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KDE

KDE: Dolphin, Qt 5.11 Beta, Connecting new Screens

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KDE
  • Tips and Tricks for KDE 5 Dolphin File Manager

    Years ago when the KDE team decided to move from Konquerer to Dolphin in KDE4, it was controversial, with some people in support of the move, and others against it.

    Now, it’s widely recognized that Dolphin is probably the most powerful file manager for GNU/Linux, with a number of features and enhancements to make workflow as simple, quick, and informative as possible.

    With that said, I thought I would perhaps share just a few things that people may overlook in their Dolphin setup, that you might enjoy.

  • Qt 5.11 Beta Rolls Out, Multiple Betas Expected

    It's been just one week since Qt 5.11 Alpha shipped while today The Qt Company released Qt 5.11 Beta 1.

  • Connecting new screens

    This week, Dan Vratil and me have merged a new feature in KScreen, Plasma’s screen configuration tool. Up until now, when plugging in a new display (a monitor, beamer or TV, for example), Plasma would automatically extend the desktop area to include this screen. In many cases, this is expected behavior, but it’s not necessarily clear to the user what just happened. Perhaps the user would rather want the new screen on the other side of the current, clone the existing screen, switch over to it or perhaps not use it at all at this point.

  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Getting Friendlier Monitor Hot-Plug Handling

    KDE's KScreen screen configuration tool is getting some nice improvements as part of the Plasma 5.13 development cycle.

    KDE developers Sebastian Kügler and Dan Vratil have been working to improve the behavior of the KDE Plasma desktop during monitor hot-plugging events. Current behavior is that the KDE desktop would be extended to include the new screen as soon as it's attached. With the new KScreen to be part of Plasma 5.13, there is a screen layout selection dialog that will appear on the primary display output when a new monitor/display is attached.

KDE: Asciiquarium, FreeBSD, KDAB, KStars

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KDE
  • Animated Plasma Wallpaper: Asciiquarium

    Years ago, for KDE 3, I had ported a console “asciiquarium” to operate as a KDE screensaver, called “KDE asciiquarium“. By KDE 4.2, it was included as part of the kdeartwork module by default.

    Since the KDE 3 times when I started this screensaver, our desktop concept has changed around a bit. We’ve developed the Plasma desktop, and have effectively deprecated the idea of screensavers (which are increasingly less popular), though lock screens are still important.

  • KDE Plasma 5 Should Soon Finally Be Ready For FreeBSD Ports

    Adriaan de Groot continues working on improving the KDE stack for FreeBSD. The moment is finally near where KDE Plasma 5 along with the modern KDE Applications stack should soon be available via the FreeBSD Ports collection.

    In preparation for finally having the modern KDE desktop stack available via FreeBSD Ports, the older KDE4 ports have been moved aside (but are still accessible via x11/kde4). KDE4 will continue to work for those who have already installed it on FreeBSD, but they are reorganizing these packages in preparation for pushing out the modern KDE Plasma 5 + Apps stack.

  • Clazy

    Clazy is a Clang plugin which extends the compiler with over 50 warnings related to Qt best practices ranging from unneeded memory allocations to API misuse. It’s an opensource project spawned by KDAB’s R&D efforts for better C++ tooling.

  • Hotspot

    Hotspot is a KDAB R&D project to create a standalone GUI for performance data. It is a replacement for perf report. Hotspot’s GUI takes a perf.data file, parses and evaluates its contents and then displays the result in a graphical way.

    Hotspot’s initial goal was to provide a UI like KCachegrind around Linux perf. In future versions we will be supporting various other performance data formats under this umbrella. You can find the source code on our GitHub page.

  • KStars 2.9.3 is out with numerous fixes

    After some heavy lifting in KStars January v2.9.2 release, we dedicated February to fix all those KStars issues that have been accumulating for a while. Today, KStars v2.9.3 is released with many several important fixes, mostly in Ekos scheduler and capture modules.

First Version of Falkon Web Browser Released

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KDE

The first release of Falkon, the KDE web browser formerly known as QupZilla, is available to download.

Falkon 3.0.0 is the first formal release of the rebadged Qt-based web navigator, and follows a name change in summer of last year.

As this is more of a rebranding than a brand new app you won’t notice too many visual differences between the latest stable release of QupZilla 2.2.5, and the first hatching of Falkon 3.0.

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KDE: FreeBSD, Benchmarks and More

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KDE
  • Outta the way, KDE4

    KDE4 has been rudely moved aside on FreeBSD. It still installs (use x11/kde4) and should update without a problem, but this is another step towards adding modern KDE (Plasma 5 and Applications) to the official FreeBSD Ports tree.

    This has taken a long time mostly for administrative reasons, getting all the bits lined up so that people sticking with KDE4 (which, right now, would be everyone using KDE from official ports and packages on FreeBSD) don’t end up with a broken desktop. We don’t want that. But now that everything Qt4 and kdelibs4-based has been moved aside by suffixing it with -kde4, we have the unsuffixed names free to indicate the latest-and-greatest from upstream.

  • On Benchmarks

    A well knwon Linux website published a “benchmark” about Plasma Wayland vs Plasma Xorg vs Gnome Shell (Wayland and Xorg). Before anybody tries to draw any conclusion: this is not a proper benchmark. It shows no statistical relevance as it was only tested on one hardware and only on one distribution. It shows numbers, that’s it. The numbers might be nice or not, I don’t know. I am not able to draw any conclusions from these numbers.

