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KDE

KDE Applications 16.08 Software Suite Is in Beta, Final Release Coming August 18

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KDE

Now that the third and last maintenance update of the KDE Applications 16.04 software suite has debuted, it's time for us to take the Beta build of the next major KDE Applications release for a test drive.

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Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.7.2, Qt 5.7 and KDE Applications 16.04.3

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GNU
KDE
Linux

Chakra GNU/Linux developer Neofytos Kolokotronis today, July 25, 2016, announced the release of the latest KDE and Qt technologies, along with new software versions in the main repositories of the Linux kernel-based operating system.

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KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • Double Post – Lakademy and Randa 2016

    I Have a few favorites kde conventions that I really love to participate.

    Randa and Lakademy are always awesome, both are focused on hacking, and I surely do love to hack.

    On LaKademy I spend my days working on subsurface, reworking on the interface, trying to make it more pleasant to the eye,

    In Randa I worked on KDevelop and Marble, but oh my…

  • Plasma’s Publictransport applet’s porting status

    You might remember that I spoke about Plasma’s Publictransport applet getting some reworking during the summer. It’s been over a month since I made that announcement on my blog and while ideally, I’d have liked to have blogged every week about my work, I haven’t really been able to. This is largely down to the fact that I was occupied with work on a project back at my university and I shifted back to home from my hostel as well, after finishing four years of undergraduate studies.

  • KDE Community Working Group 2016
  • KDE Brasil Telegram group and IRC United

    That’s why the KDE Irc channel now has a bot that will forward all messages to our Telegram Channel and vice-versa, this way all the new cool kids can talk to all the old geeks around and continue to make the KDE awesome in their platform of choice.

  • Wiki, what’s going on? (Part 7)

    Tears followed by joy and happiness, discussions followed by great moments all together, problems followed by their solution and enthusiasm. Am I talking about my family? More or less, because actually I am talking about a family: the WikiToLearn community!

  • Kubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Update Out

    The first point release update to our LTS release 16.04 is out now. This contains all the bugfixes added to 16.04 since its first release in April. Users of 16.04 can run the normal update procedure to get these bugfixes.

  • Kubuntu Podcast #14 – UbPorts interview with Marius Gripsgard
  • KDStateMachineEditor 1.1.0 released

    KDStateMachineEditor is a Qt-based framework for creating Qt State Machine metacode using a graphical user interface. It works on all major platforms and is now available as part of the Qt Auto suite.

  • KDAB contributions to Qt 5.7

    The star of Qt 5.7 is the first stable release of Qt 3D 2.0. The new version of Qt 3D is a total redesign of its architecture into a modern and streamlined 3D engine, exploiting modern design patterns such as entity-component systems, and capable to scale due to the heavily threaded design. This important milestone was the result of a massive effort done by KDAB in coordination with The Qt Company.

  • Krita 3.0.1 Development Builds

    Because of unforeseen circumstances, we had to rejig our release schedule, there was no release last week. Still, we wanted to bring you a foretaste of some of the goodies that are going to be in the 3.0.1 release, which is now planned for September 5th. There’s lots to play with, here, from bug fixes (the double dot in file names is gone, the crash with cheap tablets is gone, a big issue with memory leaks in the graphics card is solved), to features (soft-proofing, among others). There may also be new bugs, and not all new features may be working correctly. Export to animated gif or video clips is still in development, and probably will not work well outside the developers’ computer.

  • KDE blowing out candles on FISL 17!

    My talk was the next. Its title was “20 anos de KDE: de Desktop a Guarda-Chuva de Projetos” (20 years of KDE: From Desktop to Project Umbrella). I presented the evolution process of our community, which led it from a desktop project to a incubator community. For those who did not attend the event the talk was recorded and it is available here. Below I also make available the slides of my presentation:

  • LabPlot 2.3.0 released

    Less then four months after the last release and after a lot of activity in our repository during this time, we’re happy to announce the next release of LabPlot with a lot of new features. So, be prepared for a long post.

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • KDE Neon OS, a review

    After hopping between Red Hat Linux, CentOS, Fedora, and Ubuntu LTS over the past decade, I recently decided to give KDE Neon a shot.

    The potential of a cutting edge desktop environment on a stable 16.04 Ubuntu base really attracted me, the first because I'm a stickler for a good GUI based UX, and the latter because most current software is built against RHEL/Ubuntu.

    However I should preface this by saying that I spend more time on Windows than the GNU/*nix based OS's combined, and so my perspective in this review may be different than how you feel.

  • System Settings help needed

    First of all I need help, but before you help me I’d like to show you what a user without development skills can do to make plasma better.

