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KDE

Plasma 5.9 Kicks off 2017 in Style

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KDE

Tuesday, 31 January 2017. Today KDE releases this year’s first Plasma feature update, Plasma 5.9. While this release brings many exciting new features to your desktop, we'll continue to provide bugfixes to Plasma 5.8 LTS.

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Plasma 5.10: Spring-loading in Folder View; performance work

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KDE

Folder View in Plasma 5.10 will allow you to navigate folders by hovering above them during drag and drop. This is supported in all three modes (desktop layout, desktop widget, panel widget), and pretty damn convenient. It's a well-known feature from Dolphin, of course, and now also supported in Plasma's other major file browsing interface.

Folder View packs a lot of functionality - at some point I should write a tips & tricks blog on some of the lesser known features and how they can improve your workflow.

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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE

Kubuntu 17.04 Alpha 2 released for testers

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KDE

Today the Kubuntu team is happy to announce that Kubuntu Zesty Zapus (17.04) is released today. With this Alpha 2 pre-release, you can see what we are trying out in preparation for 17.04, which we will be releasing in April.

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KDE Leftovers (Slimbook and Qt)

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KDE

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • An Interview with Krita Maintainer, Boudewijn Rempt

    I've always held a deep admiration for the open source movement ever since I first stumbled upon the free 3D creation suite, Blender, many years ago. I'm just really in awe of the many impassioned volunteers who work tirelessly to share in the vision of creating software that is freely available to everyone. One particular program that caught my eye a few years ago was Krita, a free and open source painting program that can be enjoyed by concept artists, matte painters, illustrators, comic artists, and anyone who has ever wanted to dabble in digital painting.

    Krita has grown immensely since I first took notice of it. And now, with Krita in version 3.1 and sporting an excellent new animation feature, it was time I learned more about the work going on behind the scenes to make Krita the stellar free program that it is. I recently spoke with Boudewijn Rempt, who has been the maintainer of Krita since 2004. Here he shares with us what it took to get Krita to where it is now.

  • Size matters not: KDE Slimbooks measure 0.70 inches with sixth-gen Intel CPUs

    The international free software community KDE announced the launch of a KDE-branded laptop on Thursday called the KDE Slimbook. Built for KDE fans across the globe, the new Slimbook promises a highly stable computing experience given that KDE developers are using an identical hardware and software configuration when testing their apps. That means apps and hardware issues are resolved before a new version of KDE’s software is distributed to end users.

  • Meet the KDE branded Slimbook - prices start at €729
  • KDE Slimbook — KDE Launches Its First Dedicated Laptop For Linux Lovers
  • KDE Slimbook Linux Laptop Now Available for Pre-Order with KDE Neon Distro

    KDE's Thomas Pfeiffer was proud to announce today, January 26, 2017, the immediate availability for pre-order of the KDE Slimbook Linux laptop, which comes pre-installed with the latest KDE Plasma 5 desktop and related applications.

    KDE Slimbook is a notebook created by and for the KDE community, for all fans of the KDE desktop environment. The KDE project celebrated 20 years of existence last year in October, and in this honor, they collaborated with Spanish hardware manufacturer Slimbook to create the perfect laptop powered by KDE and GNU/Linux.

More News About KDE Slimbook

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KDE
Hardware
  • Meet the KDE Slimbook, a Powerful Laptop Running KDE Neon

    On the hunt for a powerful new Linux laptop? You might be interested in this, the KDE Slimbbook.

    The KDE Slimbook is a KDE-branded laptop that comes pre-loaded with the Ubuntu-based KDE Neon Linux distribution. The device is not only packed full of the latest and greatest Plasma and KDE apps, but has been tested by KDE developers to ensure that everything runs super-y smooth out of the box, with all hardware support properly configured.

  • New developer features to come with iOS 10.3, KDE Slimbook released, and Node.js certified developer program—SD Times news digest: Jan. 26, 2017
  • KDE Slimbook is a Linux-powered laptop for $780 and up

    The developers of the KDE desktop environment for Linux-based computers have partnered with Spanish PC maker Slimbook to release a laptop that comes with KDE software pre-installed.

    The KDE Slimbook is 13 inch notebook that’s available with up to a Core i7 Skylake processor and which comes wit the KDE Neon operating system.

  • Would you pay $800 for a Linux laptop?

    KDE is one of the bigger Linux projects out there, and today the dev team behind it announced that it would be partnering with Slimbook (a Spanish PC company) to produce the KDE Slimbook, a laptop designed specifically for running KDE Neon.

    The driving idea behind the project was to help alleviate the biggest issue facing Linux distributions: hardware compatibility. Where a company like Apple simply can ensure that its hardware and software work in sync by controlling both of those aspects, and Microsoft’s Windows has hefty licensing fees and requirements to ensure that hardware partners provide proper drivers and support, Linux, by virtue of being an independent and open-source platform, can be far more difficult to get working on different hardware. The usual method for getting Linux on a computer typically involves trawling forums, following how-to guides, and hoping that another member of the community has tried the setup or encountered the issue that you’re working on.

KDE Slimbook and Other Qt/KDE News

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KDE
  • Slimbook
  • KDE Slimbook

    Naturally, as one of the neon developers, I was doing some software work to help this along. Last year already we switched to a more reliable graphics driver. Our installer got a face-lift to make it more visually appealing. The installer gained an actually working OEM installation mode. A hardware integration feature was added to our package pool to make sure the KDE Slimbook works perfectly out of the box.

  • Everything you need to know about the SLIMBOOK KDE laptop

    Founded by Alejandro López, Grupo Odín is a small business in Spain that sells high-quality laptops with Linux preloaded on them. Their goal is not to make a lot of money, but to bring Linux to more users.

