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KDE

Kraft Moving to KDE Frameworks: Beta Release!

Filed under
KDE

Kraft is KDE/Qt based desktop software to manage documents like quotes and invoices in the small business. It focuses on ease of use through an intuitive GUI, a well chosen feature set and ensures privacy by keeping data local.

Kraft is around for more than twelve years, but it has been a little quiet recently. However, Kraft is alive and kicking!

I am very happy to announce the first public beta version of Kraft V. 0.80, the first Kraft version that is based on KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5.x.

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Elisa 0.0.81 Released

Filed under
KDE

The Elisa team is happy to announce the second alpha release of the Elisa music player.

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Also: How do I test Plasma Mobile? (part 2)

GNOME and KDE in PureOS: diversity across devices

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME

PureOS, a Free Software Foundation endorsed GNU distribution, is what Purism pre-installs on all Librem laptops (in addition to it being freely available for the public to run on their own compatible hardware or virtual machines). It comes with a GNOME desktop environment by default, and of course, since we love free ethical software, users can use KDE that is also available within PureOS. This is the future we will continue to advance across all our devices: a PureOS GNOME-first strategy, with other Desktop Environments (DEs), such as KDE, available and supported by Purism.

At Purism we want a unified default desktop environment, and considering that we have chosen GNOME to be the default on laptops, we hope to extend GNOME to also be the default on phones. The ability for users to switch is also very powerful, and having a strong, usable, and supported alternative—that is, KDE/Plasma—for the Librem 5 offers the best of the “unified default” world and the “usable user choice” worlds.

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Calligra 3.1.0 Released, More on Yesterday's Release of LibreOffice 6

Filed under
KDE
LibO
  • Calligra 3.1.0 released

    We are pleased to announce the release of Calligra 3.1.0 with the following apps included:
    Words, Sheets, Karbon, Gemini, and Plan.

    Note that Gemini, the KDE Office suite for 2-in-1 devices, is back after missing from the initial Calligra 3.0 release.

    Also note that Kexi, the visual database applications creator is close to release 3.1.0.
    See http://www.kexi-project.org.

    The following is a list of new features and bug fixes since the last release (3.0.1).

  • KDE's Calligra 3.1 Officially Released, Gemini Ported To KDE Frameworks 5

    The KDE Calligra graphics/office suite forked from KOffice is up to version 3.1.

    Landing the same week as the big LibreOffice 6.0 open-source office suite unveil is now the Calligra 3.1 suite's release.

    We've known the update was coming and they managed to deliver this v3.1 release one year after Calligra 3.0.

  • LibreOffice, the best office suite, gets even better with LibreOffice 6.0

    OK, if you are tied at the hip to Microsoft Office I can see why you'll continue to pay year after year for your Office subscription. But, seriously, if you're not, why aren't you using the newest version of LibreOffice 6.0?

    The bottom line is the open-source LibreOffice just works. I've used every office suite since WordStar and DataStar were things. LibreOffice is every bit as good as Microsoft Office and it's free to boot.

    You can run LibreOffice on Linux, macOS, and Windows. You can also use on your web browser, if you deploy LibreOffice Online as software-as-a-service server on a cloud, bare-iron, or in a Docker container.

  • How to install LibreOffice 6 on Linux

Plasma Active: So far, so adequate

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Ever since Plasma Active was released in 2012, I’ve been waiting for KDE to release another desktop environment for mobile devices. Last week, that wait was finally over with the first alpha release of Plasma Mobile, Active’s successor. However, delay may have raised my expectations too high. While Mobile was full of innovations, so far, Active is simply another desktop for phones or tablets, appearing little different from what I currently have on my Android devices. Its main interest is the applications it includes, which seems to indicate Plasma Active’s design priorities.

What made Plasma Active such a standout was its innovations. It was KDE with a different desktop environment — a proof of concept of KDE 4’s arrangement of the desktop as a sub-system that could be swapped out for another with relative ease. Even more importantly, it innovated. Like Ubuntu Touch — which I suspect it inspired — Plasma Active worked by the user swiping from the sides of the screen. It also included an OsS X-like spinner rack for changing Activities, a widget so efficient that I wished that standard Plasma would include it, too. As I wrote at the time, it was the first desktop for mobile devices that did not feel like a clumsy makeshift, and could even work well on a laptop or workstation. Unfortunately, however, Plasma Active never made it on to any shipped devices.