  • Event Notes

    But if you’re thirsting for more KDE events, there’s the list of KDE Sprints which is where you will find the small, focused, fairly short events for hacking on a well-defined project. Some are open for visitors, and if there’s something you want to hack on with a group of KDE contributors, get organising! (Like, seriously, getting a hacking weekend together is just a few phone calls to reserve a rental house somewhere nice and to arrange for transportation — if you can get the people together, which is usually the biggest problem).

  • Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.2.0 Released

IU not UI – Want a great desktop? Use the brain.

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KDE

The desktop works. It’s a given. Plasma works, too. No argument there. But that does mean we’ve peaked, or even come remotely close to nailing the desktop formula. It is true that a lot of things we do today have become a habit, which is why people rarely look at the norms and wonder if they might be silly or inefficient. They just are. But Plasma is a growing, evolving, and it has the power – and chance – to break through the stagnation. It won’t be trivial or fast. But it’s possible.

The main reason why Plasma can do this – it has the most advanced desktop ecosystem in the Linux world, and it’s probing into the waters of mobile usage. It could become the superior, superlative face of the desktop, so that one day, when the technology and human needs finally meet, i.e. the Linux desktop will have the applications that the majority of people need, it will not fail due to a classic mistake of neglecting the convoluted randomness of computer usage. Linux never had to face this problem due to its small share. But that day may yet come. You don’t want to be the guy telling your grandma to chroot her mail, now do you?

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KDE and GNOME: KDE Plasma 5.13 and Arrongin GTK

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KDE
GNOME
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Should Be Starting Up Even Faster

    One of the nice elements of KDE Plasma 5.12 is that it starts up faster, particularly when running on Wayland, but with Plasma 5.13 it's looking like it will be an even faster experience getting to the Plasma desktop.

    KDE Plasma 5.13 isn't scheduled to be released until the middle of June, but this next Plasma installment is already in heavy feature development following this month's successful Plasma 5.12 debut.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 7

    Another busy week in Usability & Productivity. As has been observed, we’re fixing issues at Warp 9 speed! KDE contributors racked up some pretty significant wins this week, and we’ve already got some great stuff in the pipeline that I hope to be able to announce next week! But for now, take a look at this week’s haul!

  • Arrongin GTK Theme Stands Out (But for the Right Reasons)

    Sure, the new Ubuntu theme is pretty great, but it’s still largely a mix of Ambiance, Adwaita and the proposed Unity 8 style. I.e. all known quantities.

    We’ve previously listed what we think are the best GTK themes for Ubuntu (and Linux in general). If you’ve read that list you may have noticed that a number of themes featured look similar, share design trends, or use a similar theme as a foundation.

    With former theme makers like ~half-left no longer making truly original GTK themes, Linux design has fallen into a bit of a creative lull. Every other theme that appears is (seemingly) based on either Adwaita, Arc or Adapta, uses material design cues (like Pop GTK), echoes macOS (Greybird, elementary) or is flatter than the response to most of my jokes (Arc, Plano, Ant, Vimix, et al).

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

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KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Discover, part 7

    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.

  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support

    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.

  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline

    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make.

    Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.

  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2

    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.

Mycroft AI on Plasma

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KDE

Mycroft is running through the last 24 hours of the crowdfunding campaign for its Mark II assistant. The machine looks awesome and offers similar functionality to other proprietary alternatives, but with none of the spying and leaking of personal data.

The Mark 2 will be delivered to backers at the end of this year, but you can enjoy the pleasures of giving orders to an AI right now by installing the Mycroft widget on Plasma courtesy of KDE hacker Aditya Mehra.

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Plasma Mobile Could Give Life to a Mobile Linux Experience

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KDE
Linux

In the past few years, it’s become clear that, outside of powering Android, Linux on mobile devices has been a resounding failure. Canonical came close, even releasing devices running Ubuntu Touch. Unfortunately, the idea of Scopes was doomed before it touched down on its first piece of hardware and subsequently died a silent death.

The next best hope for mobile Linux comes in the form of the Samsung DeX program. With DeX, users will be able to install an app (Linux On Galaxy—not available yet) on their Samsung devices, which would in turn allow them to run a full-blown Linux distribution. The caveat here is that you’ll be running both Android and Linux at the same time—which is not exactly an efficient use of resources. On top of that, most Linux distributions aren’t designed to run on such small form factors. The good news for DeX is that, when you run Linux on Galaxy and dock your Samsung device to DeX, that Linux OS will be running on your connected monitor—so form factor issues need not apply.

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Google Summer of Code 2018 for Qt and Qt Roadmap for 2018

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Development
KDE
Google
  • The Qt Project and Google Summer of Code 2018

    This year, for the first time, the Qt Project will be participating in the Google Summer of Code initiative.

  • Qt Roadmap for 2018

    Qt 5.9 LTS is a solid baseline, which continues to improve still during 2018. Qt 5.10 was released in December, but there is more cooking. We are currently finalizing the Qt 5.11 release for May and looking towards Qt 5.12 LTS in November. In addition to the Qt framework we are actively developing our tooling offering. Tune in for an overview what we have in the works for 2018.

  • Qt Has A Super Busy Year Ahead With A Lot Of Features Planned For 2018

    Tuukka Turunen of The Qt Company has shared some of the company's plans for the Qt toolkit in 2018. There is a lot ahead for this open-source, cross-platform toolkit in 2018 with another long-term support release later this year, new Qt Python bindings, a safety-critical renderer and more.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.