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KDE

Official KDE Plasma 5.12 Release Now in Tumbleweed

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KDE
SUSE

KDE Plasma 5.12 transitioned from it beta version of 5.11.95 to the official release in an openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot earlier this week.

On the same day of the upstream release, Tumbleweed snapshot 20180206 brought the new desktop software to its thousands of rolling release users. Improved performance and several new features are available in Plasma 5.12 like Wayland-only Night Color feature that allows adjustments to the screen color temperature to reduce eye strain and the System Activity and System Monitor display per-process graphs for the CPU usage. The new KDE Store offers a wide selection of addons that are ready to be installed. Plasma 5.12 is the second long-term support (LTS) release from the Plasma 5 team and will be the version used in openSUSE’s traditional distribution openSUSE Leap 15, which is expected to be released this spring.

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Also: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Already Shipping KDE Plasma 5.12, Mesa 18.0

OpenSUSE Leap 15 Will Ship With Plasma Wayland Option

The New KDE Slimbook II: A sleek and powerful Plasma-based Ultrabook

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KDE

To start with, it comes with a choice between an Intel i5: 2.5 GHz Turbo Boost 3.1 GHz - 3M Cache CPU, or an Intel i7: 2.7 GHz Turbo Boost 3.5 GHz with a 4M Cache. This makes the KDE Slimbook II 15% faster on average than its predecessor. The RAM has also been upgraded, and the KDE Slimbook now sports 4, 8, or 16 GBs of DDR4 RAM which is 33% faster than the DDR3 RAM installed on last year's model.

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KDE: KMyMoney 5.0.0, Plasma 5.12, Qt Creator 4.6 Beta, AtCore

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KDE
  • KMyMoney 5.0.0 released

    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present version 5.0.0 of its open source Personal Finance Manager.

    As with every release, the KMyMoney development team has been working hard to make this release better and easier to use in every way. We have also made quite a few improvements. We are confident you will like what you see.

    The largest amount of work has gone towards basing this version on KDE Frameworks. Many of the underlying libraries used by the application have been reorganized and improved, but most of that is behind the scenes, and not directly visible to the end user. Some of the general look and feel may have changed, but the basic functionality of the program remains the same, aside from intentional improvements and additions.

  • KMyMoney 5.0 Released, Ported To KDE Frameworks 5

    KMyMoney, the KDE personal finance manager program, has reached version 5.0 and with that big "5" release it's been ported to KDE Frameworks 5.

    KMyMoney 5.0 is now running on KDE Frameworks 5 and the many changes involved there with adapting to new/updated libraries. There has also been bug fixes along the way, improvements to generating money reports, support for logarithmic axes in report graphics, support for more currencies, and a variety of bug fixes both user-facing and other internal code improvements.

  • Plasma 5.12 LTS is in KDE neon User Editions

    Plasma 5.12 LTS was launched today after some months focusing on speed and stability of the original and best Linux desktop.

    We’ve updated the packages in KDE neon User Edition and in KDE neon User LTS Edition. The installable image is also updated.

  • Plasma 5.12.0

    Plasma 5.12 LTS is the second long-term support release from the Plasma 5 team. We have been working hard, focusing on speed and stability for this release. Boot time to desktop has been improved by reviewing the code for anything which blocks execution. The team has been triaging and fixing bugs in every aspect of the codebase, tidying up artwork, removing corner cases, and ensuring cross-desktop integration. For the first time, we offer our Wayland integration on long-term support, so you can be sure we will continue to provide bug fixes and improvements to the Wayland experience.

  • The future of distros

    Today KDE released Plasma 5.12 with Long Term Support–the culmination of more than a year of work. It’s really awesome, and we think you’ll love it!

  • Qt Creator 4.6 Beta released

    The possibly most noteworthy and least directly visible change is that we upgraded the backend for the Clang code model from Clang 3.9 to Clang 5.0. This enables support for many C++17 features that were not available in Clang 3.9. The Clang code model is not used by default. Open Help > About Plugins (Qt Creator > About Plugins on macOS) and turn on the ClangCodeModel plugin to enable it.