By contrast, Plasma Mobile has already received publicity, thanks to the announcement that Purism’s free and secure phone the Librem 5 would include it as one of the available desktop environments. That announcement may have hastened the release of the alpha, perhaps pushing it out prematurely, since there is very little that you can actually do with Plasma Mobile when you install it on a virtual machine. Click any of the icons — at least in my experience — and most of the time you get a flickering or frozen screen, forcing you to shut it down and reboot. So far, only the Setting icon works reliably.

Still, like Plasma Active, Plasma Mobile does show off the efficiency of the KDE environment, providing what by my count is the third alternative to standard Plasma (the other, for those keeping count, was Plasma Netbook, yet another desktop since faded into obscurity). Beneath it is the familiar KDE; the command line, for example, is Konsole.

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Also: Another Morevna fundraiser!

KDE: Akademy 2018, KEXI, Falkon, Plasma 5.12

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KDE
  • Events: Akademy 2018

    Not nearly as close as FOSDEM, but still coming up on the KDE Community calendar: Akademy 2018. It’s in Vienna. I vaguely remember visiting Vienna once, long ago — possibly an FSFE function. So it’s high time to head out that way again to visit the local KDE team and to see what 2017-2018 has brought (and will bring) the KDE community.

  • KEXI 3.1.0 Beta & Frameworks

    Today is the release day for KEXI 3.1.0 Beta & its frameworks: https://community.kde.org/Kexi/Releases#3.1.0_Beta_1

    Since version 3 it becomes KEXI not Kexi to suggest becoming a standalone app. It's standalone status includes being first-class app also outside of KDE Plasma. To make this real things such as useful yet simple file widget are developed or single click mode is really single click mode "even" on XFCE. Actually implementing optimal experience for Windows is quite similar to supporting XFCE.

    KEXI Frameworks are now prepared for backward compatibility rules within the series >=3.1. So I would encourage to try KProperty if you need powerful property editing features in your app in place of tedious Qt list or tree views. There's KPropertyExample in the same repository. Then there's KDb if you actually expect more (something low or high-level) than QtSql, that is also need to create database or SQLite-based documents, what seems to be very popular container in our times. Then try KReport if you want escape from generating (ODF/HTML/whatever) documents "by hand", or QPainting them by hand, just to be able to print your application's data in a structured way with nice title, header, footer. Try KReportExample to see KReport in action with "a few lines of code" app.

  • New artwork for Falkon, do you have any ideas?

    The lead developer has called for submissions on a new logo for Falkon.  One of the current submissions, which I must say I love, is shown below by Andres Betts who is on the KDE VDG team.

  • Polishing Plasma 5.12

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Can Now Try Out the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Desktop

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

Eight new snapshots have been released for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed since our last report, bringing users the beta version for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS desktop environment, which is coming in early February, along with the first point release of the KDE Applications 17.12 software suite and KDE Frameworks 5.42.0.

"The largest snapshot of the week was no doubt snapshot 20180122. The snapshot provided KDE Applications 17.12.1, Frameworks 5.42.0 and the beta version for KDE’s next Long-Term-Support (LTS) release of Plasma 5.12. Tumbleweed users can try out the new items in the 5.12 LTS like the new KDE Store, which brings a wide selection of addons," Douglas DeMaio wrote in a weekly report.

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You Can Now Use VirtualBox to Test KDE Plasma Mobile

Filed under
KDE

If you’re keen to try KDE Plasma mobile first hand I’ve some good news for you: it just got super easy to download and test it.

Yup, KDE has announced that a new ISO image is now available to download. Using this image you can boot an alpha-quality version of Plasma Mobile in a virtual machine app like VirtualBox or KVM.

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KDE: digiKam, Plasma Mobile, KDE Discover, Plasma Vault

Filed under
KDE
  • digiKam Recipes 18-01-25 Released

    After a somewhat prolonged hiatus (my move from Denmark to Germany and full-time job at SUSE Linux GmbH had something to do with this), a new revision of the digiKam Recipes book is ready for your reading pleasure.

