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KDE

KDE: Kirigami Framework and KDE Applications 17.08

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KDE
  • KDE Frameworks Now Shipping with Kirigami Framework for Building Convergent UIs

    After launching the first point release of the KDE Applications 17.08 software suite, the KDE project announced this week the release of KDE Frameworks 5.38.0, the monthly update to the open-source collection of add-on libraries for the latest Qt 5 technologies.

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Gets First Point Release, More Than 20 Bugs Got Squashed

    Right on the schedule, the latest stable KDE Applications 17.08 software suite got its first point release, versioned 17.08.1, this week, fixing more than 20 recorded bugs and improving support for several KDE apps.

    As expected, KDE Applications 17.08.1 is a bug fix release, addressing various of the bugs, crashes, and other issues reported by users since the launch of the KDE Applications 17.08 stable series in mid-August 2017. Numerous KDE apps received improvements, including bug not limited to Akonadi, Minuet, Akregator, Kdenlive, Ark, Cantor, Cervisia, Gwenview, JuK, Umbrello, Okular, Konsole, and Kontact.

Best KDE Linux Distributions For Your Desktop, Quick Look at Next Kubuntu, and Randa

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KDE
  • Best KDE Linux Distributions For Your Desktop

    best kde linux distributions for your desktop
    KDE remains one of the most popular desktop environments available for Linux users. KDE prioritizes aesthetics and modernity with a user-friendly computing experience. It also comes with a host of applications and features that complete the experience. But which distro does KDE best? I certainly do not know the right answer but what I can do is share some of KDE's best distros in the market now. Some distros certainly do KDE better than others and if you’ve been burnt before, I bet one of these might change your mind. In no particular order, let’s go.

  • Quick Look at Kubuntu Artful Pre-Release

    This is Kubuntu 17.10 Beta 1 "Artful Aardvark", a pre-release version available for development/testing purpose. For you regular users, you are not supposed to install Beta 1 version, unless you want to simply try it and report bugs to Kubuntu Developers. For you not installing I made this short review to see how amazing Kubuntu Artful is already!

  • ERR (En Route to Randa)

    I’m happy to see KDEnlive Joseph and Grace again, and the PIM dudes (although they seem to have slunk off to one of the meeting rooms for Serious Talks already).

    Tomorrow starts at 7:02, when I have kitchen duty to roll out breakfast for 20-or-so Free Software hackers who are hungry from the fresh mountain air, and then after that it’s time to self-organize and sit down to work.

KDE: Fedora's KDE Spin and Upcoming Randa Meetings 2017

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KDE
  • Is Fedora's KDE Spin Too Bloated?

    This weekend on the Fedora mailing list a debate has begun over whether Fedora's KDE desktop spin is too bloated and what could be done about it.

    As most longtime Linux users know, Fedora is mostly centered around the GNOME Shell desktop with its Fedora Workstation, but it does have a vibrant community of maintainers keeping the Fedora KDE spin among other desktop spins active.

    Initiated this weekend on the Fedora development list is a debate about A less "bloated" KDE spin.

  • Randa Meetings 2017: Everything is ready

    Yesterday we went shopping to nourish some Free Software enthusiasts next week.

KDE: Kate & KDevelop, Google Summer of Code Certificate (digiKam), and KBibTeX Progress

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KDE
  • In-pane preview of Qt UI files with KUIViewer coming up

    The “Live Preview” plugin for the editors/IDEs Kate & KDevelop (see introduction) makes use of KParts plugins to support different file formats. Thus it can also pick up the range of existing KParts implementations out there right from the start.

  • Google Summer of Code Certificate

    I just received my certificate of completion and very proud of contributing to digiKam in KDE this summer, and grateful to Google, the people of KDE and my mentors for making this possible.

  • KBibTeX 0.7-beta1

    After some delay, I am finally pushing forward towards a final release of KBibTeX for KDE 4. The first step is the tagging and releasing of tar balls for version 0.7's Beta 1.