  • Qt Creator 4.6 Beta Rolls Out With C++17 Features, Navigation Improvements

    The Qt Company this morning announced the beta availability of the Qt Creator 4.6 integrated development environment.

    While it has been two months to the day since the Qt Creator 4.5 release, there is a fair amount of changes in store for the Qt Creator 4.6 release.

    Thanks to Qt Creator 4.6 Beta upgrading its Clang code model back-end from v3.9 to v5.0, there is now support for many more C++17 features. Qt Creator 4.6 also now allows for integrating Clang-Tidy and Clazy warnings into diagnostic messages within the C++ editor.

  • AtCore: 100 Downloads \o/

    Last week we made the first release of AtCore. But before that, we left AtCore on the beta version for more than a month until the 1.0 release. With the 3 months that AtCore is out for public use, we didn’t receive any bug report, but a lot of congrats and feature requests.

Qt Creator 4.6 Beta released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.6 Beta!
C++ Support

The possibly most noteworthy and least directly visible change is that we upgraded the backend for the Clang code model from Clang 3.9 to Clang 5.0. This enables support for many C++17 features that were not available in Clang 3.9. The Clang code model is not used by default. Open Help > About Plugins (Qt Creator > About Plugins on macOS) and turn on the ClangCodeModel plugin to enable it.

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Also: Qt Creator 4.6 Beta Rolls Out With C++17 Features, Navigation Improvements

KDE/GNOME: Qt, WikiToLearn, GNOME Shell and GTK

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KDE
GNOME
  • Sharing Files on Android or iOS from or with your Qt App – Part 3
  • WikiToLearn migration, why?

    Well, currently WikiToLearn runs on MediaWiki, which is a good model for dealing with an encyclopedia but, when you are trying to build a more structured content, it doesn’t fit.

    For the release 1.0 we have developed CourseEditor, which tries to make the unstructured content more structured, for example offering a drag-and-drop UI to manage a course structure.

  • On-Screen Keyboard Improvements, Thunderbolt UI Land In GNOME Shell

    Last minute work ahead of the imminent UI/feature freeze for GNOME 3.28 landed on Monday for the GNOME Shell.

    Most notable to the work that landed on Monday is the Thunderbolt policy provider and indicator. These are the UI/shell elements to Red Hat's Bolt project for dealing with secure handling of Thunderbolt peripherals when connected to Linux systems. The GNOME Shell bits interface with the Bolt daemon via the org.freedesktop.bolt D-Bus service. Great to see this UI work land in time for GNOME 3.28.

  • GTK+ 4.0 Gets More House Cleaning, Dropping Old Version References Saves ~7k L.O.C

    Yesterday I wrote about GTK4 dropping the Mir display back-end in favor of the Wayland back-end. Additionally, the "big GDK lock" was also stripped out. The latest is some additional cleaning to lighten the tool-kit code-base by about seven thousand lines of code.

    The latest significant cleanup is removing old GTK 2.x/3.x version references in the code and documentation. By dropping these old version annotations, GTK+ 4.0 saw nearly eight thousand lines of code removed but just over one thousand new insertions across more than 400 files.

Plasma 5.12 arrives in backport PPA for Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark

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KDE

Users of Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark can now update to the newly released Plasma 5.12.0 via our backports PPA.

See the Plasma 5.12 release announcement and the release video below for more about the new features available.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Released With Much Better Wayland Support, Other Improvements

Plasma 5.12 is out, and it is faster, stabler, and has more features than ever

KDE and GNOME: WikiToLearn , Krita, GTK, and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • MongoDB for WikiToLearn migration

    Today i want to talk about my experience with the WikiToLearn migration.

    The problem of every migration is getting your hands on the data in a way such that you can work on it.

    Starting from the mysql backend and trying to have everything into a versioned object storage (python eve is the one we are tring now) is not an option.

    The solution is to use a temporary database to keep the data, process the data in this temporary storage and afterwards uploading everything in the destination.

    After some tries we managed to have the pipeline that reads all the MediaWiki pages, parses the structure and uploads everything in eve, using mongodb as a temporary storage.