    A new book cover is probably the most visible change, but it’s certainly not the only one. All the screenshots have been updated to reflect changes in the latest version of digiKam. Obsolete content has been pruned, and some of the existing material has been revised and updated.

  • Events: FOSDEM 2018

    There’s a KDE stand where you can see some of the latest KDE bits and pieces, including Plasma 5 running on low-power hardware. 2GB ought to be enough for everyone, right? We might have a phone available running the existing Plasma Mobile code, since hardware continues to be tricky to come by (Nexus5X is fine).

  • This week in Discover, part 3

    In addition, we fixed bugs, including a few corner-case issues for workflows where Flatpak apps are available alongside apps from your distro. Flatpak support is constantly improving!

  • Plasma Vault and CryFS upgrades

    CryFS is considered beta software by its developers.

    While that is completely fine, it is a bit of a problem for the LTS release of Plasma Vault.

    The most recent problem that I was made aware of is that CryFS breaks its filesystem layout in new releases. While this is not a problem when using cryfs from the command line, it is a problem for UIs that use it like Plasma Vault, SiriKali and others.

KStars 2.9.2 Released!

Filed under
KDE

Glad to announce the release of KStars 2.9.2 for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.

In addition to the usual bug fixes and enhancement, we finally have proper cross-platform theming support! Most of the code was based on Digikam's theming code so Kudos to Digikam team for their great work!

Now Windows and MacOS users can enjoy the KStars dark theme in all of its glory!

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15 books for kids who (you want to) love Linux and open source

In my job I've heard professionals in tech, from C-level executives to everyone in between, say they want their own kids to learn more about Linux and open source. Some of them seem to have an easy time with their kids following closely in their footsteps. And some have a tough time getting their kids to see what makes Linux and open source so cool. Maybe their time will come, maybe it won't. There's a lot of interesting, valuable stuff out there in this big world. Read more

Security: VPNFilter, Encryption in GNU/Linux, Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints

  • [Crackers] infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

    VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory. It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed.

  • Do Not Use sha256crypt / sha512crypt - They're Dangerous

    I'd like to demonstrate why I think using sha256crypt or sha512crypt on current GNU/Linux operating systems is dangerous, and why I think the developers of GLIBC should move to scrypt or Argon2, or at least bcrypt or PBKDF2.

  • Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints
    I investigated an rr bug report and discovered an annoying Intel CPU bug that affects rr replay using data watchpoints. It doesn't seem to be hit very often in practice, which is good because I don't know any way to work around it. It turns out that the bug is probably covered by an existing Intel erratum for Skylake and Kaby Lake (and probably later generations, but I'm not sure), which I even blogged about previously! However, the erratum does not mention watchpoints and the bug I've found definitely depends on data watchpoints being set. I was able to write a stand-alone testcase to characterize the bug. The issue seems to be that if a rep stos (and probably rep movs) instruction writes between 1 and 64 bytes (inclusive), and you have a read or write watchpoint in the range [64, 128) bytes from the start of the writes (i.e., not triggered by the instruction), then one spurious retired conditional branch is (usually) counted. The alignment of the writes does not matter, and it's not related to speculative execution.

In Memoriam: Robin "Roblimo" Miller, a Videographer and Free Software Champion

Videographer Robin Roblimo Miller

Robin "Roblimo" Miller was a clever, friendly, and very amicable individual who everyone I know has plenty of positive things to say about. I had the pleasure of speaking to him for several hours about anything from personal life and professional views. Miller was a very knowledgeable person whose trade as a journalist and video producer I often envied. I have seen him facing his critics in his capacity as a journalist over a decade ago when he arranged a debate about OOXML (on live radio). Miller, to me, will always be remembered as a strong-minded and investigative journalist who "did the right thing" as the cliché goes, irrespective of financial gain -- something which can sometimes be detrimental to one's longterm health. Miller sacrificed many of his later years to a cause worth fighting for. This is what we ought to remember him for. Miller was - and always will be - a FOSS hero.

May everything you fought for be fulfilled, Mr. Miller. I already miss you.

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