KDE and GNOME: Developing KDE PIM with Docker, GObject Introspection, GNOME 3.26 Days Away

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KDE
GNOME
  • Developing KDE PIM with Docker

    Getting started with contributing to KDE PIM can be hard – we have nearly 60 repositories with complicated dependencies – just getting that right can discourage many people from even trying. And then there’s, of course, the risk factor of running development build alongside your production Kontact, endangering your precious emails.

    To address all these issues I have created a Docker image. It’s based on the KDE Neon Developer edition and it has all the dependencies pre-installed and pre-configured and comes with a set of handy shell scripts to make your life easier. It also has the environment set up properly so that you can run the development build of Kontact inside of the container – completely isolated from your production installation.

    Interested now? Follow the instructions how to build the Docker image and how to run the container on our KDE PIM Docker wiki page.

  • The Magic of GObject Introspection

    When we started GNOME in 1997, we didn't want to write all of it in C. We had some inspiration from elsewhere.

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  • Approaching 3.26

    So, we're on final stretch towards the GNOME 3.26 release next week, just released the last beta of Maps (3.25.92) earlier in the week. This cycle hasn't seen that any real ground-breaking user-visible changes. But various smaller bugfixes. Nevertheless there's been a few nice improvements on the surface (as seen in earlier blogposts).

KDE: KDE System Settings, QQC2, GSoC, and Kdenlive

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KDE
  • KDE System Settings is Being Revamped, And It Looks Beautiful

    A dramatic revamp of the KDE System Settings app could be on the way. KDE is — and I doubt anyone will consider this a controversial statement — the most powerful and configurable of all the open-source desktop environments available.

  • KDE System Settings UI Is Still Getting Overhauled

    The GNOME Control Center was revamped this summer and even the Haiku settings area while KDE developers are also working on overhauling their System Settings user-interface.

  • QQC2 Desktop Style Beta Release
  • KDE and Google Summer of Code 2017: Fun, Features, Bugs, Blogs

    While you were enjoying your summer vacation, our Google Summer of Code (GSoC) students were working hard on their projects. They developed new features for KDE software, stomped bugs, wrote blog posts to report on their progress, and still managed to have fun while doing all that. With the final results announcement just around the corner, let's take a look at what the students accomplished in the past three months.

  • Kdenlive development and upcoming events

    Kdenlive’s large cleanup and code refactoring will reach a major milestone with the release of Kdenlive 17.12 in december. The development team has been working hard all year to prepare for this release, and we will merge the code to the master branch in october. As part of the development process, we want to make regular alpha/beta releases to allow interested users to test the development version.

GNOME and KDE: System Settings Progress, Akademy Results, and More

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KDE
GNOME
  • System Settings Progress

    I would like to provide some information on working with System Settings. This is a big endeavor and not an easy one. System Settings is a good expression of the power of KDE and also the many influences that have shaped it over the years.

    Trying to untangle the work that has gone into System Settings requires time and patience. I have always been interested in working in revamping this UI. We worked with the team in the VDG on this some time ago, and altough there were many great and interesting changes, the scope of the work was too great. Therefore, we decided only to move forward with those things that were achievable at the time.

  • Akademy Results

    At the beginning of the summer I went to Akademy in Almeria. So what did it bring, in terms of development? I can point to the FreeBSD-on-KDE-Slimbook posts as one technical result of Akademy, although I suppose I could have just had the machine shipped to me, too. (There need to be more posts about the laptop, as FreeBSD support for it improves; I must admit I’ve been a little lax in hacking on that).

  • Move status icons to your GNOME top bar

    However, there are also free and open source apps with the same issues. These apps haven’t been updated to use newer features when installed in a GNOME environment like Fedora Workstation.

  • GTK, Python, WebKit and Latex Workshops on Fedora 26

    This afternoon, we did two workshops at PUCP, one to present and code in GTK and the other to work with Latex, each one lasted an hour. Thanks to the organizers of INFOSOFT 2017 for the opportunity to share free Software tools to people. This event was free to everyone and we did a volunteer job as a group to promote Fedora and the GNOMe project in our local community.