  • [Krita] Interview with Owly Owlet

    Hello. I’m Maria, more often I use my nickname: Owly Owlet. I have a youtube channel, where I make video tutorials (in Russian) about how to use art software, mostly Krita.

  • GTK4 Ejects The Mir Backend & Drops The Big GDK Lock

    After adding the Mir back-end for the GTK+ 3.16 cycle, GTK+ 4.0 is dropping this back-end for the Canonical-developed display server.

    The Mir back-end has been removed from the latest GTK+ code. This clears out about 6,500 lines of code from the tool-kit's codebase. The removal of the Mir back-end is coming since Mir has been focusing on Wayland protocol support to which GTK+ has more mature Wayland support than Mir. Since Mir's change of focus last year and the work the past number of months, the Wayland support on Mir has become more viable.

  • Ibus-Hangul and Compose key: the incredible journey of a simple patch

    Today I decided to tell how I reported a bug (then ended up fixing it) on a non-GIMP related project. Well I do regularly this kind of stuff, and this could have just been one more of these silent commits to a random project as I did many times in my life. But since I decided recently to post more articles, well… I may as well tell a story as one-time contributor (as opposed to “regular contributor”) for once!

    Also I think the whole process of reporting a bug on projects you don’t know at all — worse! A whole stack of software you don’t know much! — is quite interesting for people wondering how they should report bugs happening to them.

  • On GNOME 3.27.90, time management, and a goodbye

    It’s been a long time I don’t write here. These past months were excruciatingly busy and intense, and lots of things happened but I didn’t manage to keep up with the blog posts. I’ll try to condense everything that happened and is still happening and will happen here.

Why KDE's Plasma Mobile is the ideal platform for Linux fans and developers

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KDE
Linux

For the last decade, the mobile market has been under complete lockdown. Unless you were Android or iOS, you didn't stand a chance at making much of a run at success. Canonical failed miserably with the Ubuntu Phone. Blackberry had to resort to their own take on Android. Firefox OS couldn't even get off the ground.

And yet, thanks to the Purism Librem 5, there's another attempt at creating an open source mobile platform on the horizon. Many of us prognosticators and pundits have been ansty to see what's to come for this platform, and finally someone has made some headway, and that's KDE. The platform is Plasma Mobile. From the looks of it, KDE is on to something.

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KDE: FOSDEM, Plasma Vault, KDE's Elisa

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KDE
  • The future, the past and FOSDEM

    Writing these lines I’m sitting in a train to Brussels. So if you want to meet up and talk about anything, you will presumably often find me the next two days at the KDE booth or on Saturday in the graphics devroom. But this is my first time at FOSDEM, so maybe I’ll just stand somewhere in between and am not able to orientate myself anymore. In this case please lead me back to the KDE booth. Thanks in advance and I look forward to meeting you and other interesting people in the next two days at FOSDEM.

  • Plasma Vault: Update on CryFS

    Just a short update on the CryFS situation I mentioned a few days ago.

    I was contacted by Sebastian (the maintainer of CryFS) and he said he has been actively working on the solution to the upgrading problem.

    He has already implemented quite a few things that will be useful for Plasma Vault, and I will make the CryFS backend default again in Plasma 5.13 (after the LTS release) if these updates get released and packaged by the most popular distributions.

  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Reaches Its Second Alpha

    There is no shortage of different KDE music/media player projects over the years but one of the most promising in recent times is Elisa. This week marks the second alpha release for the Elisa music player.

    Elisa was only announced last year as a new music player initiative building atop Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5 while following the KDE VDG style guidelines, etc. Back in December marked the first alpha release while coming out yesterday was the second alpha for Elisa.

Kraft Moving to KDE Frameworks: Beta Release!

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KDE

Kraft is KDE/Qt based desktop software to manage documents like quotes and invoices in the small business. It focuses on ease of use through an intuitive GUI, a well chosen feature set and ensures privacy by keeping data local.

Kraft is around for more than twelve years, but it has been a little quiet recently. However, Kraft is alive and kicking!

I am very happy to announce the first public beta version of Kraft V. 0.80, the first Kraft version that is based on KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5.x.

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OSS Leftovers

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    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
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  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

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