    A majority of desktop Linux users buy Windows laptops, wipe the hard drive and install Linux on them. But then they are on their own with no support from the company that sold them the laptop. By contrast, López offers complete support for his hardware.

    Jens Reuterberg, an illustrator and designer who works with the KDE community, told me that the idea for the SLIMBOOK KDE came from Aleix Pol, vice president at KDE eV Board. Pol talked to López exploring the possibility of a KDE-powered SLIMBOOK and López was more happy to oblige. He worked with the KDE community members to create a laptop to their specifications.

  • KDE-Community veröffentlicht Laptop mit eigener Distro
  • There's Now A KDE-Branded Laptop Running Neon With Plasma 5

    For KDE fans not interested in setting up a KDE-based Linux distribution on your own laptop and worrying about potential graphics driver bugs with Plasma or other possible headaches, there is now a "KDE laptop" backed by the KDE community.

    KDE has teamed up with Spanish computer hardware retailer Slimbook to offer the KDE Slimbook. It's an Intel laptop preloaded with KDE Neon and thus running the latest KDE Frameworks 5 + Plasma 5 experience. This isn't a laptop running Coreboot or the like or any other real innovations besides just being pre-loaded with KDE Neon and tested by KDE Developers to ensure you don't run into any hardware troubles, etc.

  • Krita Devs Want to Know What Type of Hardware You're Using for Digital Painting

    The Krita developers are currently working on a lot of goodies for the next major version of the popular, open-source, and multiplatform digital painting utility, which can be either Krita 3.2 or 4.0, depending on the amount of changes made.

    They are preparing exciting features like Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) support, text tools, Python scripting, as well as on improving existing functionality like the Lazy Brush interactive colorizing tool and palette handling. However, they are also planning on fixing as many bugs as possible to stabilize the application.

  • KIO GDrive 1.1 released

    One problem with this new approach is that the Network “folder” is actually provided by a kioslave, which currently lives in plasma-workspace. This means that if you use Dolphin from, say, Gnome Shell then Network will probably not work.

    The proper fix is moving this ioslave from plasma-workspace to kio, but it’s not trivial because Plasma and Frameworks have different release schedules, and also because in general moving things around is painful. I already made a patch but it got stuck, possibly because of Plasma 5.9 deadlines. I’ll clean it up and revamp it in the next weeks, hopefully.

    I also want to thank Andreas for the new gdrive icon that you see in the screenshots above. You need breeze-icons 5.29 or later to get it.

  • Un-deprecate your Qt project

    I personally feel that this was caused fundamentally by a perceived threat: there is a cost associated to porting away a codebase from a well-known construct (Q_FOREACH) to a new and yet-undiscovered construct (C++11’s range based for), especially when the advantages are not that clear. (With stronger advantages, maybe people would be more keen to move away).

KDE and Slimbook Release a Laptop for KDE Fans

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KDE

Today KDE is proud to announce the immediate availability of the KDE Slimbook, a KDE-branded laptop that comes pre-installed with Plasma and KDE Applications (running on Linux) and is assured to work with our software as smoothly as possible.

The KDE Slimbook allows KDE to offer our users a laptop which has been tested directly by KDE developers, on the exact same hardware and software configuration that the users get, and where any potential hardware-related issues have already been ironed out before a new version of our software is shipped to them. This gives our users the best possible way to experience our software, as well as increasing our reach: The easier it is to get our software into users' hands, the more it will be used.

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KDE Leftovers

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KDE

  • Qt Creator 4.2.1 released

    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.2.1. This is a pure bugfix release, and takes care of various important bugs.

  • KTextEditor depends on KSyntaxHighlighting

    Recently, the KSyntaxHighlighting framework was added to the KDE Frameworks 5.29 release. And starting with KDE Frameworks 5.29, KTextEditor depends on KSyntaxHighlighting. This also means that KTextEditor now queries KSyntaxHighlighting for available xml highlighting files.

  • [Krita] Interview with Adam

    Good day. My name is Adam and I am a 26-year-old person who is trying to learn how to draw…

  • [Krita] We’re doing a User Survey!

    While we’re still working on Vector, Text and Python Scripting, we’ve already decided: This year, we want to spend on stabilizing and polishing Krita!

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

  • A Minimal Chrome OS Theme for Tint2
    I used to (and sort-of-still-do, I guess) run a sister site focused on Google Chrome, Chromecast and Chromebooks, i.e. the Chrome ecosystem. As such I am a fan of Chromebooks and Chrome OS, a Linux-based distribution based on Gentoo. The appearance of Chrome OS has waxed and waned in sync with Google’s ambitions and positioning for the OS, going form hyper-minimal to a full desktop clone (with the desktop-y Chrome Apps platform) through to a Material Design inspired Android + Chrome hybrid today.
  • Off-The-Shelf Hacker: Linux for Cheap Hardware, Then and Now
    Most people, don’t realize how prolific Linux has become. With the Embedded Linux Conference just a week away, I’ve been reflecting on how Linux has provided a sort of computing “circle of life” experience for me. It’s powered my computational hardware 20 years ago and continues to do so today.
  • [Video] XPS 13 Review | Linux Action Show 457
  • GParted 0.28.1
    This release of GParted restores the ability to move/resize primary partitions when an extended partition exists. The move/resize regression was introduced in version 0.28.0. This release also includes some minor bug fixes.
  • Antergos Linux : The beauty built on Arch
    Hi guys, welcome to the 16th segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro". Most of us know or heard about Arch Linux, which is one of the most widely used Linux distribution. For some reason, few users find it hard to install and use Arch. But in Linux world, there is almost always some alternative to your desired distribution. In today's segment, we will be introducing an Arch-based distribution which turned it completely on user-friendly side. So, let's get to know about Antergos Linux.

Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

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