Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KDE Plasma 5.10 Desktop Reaches End of Life as Plasma 5.11 Debuts Early October

Filed under
KDE

Being a short-lived branch, the KDE Plasma 5.10 desktop environment has reached end of life at the end of August 2017 with the release of the fifth and last maintenance update, versioned 5.10.5.

KDE Plasma 5.10.5 was published last month and includes a total of 40 changes across multiple core components, such as the Plasma Discover graphical package manager, KWin window and composite manager, as well as Plasma Desktop, Plasma Workspace, Plasma Addons, the Plymouth KControl Module, and the KDE hotkeys.

Read more

KDE: Krita Interview with Miri, Rust Qt Binding Generator, and Digital Electricity

Filed under
KDE
  • Interview with Miri

    I made the switch to Linux in early 2016, finding out that Sai and CS6 wouldn’t be available unless I used WINE to emulate them, I just started looking for a free software that fit my taste. GIMP was okay, but it had a few quirks I couldn’t really iron out, and it was a bit simple for me. I think I found out about Krita through an art thread on some imageboard for taking requests, tried it out, it ran like a smoother SAI and I haven’t looked back.

  • Rust Qt Binding Generator

    This code generator gets you started quickly to use Rust code from Qt and QML. In other words, it helps to create a Qt based GUI on top of Rust code.

    Qt is a mature cross-platform graphical user interface library. Rust is a new programming language with strong compile time checks and a modern syntax.

  • GSoC- Final month analysis

    So, the final month of GSoC just wrapped up, and in this post I will be talking about the last month, the implementation of tutorial mode for the Digital Electricity activity.

KaOS 2017.09

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

As always with this rolling distribution, you will find the very latest packages for the Plasma Desktop, this includes Frameworks 5.37.0, Plasma 5.10.5, KDE Applications 17.08.0 & not yet released ports of KDE Applications. All built on Qt 5.9.1. New is the addition of preview plugins to Kate/Kwrite (also usable in KDevelop), which when enabled turns Kate into full fledged Markdown editor.

Read more

KDE: Google Summer of Code, kdenlive, Neon, Latte Dock, Digikam

Filed under
KDE
  • Farewell GSoC’17

    It has been a great journey, thanks to my mentor, KDE and digiKam coordinators, and great community for the continuous feedback and the encouraging comments. I’m proud to be contributing to this great software and planning to continue.

  • Autumn is here (wait, this is GSoC, not GoT)

    So, as summer is coming to an end, Google Summer of Code is also wrapping up, and the KDevelop Rust plugin is looking good at this point. It now supports semantic highlighting, go-to-definition, renaming declarations, some code completion, debugging, highlighting code errors, and code formatting. I'll go into a bit more detail for the last three since they were the most recent additions. 

    I also focused on a lot of minor improvements this past month to make the plugin easier to build and use, to make it more reliable, etc., so at this point kdev-rust is a solid basis for anyone looking for a Rust IDE.

  • [kdenlive] Design choices ahead

    As many of you may know by now, we are currently doing a code refactoring which will be taking a step forward in making our software more suitable for professional use. In the process, we are facing some critical design choices, and want to hear the opinion of the editors of the community.

  • RX Vega + AMDGPU-PRO + KDE Neon

    Earlier this week I got my dirty hands on an RX Vega 64 card to run on my daily workstation. With the aim to eventually run open drivers in the future my main goal for now was to get AMDGPU-PRO running for day-to-day activities, possibly also moving to Wayland from X11. I’m very interested in Wayland as Kwin has several Wayland-only enhancements, and even if I wouldn’t use it now I wanted to be ready for testing.  The Vega card would be replacing an Nvidia GTX 1080 card.

  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.1

    Latte Dock v0.7.1  has been released containing many important fixes and improvements for which you can find more details in the end of the article.

  • KDE: Libmediawiki has been released!
  • KDE: New release for Libkvkontakte!

    The release enables distribution packagers to enable the new features in the latest Digikam release.

Events: GNOME 3.26 "Manchester", GUADEC 2017, Randa Roundup, and SRECon17 Europe

Filed under
KDE
OSS
GNOME
  • Waiting for GNOME 3.26 Stable Release!

    GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" planned to be released at 13 September 2017. Reading the FeaturePlans and Schedule from its wiki makes me want to run it sooner! I hope Ubuntu will successfully include 3.26 on Artful Aardvark release so I can make a review for it later. However, this short article mentions some of its new feature, new apps, some links from GUADEC 2017's participants, and further GNOME links. Enjoy!

