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KDE

digiKam 5.1.0 Releases

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KDE
Software
  • digiKam 5.1.0 is published...

    After a first release 5.0.0 published one month ago, the digiKam team is proud to announce the new release 5.1.0 of digiKam Software Collection. This version introduces a new huge bugs triage and some fixes following first feedback from end-users.

  • KDE DigiKam 5.1 Released With Bug Fixes, New RAW Camera Support

    The first update following the major digiKam 5.0 release is now available.

  • digiKam 5.1.0 RAW Image Editor Brings Support for Samsung Galaxy S7, New Cameras

    The development team behind digiKam, a popular open-source and cross-platform RAW image editor, viewer and organizer for KDE and Qt-based desktop environments and operating systems, announced today, August 9, 2016, the release of digiKam 5.1.0.

    digiKam 5.1.0 is the first maintenance update since the release of the major digiKam 5.0.0 milestone that brought numerous new features and dozens of improvements to the open-source image editor software used by many GNU/Linux users around the world on their KDE desktop environments.

KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • Rainbow Folders

    Breeze Icons follow the colorscheme that’s not new but now the folder icons also follow the color scheme.

  • QRPC: A Qt remoting library

    This project of mine has been around for quite a while already. I’ve never much publicised it, however, and for the past year the code hasn’t seen any changes (until a few days ago, anyway). But related to my current job, I’ve found a new need for remote procedure calls, so I came back to the code after all.

  • Qt 5.8 Is Preparing For Its Feature Freeze

    Qt developers are preparing for the feature-freeze of the upcoming Qt 5.8 tool-kit.

    The branching of "dev" to "5.8" is happening with developers preparing for Qt 5.8 to set out on its final course ahead of the official release later this year. The actual feature freeze is set to happen one week from today on 15 August.

    Qt developers concerned about the logistics of the 5.8 branching can see this mailing list post.

  • My experiences with SOCIS 2016

    This post is a small synopsis of my experiences so far as a student in this years Summer of Code in Space, where I shall recount the whole adventure of integrating Sentinel-2 data into Marble Virtual Globe.

KDE Applications 16.08 Up to Release Candidate State, Testers Are Needed

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KDE

The development of the next major release of KDE Applications 16.08, a software suite designed for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment, continues with the Release Candidate build.

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Steam and KDE on FreeBSD

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KDE
BSD
Gaming
  • Script Makes It Easy To Deploy Steam On FreeBSD

    With a new script, it's possible to get Valve's Steam Linux game client running relatively well on FreeBSD.

    On FreeBSD in conjunction with its Linux binary compatibility layer it's possible to run Steam for handling your favorite Steam Linux titles. If you are unfamiliar with FreeBSD's Linux compatibility layer, see FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux?. That article has background information along with some Linux vs. FreeBSD gaming benchmarks I did five years ago... When FreeBSD 11.0 is out, I'll try again to get it working to see how FreeBSD 11 performs for running Linux native games.

  • Time flies for FBSD updates, too

    The older KDE stuff — that is, KDE4, which is still the current official release for the desktop on FreeBSD — is also maintained, although (obviously) not much changes there. We did run into a neat C++-exceptions bug recently, which was kind of hard to trigger: running k3b (or ksoundconverter and some other similar ones) with a CD that is unknown to MusicBrainz would crash k3b. There’s not that many commercially-available CDs unknown to that database, so I initially brushed off the bug report as Works For Me.

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • [GSoC] KDev-Embedded, OpenOCD and avrdude

    KDev-Embedded now have OpenOCD integration and a new interface to use avrdude in launcher.

    With Arduino-Makefile, it's possible to use a makefile to perform compilation of Arduino projects. In the video one the the examples are used to shows how it is possible to use the new avrdude launcher to execute the upload process.

  • Kontact build dependencies
  • WIP: Plasma World Map Wallpaper & World Clock Applet, powered by Marble

    The core of Marble, the virtual globe and world atlas, is a library, intended for reuse. Next to exposing its native C++ interface (see API dox of development version of the Marble library), there is also the option to use it in a QtQuick variant.

    The Marble code repository itself holds a few application and tools based on the library. Additionally it also has extensions & plugins for other applications & workspaces, like the KIO thumbnailer plugins for previews of KML, KMZ, GPX & GEOJSON files in KIO-using file manager or file dialogs, a Plasma Runner plugin for looking up geo coordinates or a world clock Plasma applet.

  • GNOME Maps and the tile problem

    The GNOME project's Maps application provides access to an array of mapping features (trip routing, address lookup, zoomable maps, etc.) from the desktop. Implementing that feature set requires hooking into a number of online services, but none of them is as prominent as the map tiles—the background images on top of which everything else is added in overlays. Recently, the tile provider that had served GNOME Maps well for several years ended its free service, suddenly cutting off all of GNOME Maps's users and forcing developers to consider new approaches for the future.

  • Yes, Someone Has Ported The Arc GTK Theme to Windows

    Last month we featured an Ubuntu theme for Windows 10 called Maverick — and a lot of you were pretty bemused by it. That theme aimed to bring the familiar look of Ubuntu and its Ambiance theme to the Windows 10 desktop. And, for the most part, does a decent job of aping the appearance.

