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KDE

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE

KDE's Plasma 5.7, GNOME 3.20

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KDE
GNOME
  • KDE's Plasma 5.7 To Let You Login To Online Accounts, Initially OwnCloud

    A nice feature coming to KDE Plasma 5.7 is support for logging into an online account from the login manager to have your Plasma configuration synced from the remote server. Initially this work is focused around supporting ownCloud. If supplying your username, password, and ownCloud provider to the Plasma 5.7 log-in screen, you'll have all of your data synced locally. This will include Plasma's look and feel, ownCloud hosted files, email data, contacts, and calendar.

  • GNOME 3.20 Provides Shortcuts to the Linux Desktop

    GNOME 3.20 is the first major update to the GNOME desktop environment in 2016, officially becoming generally available on March 23—and since that date it has been slowly trickling into the repositories of Linux distributions. GNOME 3.20 is code-named Delhi in honor of the GNOME.Asia event that will be held in Delhi, India, April 21-24. The new GNOME release is the first since GNOME 3.18 in September 2015, and it provides incremental improvements. An overarching update across multiple applications in GNOME 3.20 are new shortcut screens that provide users with a simple list of keyboard shortcuts to perform common actions in a given application. As was the case with GNOME 3.18, the File utility in GNOME 3.20 benefits from usability improvements. This time, the improvements are around searching and finding files on the system. The Web application is also improved, with improved session restore capabilities. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at the key features of the GNOME 3.20 desktop update.

Plasma, online accounts and sync: what is true

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KDE

My previous post, as many have quickly realized, was an April Fool’s joke, sorry. But it will not be entirely false: the only sure thing is that something as complex won’t be released for the 5.7. And what makes it so complex is the involvement of the login manager (SDDM). In fact, as many pointed out around the web, there would be security risks. After all it wanted to be a joke.
By the way the integration with Internet services and sync of user’s data was and is a topic discussed in Plasma. Today, because of this joke, we at VDG discussed about this feature. Here there are some conclusions/ideas:

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Plasma 5.7 will let you login through online account

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KDE

KDE is going to provide an ownCloud installation to let Plasma and KDE PIM (Kontact) users sync their data: you can already use ownCloud with cardDAV, calDAV and webDAV protocols to keep contacts, calendars and files synced across your devices, including the ones powered by Plasma and Kontact.

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Status QtWebEngine in KDEPIM

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KDE

As QtWebKit will be remove from official Qt package I decided some months ago to evaluate QtWebEngine.

For sure QtWebEngine < 5.6 was too limited. But I started to use it. I evaluated QtWebEngine 5.5 but some features were missing (as possibility to block request or use custom scheme url).

I started to focus on Akregator as it still used khtml, I migrated it to QtWebKit and after that to QtWebEngine. (For 16.04 there is a experimental option to activate compilation).

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KDE and GNOME

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KDE
GNOME
  • Qt 5.7 Beta Is Running Behind Schedule

    While Qt 5.6 was just released after being delayed by months, Qt 5.7 was supposed to be a quick follow-on release but it too is already seeing delays.

    Qt 5.7 went into alpha while Qt 5.6 was still being prepared for release, but now the Qt 5.7 beta is going to be delayed by an unknown amount of time.

  • KDE Announces Kirigami UI
  • KDE Announces Kirigami UI, a Framework to Build Cross-Platform Qt-Based Apps

    Today, March 30, 2016, KDE, through Thomas Pfeiffer, has proudly announced a new framework for developers who want to build cross-platform Qt-based applications.

  • Positive progress on WebKitGTK+ security updates

    I previously reported that, although WebKitGTK+ releases regular upstream security updates, most Linux distributions are not taking the updates. At the time, only Arch Linux and Fedora were reliably releasing our security updates. So I’m quite pleased that openSUSE recently released a WebKitGTK+ security update, and then Mageia did too. Gentoo currently has an update in the works. It remains to be seen if these distros regularly follow up on updates (expect a follow-up post on this in a few months), but, optimistically, you now have several independent distros to choose from to get an updated version WebKitGTK+, plus any distros that regularly receive updates directly from these distros.

  • GUADEC 2016 call for talks

    GUADEC 2016 will be held for the first time in Karlsruhe, Germany. The conference will be held on August 12th-14th, with a day of workshops beforehand, and 3 days of BoFs and hackfests after.

KDE Proudly Presents Kirigami UI!

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KDE

KDE has a long tradition of providing user interface components beyond the basics that are offered in Qt itself. With KDE Frameworks 5, these have become more easily available for Qt developers who are not part of KDE. Now, with KDE's focus expanding beyond desktop and laptop computers into the mobile and embedded sector, our QWidgets-based components alone are not sufficient anymore. In order to allow developers to easily create Qt-based applications that run on any major mobile or desktop operating system (including our very own existing Plasma Desktop and upcoming Plasma Mobile, of course), we have created a framework that extends the touch-friendly Qt Quick Controls: Welcome Kirigami UI!

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Digikam updated in area51

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KDE

The latest version of digiKam has been added to the unofficial ports tree in area51. The unofficial ports tree is where the KDE-FreeBSD team works on ports in preparation for their inclusion into the official ports tree. The trunk of that repository is basically “what’s next” for the official ports tree from our point of view. There are other branches: mostly plasma5, for the upcoming (from a FreeBSD perspective, at least) KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 5; qt5.6 for testing the recently-released Qt 5.6. Official ports will remain Qt 5.5 for the time being.

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Manjaro 15.12 KDE - close, but not perfect

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KDE
Linux
Reviews

Manjaro 15.12 KDE 64-bit in Live session felt very snappy and fast. I had no issues with the system performance.

However, there were still some issues that I drew attention to in the paragraphs above.

I would like to say that if I had a choice between the KDE and Xfce editions of Manjaro operating system, the latter would still be my preference.

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KDE Plasma 5.6 Gets Its First Point Release, Brings Small Bug Fixes

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KDE
Security

Today, March 29, 2016, KDE had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability of the first point release for the stable KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment.

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More in Tux Machines

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.

The Peppermint Twist Is Still Cool

Peppermint is a solid Linux operating system with a record for good performance and reliability. It is an ideal choice for handling everyday computing chores. LXDE provides a fast and friendly desktop environment. The entire desktop package and tweaked Peppermint 7 settings give you lots of options for creating a comfortable platform. My only dissatisfaction is the lack of much in the way of desktop animation effects. All it provides are semi-transparent application interfaces in the background. The Peppermint community is headed by the Peppermint OS LLC, a software company based in Asheville, North Carolina. Founded in 2010, the open source company issues one major release per year. A partial upgrade rolls out periodically. Read more