  • GNOME GUADEC 2017: Presentations, Videos, & Links

    GUADEC 2017, the latest GNOME Project annual conference, has been held at 28 July-2 August 2017 in Manchester, United Kingdom. I collect as many resources as possible here including presentations & videos (so you can download them), poster & template, write-ups by attendees, and of course the links about GUADEC 2017. So, if you didn't attend GUADEC 2017, you still can find the resources here! Enjoy!

  • Randa Roundup - Part I

    Our intrepid developers are getting ready to make their way to Randa, and we are gradually finding out what they will be doing up there in the Swiss mountains.

    As Valorie said in a recent blog post, accessibility is useful for everybody at some point or another. Clear, highly contrasted icons, easy to reach keyboard shortcuts, and scalable fonts are things we can all appreciate most of the time, whether we have any sort of physical disability or not.

    With that in mind, Jean-Baptiste Mardelle will be working on Kdenlive, KDE's video editing software. He'll be reviewing the user interface; that is, the different panels, toolbars, etc., to make it easier to use for people who start editing for the first time. He'll also be working on packaging - creating AppImages and Flatpaks - so the latest versions of Kdenlive can be installed anywhere without having to worry about dependencies.

  • Takeaways from SRECon17 Europe

    As every last three years in a row, I attended SRECon in Europe. I can literally say this year was totally broken comparing with former conferences. I think it’s because I had much higher expectations from this conference. The first shot in 2014 was more than awesome, but year to year it’s getting worse. Almost all talks from Google were like a summary of every chapter in SRE book. We just skipped all the rest of the talks sourced by Google.

KDE's Leaner Experience On openSUSE Tumbleweed vs. Ubuntu 17.04

Filed under
KDE
SUSE
Ubuntu

With the Power Use, RAM + Boot Times With Unity, Xfce, GNOME, LXDE, Budgie and KDE Plasma tests this week, many expressed frustration over the heavy KDE packaging on Ubuntu leading to the inflated results for the Plasma 5 desktop tests. For some additional reference, here is how KDE Plasma (and GNOME Shell) compare when running on Ubuntu 17.04 vs. openSUSE Tumbleweed.

Read more

Kubuntu Artful beta 1 milestone released today

Filed under
KDE

I'm happy to announce that Kubuntu Artful beta 1 milestone released today, having passed all the mandatory testing, thanks to lots of testers! Thanks so much to each of you.

If possible, we'll also be participating in Beta 2 with the next round of KDE bug-fix releases for the last testing milestone before release of Kubuntu 17.10 on 19 October 2017.

Release notes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/Beta1/Kubuntu

Read more

Also: Lubuntu Artful Aardvark Beta 1 has been released!

Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Beta Released

KDE: Plasma 5.10.5, Falkon, Polkit Support in KIO, KTorrent 5.1, SDDM 0.15

Filed under
KDE

KDE: GSoC Projects and Belated Akademy 2017 Coverage

Filed under
KDE
  • GSoC - Third month analysis

    My aim was to work on note names and piano composition and those are the most basic activies kids need to learn. A child should learn note names first to have a good understanding of note position and naming convention. Then the activity piano composition should be played to have the knowledge of musical notation and musical staff, then comes the play piano activity which explains how the piano keyboard can play music as written on musical staff and then the rhythms are learnt on the basis of what they see and hear in play rhythm. In the last two weeks I worked on completing Note names which you can test in my branch note names.

  • GSoC Final report - Part 1: Okular

    This is the first post of a 3-part series where I will go into technical details of my summer of code project. I will give a high-level overview about the current state of my written code, show you what’s supposed to work and how you can try that; and what still needs to be done.

    Then I will write about some “Gotcha!” moments I have experienced in the past few months and what I could learn from them. Those aren’t in any way ordered and are there to explain why my project turned out like it did - and hopefully even help some future GSoC students along the way.

  • GSoC Final report - Part 2: Gwenview

    A first revision of my patch is up on phabricator, which works for raster graphics. Your holiday pictures should now open in all their details and no longer be a blurry mess!

  • GSoC Final report - Part 3: Summary

    I can’t believe the three months are already over, the time flies when you’re having fun.

    Unfortunately, I couldn’t tackle everything I had planned - the rendering in Okular and Gwenview was much complexer than I anticipated. Once again, it needs much more time to modify existing code than to write new one.

    Nevertheless, I enjoyed this challenge and hope the code for Okular will be merged in the next days and can therefore be in the next release - making HiDPI a more pleasant experience for the whole KDE community.

  • Akademy 2017

    This year I attended my first ever conference, Akademy, the annual world summit of KDE.

Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 1 testing

Filed under
KDE

Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 1 images are now available for testing.

The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 in October. The final Beta 1 milestone will be available on August 31st.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.
  • Kube in Randa
    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains. It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).
  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.