KDE Leftovers

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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.7.3 Improves Plasma Desktop and Discover, Fixes VPN Issues

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Development
KDE

The KDE project has had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the third of five maintenance releases for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment.

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KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Kdenlive on Windows

    For the past few weeks, we have been working hard to make Kdenlive work on Windows. Cross compiling using MXE has been an awesome journey Smile, requiring us to cross compile most of Kdenlive's dependencies (KDE Frameworks, MLT etc) for Windows.

    With a lot of help from Vincent and Jean-Baptiste, we have had success in building Kdenlive, MLT and all other dependencies for Windows. All that is left is just debugging a few issues on app startup, creation of the Windows installer script and we will be good to go.

  • Almost there… – Google Summer of Code
  • Gsoc 2016 Neverland #8 #9

    I spent almost a week to refactoring the code. I’m using ES6 syntax and it is supporting class inheritance. One of my concern is Javascript is prototype-based object oriented programming. I’m still not sure about using Class or Prototype inheritance in Neverland. I havent decided yet so there are still redundant parts in the code base.

  • Maps has tiles again
  • GNOME Maps Should Now Work Again, Switches From Mapquest To Mapbox

    The GNOME Maps program has seen update in the GNOME 3.14/3.16/3.18/3.20/3.21 series with new releases to change its tiling provider so that the mapping program will work once again.

    GNOME Maps had been relying upon Mapquest for providing the maps/tiles, but they changed their service around and thus broke GNOME Maps support in the process. GNOME developers weren't notified in advance so were left out in the cold when they lost Mapquest access.

KDE Leftovers

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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.7.2 Introduces Lots of Plasma Workspace Improvements, KWin Fixes

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KDE

KDE released the second maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment series, which has already been adopted by several popular GNU/Linux operating systems.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Free Hadoop and Spark Training Options Spread Out
    In the tech job market race these days, hardly any trend is drawing more attention than Big Data. And, when talking Big Data, the subject of Hadoop inevitably comes up, but Spark is becoming an increasingly popular topic. IBM and other companies have made huge commitments to Spark, and workers who have both Hadoop and Spark skills are much in demand. With that in mind MapR Technologies and other providers are offering free Hadoop and Spark training. In many cases, the training is available online and on-demand, so you can learn at your own pace.
  • Git hooks, a cloud by the numbers, and more OpenStack news
    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.
  • Improving phpMyAdmin Docker container
    Since I've created the phpMyAdmin container for Docker I've always felt strange about using PHP's built in web server there. It really made it poor choice for any production setup and probably was causing lot of problems users saw with this container. During the weekend, I've changed it to use more complex setup with Supervisor, nginx and PHP FPM. As building this container is one of my first experiences with Docker (together with Weblate container), it was not as straightforward as I'd hope for, but in the end is seems to be working just fine. While touching the code, I've also improved testing of the Docker container to tests all supported setups and to better report in case of test fails.
  • Support open source motion comic
    There is an ongoing campaign for motion comic. It will be done entirely with FLOSS tools (Blender, Krita, GNU/Linux) and besides that, it really looks great (and no, it is not only for the kids!). Please support this effort if you can because it also shows the power of Free software tools. All will be released Creative Commons Atribution-ShareAlike license together with all sources.
  • GNU APL 1.6 released
    I am happy to announce that GNU APL 1.6 has been released.
  • Italian guide on government websites to be updated
    The source of the document is now available on GitHub, a cloud-based source code management system.
  • Ethiopia’s Lucy is Now Open Source: Famous Bones’ 3D Scans Released
    The world’s most famous fossil is now open source. 3D scans of Lucy — a 3.18-million-year-old hominin found in Ethiopia — were released on 29 August, allowing anyone to examine her arm, shoulder and knee bones and even make their own 3D-printed copies.s
  • How to use open source information to investigate stories online
    Myself and others at First Draft frequently receive emails from a whole range of people asking how they can start doing the sort of online open source investigation and verification that they’ve seen us doing. The skills and methodologies used are all something that can be learnt through a little persistence, but here are a few pieces of advice to get you started.
  • Microsoft relies on Wikipedia and loses Melbourne
    Microsoft’s Bing made the grave mistake on relying on data collected by Wikipedia for its mapping software and lost Melbourne. While Melbourne might not be the nicest it place to live, there were a fair few who felt that Bing Maps moving it to the wrong hemisphere was not exactly fair dinkum. Apparently Vole made the mistake when it collected the data. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, said that the outfit does not normally rely that much on Wackypedia, but sometimes it uses it.
  • Free education resources from Curriki and Sankoré wikis
    From the days of Gutenberg, technology has been linked to education. Curriki and Sankoré use open source to bring high-quality education to people who need it, and otherwise cannot access it.
  • You don't need a green thumb with this farming robot
    FarmBot is a robotic open hardware system that assists anyone with a small plot of land and a desire to grow food with planting, watering, soil testing, and weeding. It uses a Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and other awesome components, including weather-resistant materials.

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.