    I already post about the system settings redesign and cause developer are busy with other tasks, I reviewed the existing modules and update them to fit (more) our vision. I know it’s not how I would prefere in the end but I did the changes without development skills (no compiling, no new code). I use qt-creator for edit the ui files and play around with qml.

    The Mouse cursor theme was updated, by move the buttons to bottom as in most other kcm’s. The height of the resolution depandant button will be change soon. (left plasma 5.7 right 5.8)

  • Current status for mailrendering in kube & kmail
  • From LaTeX to ConTeXt

    Every year I start to create a new book, every year I delete the book folder because I think it’s going into the wrong direction, and ths year is no different, I’m starting to write a book about Qt5 programming with C++11, I hope this time things can go different. And what I usually do is setup my LaTeX enviroment (kile, texlive, a few libraries and all that) – but I was hitting a UTF8 issue that \includepackage[utf8 or utf8-x][inputenc] didn’t solved… And if you are not well versed in Tex debugging things can go hairwire in just no time.

KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • About my GSoC project

    My mentor gave me a task (it was one of the first ones) to refactor QMap structure, which was holding archive entries metadata, into an Archive::Entry class, which would use QProperty system. Such refactoring would bring more extensibility and allow to pass and manipulate data in more convenient ways. And of course QProperty is a big step forward for possible future using QtQuick and other nice modern Qt stuff. Today I’m finished with it. That was a huge amount of work in order to complete that task. It was not hard itself, but rather routine, because this structure was used by large part of code. Though after that I faced a tough challenge to fix all the bugs I’ve done with that refactoring. Now I’m happy I can proceed to other important things.

  • Accelerating Vector Tile Creation

    Late summer brings a couple of interesting dates for the Marble community: On the Desktop we’ll release Marble 2.0 and around the same time our Android app Marble Maps will have its first stable release. Later on in September it’s time to celebrate the 10th birthday of the Marble project!

    The common theme to the upcoming release is the introduction of the Vector OSM map: A beautifully styled map based on data from the OpenStreetMap project that spans the entire world from globe to street zoom level. In order to make this possible we’re working very hard behind the scenes to optimize both the tile data and the rendering in Marble to give you a smooth experience.

  • 17th FISL, KDE Brazil and cake!

    In this last week happened in a cold city called Porto Alegre, in Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil, the 17 edition of FISL, the Free Software International Forum.

    Well… KDE has always participated in this forum, and the organization gave to us all day in a room, so the KDE Community could make a lot of talks.

KDE Notes and Blurbs

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KDE

KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • Too much of a good thing

    Then, since April, Krita-wise, there was the Kickstarter, the kick-off for the artbook, the Krita 3.0 release... The 3.0 release doubled the flow of bugs, donations, comments, mails to the foundation, questions on irc, reddit, forum and everywhere else. (There's this guy who has sent me over fifty mails asking for Krita to be released for Windows XP, OSX 10.5 and Ubuntu 12.02, for example). And Google Summer of Code kicked off, with three students working on Krita.

  • No 3.0.1 Release This Week

    The Krita release process still depends completely on one person making the Windows, Linux and OSX builds — me, Boudewijn. And I’ve been out of action for a week and a half now, so I couldn’t make those builds. Since I need some more time to recover and pick up all the threads and todo’s, we decided to move to a new release schedule, skipping the planned 3.0.1 release.

  • Why does kwin_wayland not start?
  • LabPlot: Theme Manager – Themes Context Menu & a new Theme “Dark”
  • Animating auto-hiding panels
  • Just So Many Things To Write
  • widget optimization in plasma 5.7

    Check all default widgets about there layout and sizing. So start playing with widgets and say us what we did right and what we should fix.

Get the Look of KDE Plasma 5 on Your GNOME Desktop

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KDE
GNOME
HowTos

The airy aesthetics have won Plasma 5 an army of admirers, and helped to cement the new visual impression of the KDE desktop experience redux.

But what if you’re not using KDE? Well, you don’t have to miss out.

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KDE Applications 16.04.3 Is the Last in the Series, Out Now for KDE Plasma 5.7.1

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KDE
Software

After announcing the availability of the first maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment, KDE also released today the third and last point release for the KDE Applications 16.04 software suite.

KDE Applications 16.04.3 is here to fix twenty more bugs reported by users since last month's KDE Applications 16.04.2 point release, bringing improvements to various KDE applications that are usually shipped by default with any new installation of the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

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KDE Plasma 5.7.1 Improves Microphone Volume Actions, Adds Plasma Workspace Fixes

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KDE

Today, July 12, 2016, the KDE project has announced the general availability of the first point release for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment, bringing multiple fixes and improvements.

The KDE Plasma 5.7 release is the most advanced version of the acclaimed desktop environment used by many GNU/Linux operating systems by default for their users, but this doesn't mean that it's perfect, and bug reports are submitted every single day.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.