FSF, GNU and FSFE

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Let's talk about Freedom. Embedded.
    The call for sessions is open now, until November 2nd, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. Pre-order a LibrePlanet 10th anniversary t-shirt when you register to attend! Do you want to discuss or teach others about a topic relevant to the free software community? You've got until Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 at 10:00 EDT (14:00 UTC) to submit your session proposals. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and everyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, CFP and registration open now
    The call for proposals is open now, until November 2, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and anyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • dot-zed extractor
  • FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

    To push our demand, the FSFE launched a new campaign last week: "Public Money Public Code". The campaign explains the benefits of releasing publicly funded Software under free licences with a short inspiring video and an open letter to sign. Furthermore, the campaign and the open letter will be used in the coming months until the European Parliament election in 2019 to highlight good and bad examples of publicly funded software development and its potential reuse.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe Leads Call For Taxpayer-Funded Software To Be Licensed For Free Re-use
    Considered objectively, it's hard to think of any good reasons why code that is paid for by the public should not be released publicly as a matter of course. The good news is that this "public money, public code" argument is precisely the approach that open access advocates have used with considerable success in the field of academic publishing, so there's hope it might gain some traction in the world of software too.

Security: WordPress 4.8.2, CCleaner 5.33, Apache Patch and Cryptocurrencies

  • WordPress 4.8.2 Security and Maintenance Release
    WordPress 4.8.2 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.
  • Attack on CCleaner Highlights the Importance of Securing Downloads and Maintaining User Trust
    Some of the most worrying kinds of attacks are ones that exploit users’ trust in the systems and softwares they use every day. Yesterday, Cisco’s Talos security team uncovered just that kind of attack in the computer cleanup software CCleaner. Download servers at Avast, the company that owns CCleaner, had been compromised to distribute malware inside CCleaner 5.33 updates for at least a month. Avast estimates that over 2 million users downloaded the affected update. Even worse, CCleaner’s popularity with journalists and human rights activists means that particularly vulnerable users are almost certainly among that number. Avast has advised CCleaner Windows users to update their software immediately. This is often called a “supply chain” attack, referring to all the steps software takes to get from its developers to its users. As more and more users get better at bread-and-butter personal security like enabling two-factor authentication and detecting phishing, malicious hackers are forced to stop targeting users and move “up” the supply chain to the companies and developers that make software. This means that developers need to get in the practice of “distrusting” their own infrastructure to ensure safer software releases with reproducible builds, allowing third parties to double-check whether released binary and source packages correspond. The goal should be to secure internal development and release infrastructure to that point that no hijacking, even from a malicious actor inside the company, can slip through unnoticed.
  • Apache bug leaks contents of server memory for all to see—Patch now
    There's a bug in the widely used Apache Web Server that causes servers to leak pieces of arbitrary memory in a way that could expose passwords or other secrets, a freelance journalist has disclosed. The vulnerability can be triggered by querying a server with what's known as an OPTIONS request. Like the better-known GET and POST requests, OPTIONS is a type of HTTP method that allows users to determine which HTTP requests are supported by the server. Normally, a server will respond with GET, POST, OPTIONS, and any other supported methods. Under certain conditions, however, responses from Apache Web Server include the data stored in computer memory. Patches are available here and here.
  • The Pirate Bay Takes Heat for Testing Monero Mining
    Cryptocurrencies usually are mined with CPU power initially, she told LinuxInsider. Users then find ways to speed up the hashing before going to GPU. They build specialized hardware and field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips to carry out the hashing function in order to mine much faster. [...] The notion that The Pirate Bay effectively would borrow resources from its own users is not the problem, suggested Jessica Groopman, principal analyst at Tractica.

Ubuntu and Linux Mint Development

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 19 Sep 2017
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter 519
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #519 for the weeks of September 5 – 18, 2017, and the full version is available here.
  • Ubuntu Desktop default application survey results
    Canonical has released the results of its default applications survey for the 18.04 long-term support release of Ubuntu. The results of the previous survey – for Ubuntu 17.10, dubbed Artful Aardvark – yielded great suggestions, many of which have made their way into the beta version of the operating system. For Ubuntu 18.04, over 15,000 responses were processed by the Ubuntu Desktop team. “The team is now hard at work evaluating many of the suggested applications,” said Canonical.
  • Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” Information Released
    Linux Mint Project Leader Clement Lefebvre, otherwise known as “Clem” released a blog post on Sept. 18, giving some information about the upcoming release of Linux Mint 18.3, dubbed “Sylvia.” In his blog post Lefebvre gave some ideas to some of the pieces of software and changes that will be coming, such as the inclusion of the popular system restoration tool Timeshift. For those of you who haven’t used Timeshift, it’s an application that creates snapshots of your system, and then restores them later, similar to Windows System Restore, or Mac OS’s Time Machine.