes and security updates — a decision we were first to tell you back in January. But after June 2017 Canonical “will no longer deliver any further updates”.
  • Canonical to stop supporting Ubuntu Phone in June
    Canonical had already announced development of its Ubuntu Phone software was ending. Now we know when the final nail goes in the coffin: June.
  • Malware Hunts And Kills Poorly Secured Internet Of Things Devices Before They Can Be Integrated Into Botnets
    Researchers say they've discovered a new wave of malware with one purpose: to disable poorly secured routers and internet of things devices before they can be compromised and integrated into botnets. We've often noted how internet-of-broken-things devices ("smart" doorbells, fridges, video cameras, etc.) have such flimsy security that they're often hacked and integrated into botnets in just a matter of seconds after being connected to the internet. These devices are then quickly integrated into botnets that have been responsible for some of the worst DDoS attacks we've ever seen (including last October's attack on DYN).

GNOME/GTK News

  • The Way GNOME Handles Wallpapers Really Annoys Me
    I love GNOME Shell — and no, not just because I’ve little choice now that is Ubuntu’s default desktop! But the more I use GNOME the more I learn that the desktop environment, like every other, has its own share of quirks, bugs and inconsistencies. Like the following appreciably niche niggle in the the way GNOME handles desktop wallpapers.
  • Drag-and-drop in lists
    I’ve recently had an occasion to implement reordering of a GtkListBox via drag-and-drop (DND). It was not that complicated. Since I haven’t seen drag-and-drop used much with list boxes, here is a quick summary of what is needed to get the basics working.

Containers News

  • How Kubernetes is making contributing easy
    As the program manager of the Kubernetes community at Google, Sarah Novotny has years of experience in open source communities including MySQL and NGINX. Sarah sat down with me at CloudNativeCon in Berlin at the end of March to discuss both the Kubernetes community and open source communities more broadly. Among the topics we covered in the podcast were the challenges inherent in shifting from a company-led project to a community-led one, principles that can lead to more successful communities, and how to structure decision-making.
  • How Microsoft helped Docker with LinuxKit and Moby Project [Ed: Microsoft 'helped'... embrace, extend, coerce; haven't Docker employees learned from history?]
    Today, supporting Linux is as critical to Microsoft as it is to Red Hat and SUSE.
  • How to make branding decisions in an open community
    On April 18, Docker founder Solomon Hykes made a big announcement via a pull request in the main Docker repo: "Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward." The docker/docker repo now redirects to moby/moby, and Solomon's pull request updates the README and logo for the project to match. Reaction from the Docker community has been overwhelmingly negative. As of this writing, the Moby pull request has garnered 7 upvotes and 110 downvotes on GitHub. The Docker community is understandably frustrated by this opaque announcement of a fait accompli, an important decision that a hidden inner circle made behind closed doors. It's a textbook case of "Why wasn't I consulted?"

Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner. That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week. While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer. Read more