  • Paying for FOSS apps

    There’s been an ongoing topic in the GNOME community about how developers can get some money for their apps. From a fixed price to pay-what-you-want or donations, getting people to pay for software as end users is not easy. This is true even if you’re selling software through a mainstream platform like Google Play or the Apple Appstore, let alone if you’re a Free Software developer and you are relying on donations from your users.

    Even if you’re willing to donate a couple of euros for supporting an app you’re about to install, you’ll have to go through the trouble of finding out how to make the donation. This may involve: 1) going to the app developer’s website; 2) finding out whether they accept donations; 3) hope they receive donations through a service you already use (PayPal, bank transfer, Bitcoin, etc.) and perform the donation.
    During GUADEC, Richard Hughes organized a discussion around the problems of getting donations through GNOME Software. And now the GNOME app center has a “donate” button for apps that declare a donation link.

To Linux Mint KDE 18.2… and back

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KDE
Linux

Linux Mint KDE is just one of several flavours of Linux Mint, and obviously not the flagship of this distribution.

However, I liked that distribution in my test of the Live version of Linux Mint KDE 18.2. I liked it so much that I decided to give it a go in installed mode.

How was that? Let’s check.

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KDE: GSoC, KDE Messaging, and QtLocation

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KDE
  • In finish line but not in the end

    It's been again a great experience to learn new things, techniques during this GSoC. You can read "but not in the end" in the title, this means that the end of this program shouldn't mean that we quit contributing to open source software. I am sure that all of us had great moments of success during GSoC and I think as we use a lot of software for free we should give something back to the open source community. If it would be possible I would apply again to be a GSoC student again next year or anytime.

  • Results of the Requirements Survey for a KDE-wide Chat Solution

    A week ago, I wrote my previous blog post about a survey I had set up, to figure out how important each of the requirements we had collected for a common IM / chat solution for KDE is for us.

    All in all, 132 people followed my request to participate in the survey, and answered the 108 questions in it. Thank you all for taking the time!

  • Konversation 2.x in 2018: New user interface, Matrix support, mobile version

    It's time to talk about exciting new things in store for the Konversation project!

    Konversation is KDE's chat application for communities. No matter whether someone is a newcomer seeking community, a seasoned participant in one, or a community administrator: our mission is to bring groups of people together, allow them to delight in each other's company, and support their pursuit of shared interests and goals.

    One of the communities we monitor for changes to your needs is our own: KDE. Few things make a Konversation hacker happier than journeying to an event like Akademy in Almería, Spain and seeing our app run on many screens all around.

    The KDE community has recently made progress defining what it wants out of a chat solution in the near future. To us, those initial results align very strongly with Konversation's mission and display a lot of overlap with the things it does well. However, they also highlight trends where the current generation of Konversation falls short, e.g. support for persistence across network jumps, mobile device support and better media/file handling.

    This evolution in KDE's needs matches what we're seeing in other communities we cater to. Recently we've started a new development effort to try and answer those needs.

  • QtLocation 5.9

    It is now possible to rotate and tilt maps. Items on it will be transformed accordingly. In this figure a MapQuickItem embedding a QtMultimedia Video element is used to overlay a video of the shore.

    In addition to this, a new fieldOfView property has been added to the Map, to control the camera field of view when the map is tilted. Note that this property, like the tilt and the zoomLevel properties, have lower and upper bounds. In some cases these bounds will prevent changing the property (e.g., a plug-in using a third-party renderer that does not allow changing the field of view will return a lower bound for the field of view equal to the upper bound).

KDE Plasma 5.10 Desktop Reaches End of Life as Plasma 5.11 Debuts Early October

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KDE

Being a short-lived branch, the KDE Plasma 5.10 desktop environment has reached end of life at the end of August 2017 with the release of the fifth and last maintenance update, versioned 5.10.5.

KDE Plasma 5.10.5 was published last month and includes a total of 40 changes across multiple core components, such as the Plasma Discover graphical package manager, KWin window and composite manager, as well as Plasma Desktop, Plasma Workspace, Plasma Addons, the Plymouth KControl Module, and the KDE hotkeys.

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