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KDE: GSoC Projects and Belated Akademy 2017 Coverage

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KDE
  • GSoC - Third month analysis

    My aim was to work on note names and piano composition and those are the most basic activies kids need to learn. A child should learn note names first to have a good understanding of note position and naming convention. Then the activity piano composition should be played to have the knowledge of musical notation and musical staff, then comes the play piano activity which explains how the piano keyboard can play music as written on musical staff and then the rhythms are learnt on the basis of what they see and hear in play rhythm. In the last two weeks I worked on completing Note names which you can test in my branch note names.

  • GSoC Final report - Part 1: Okular

    This is the first post of a 3-part series where I will go into technical details of my summer of code project. I will give a high-level overview about the current state of my written code, show you what’s supposed to work and how you can try that; and what still needs to be done.

    Then I will write about some “Gotcha!” moments I have experienced in the past few months and what I could learn from them. Those aren’t in any way ordered and are there to explain why my project turned out like it did - and hopefully even help some future GSoC students along the way.

  • GSoC Final report - Part 2: Gwenview

    A first revision of my patch is up on phabricator, which works for raster graphics. Your holiday pictures should now open in all their details and no longer be a blurry mess!

  • GSoC Final report - Part 3: Summary

    I can’t believe the three months are already over, the time flies when you’re having fun.

    Unfortunately, I couldn’t tackle everything I had planned - the rendering in Okular and Gwenview was much complexer than I anticipated. Once again, it needs much more time to modify existing code than to write new one.

    Nevertheless, I enjoyed this challenge and hope the code for Okular will be merged in the next days and can therefore be in the next release - making HiDPI a more pleasant experience for the whole KDE community.

  • Akademy 2017

    This year I attended my first ever conference, Akademy, the annual world summit of KDE.

Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 1 testing

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KDE

Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 1 images are now available for testing.

The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 in October. The final Beta 1 milestone will be available on August 31st.

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Last week in Kube and End of KDE GSoC Projects

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KDE
  • Last week in Kube

    “Kube is a modern communication and collaboration client built with QtQuick on top of a high performance, low resource usage core. It provides online and offline access to all your mail, contacts, calendars, notes, todo’s and more. With a strong focus on usability, the team works with designers and UX experts from the ground up, to build a product that is not only visually appealing but also a joy to use.”

  • Summing up my GSoC experience

    The best thing about this experience is that I learnt a lot of new and exciting stuff: new technologies, pattern and development methodologies. Not only I improved my skills with modern web development tools but I also got quite proficient with the Vue.js and Webpack ecosystems. At the same time I got a bit better at writing and structuring documentation, something that many developers forget about.

  • Finalizing the GSoC project for KStars

    I worked on the KStars during this summer to improve the codebase with C++11 features with Google Summer of Code. I spent the last month to write the first GUI tests for KStars and KStars Lite. KStars Lite can be built and run also on Linux host now although it was developed for Android by a previous GSoC student in 2016. Additional contributions include fixing some bugs found by Clang Sanitizers, usability improvements and templeted FITS decoding. The GSoC period was successful, the goals were reached, but if I would have still more time...

  • My experiences with Summer of Code 2017

    How quickly the summer ran away, in a wild mix of fun, frustration, development, and success! It seems like just yesterday that I received news of working with Marble in the summer, yet now September quickly approaches, and it’s time to look back on all our experiences this summer.

  • Final Blog Gsoc 2017

    Over the past three months, I’ve been working on a telemetry project for the graphic editor Krita. I achieved almost all the goals. A working prototype was created, you can help in its testing by downloading a test version of the Krita with telemetry support. link

  • GSoC - Final Period

    I implemented some scripts to the showcase and some new plugins as well. You can find my task here and see more details about my progress during GSoC.

KDevelop 5.1.2 released

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Development
KDE

We are pleased to announce the release of KDevelop version 5.1.2, the second bug-fix release for the 5.1 series. This update contains bug fixes only, and we highly recommend all users of KDevelop 5.1.x to switch to this version. Given that it has been a few months since the release of KDevelop 5.1.1, this version contains quite a lot of changes.

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QtQuick and QProcess

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KDE
  • Warning: NVIDIA driver 384.69 seems to be broken with QtQuick

    Just a short warning to KDE Plasma users with NVIDIA drivers. Lately we have seen many crash reports from NVIDIA users who updated to version 384.xx. Affected is at least KWin and KScreenLocker, which means one cannot unlock the session any more. The crash happens in the NVIDIA driver triggered from somewhere in QtQuick, so completely outside of our code.

  • GSoC- Port of Lua to QProcess

    Hi, it has been a bit long since I last wrote a blog about the status of my GSoC project. This has been majorly because I got a job and it has kept me busy ever since. Anyway, I managed to complete my second month target , mostly by working on weekends. Here’s a quick update on what I did during the 2nd month

  • GSoC – Port of R to QProcess

    During the first two months I had ported 2 back ends to QProcess, which includes Lua and Qalculate. For the last month I was left with 2 more backends , which were  R and Python .  Due to time constraint I decided that I will be working on just one of the two. Python’s code base was a bit large because of the two versions of Python(2.7 and 3), hence I decided to work on R.

KDE: Google Summer of Code, Falkon, and Sticklyst

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KDE
  • KDE Had Another Successful Year With Google Summer of Code

    KDE saw more than one dozen student developers interact on various projects this summer thanks to the Google Summer of Code 2017.

    The KDE projects for GSoC 20917 ranged from digiKam improvements to developing a new chat bridge, Go language support in KDevelop, HiDPI improvements, and more.

  • QupZilla Web Browser Has Revealed Its New Name

    ‘Falkon’ is the new name of cross-platform Qt web-browser QupZilla.

    The developer behind the Qupzilla browser announced the intention to rename the project in early august, and invited users of the browser to submit their own name suggestions.

  • Sticklyst Shows How KDE Frameworks Can Be Used On The Web

    Qt/KDE developer Daniel Nicoletti has written "Sticklyst" to show how KDE Frameworks 5 code can be used to construct web sites/applications.

KDE: Krita, Koko, Kate/KDevelop, GCompris, KStars, Qt and Sticklyst

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KDE
  • Krita 3.2.0 Best Alternative To Photoshop for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Krita is a KDE program for sketching and painting, although it has image processing capabilities, offering an end–to–end solution for creating digital painting files from scratch by masters. Fields of painting that Krita explicitly supports are concept art, creation of comics and textures for rendering. Modelled on existing real-world painting materials and workflows, Krita supports creative working by getting out of the way and with a snappy response.

  • Gsoc Final Week Report

    Koko is a simple image gallery application that is designed to view, edit and share the images.

  • Look what you have done^W^Wdo!

    You are using Kate or KDevelop and often editing directly the sources of Markdown files, Qt UI files, SVG files, Dot graph files and whatever else formats which are based on plain text files?

    And you are having to use a workflow to check the current state which is saving the file and (re)loading it in a separate viewer application?

  • GCompris- Digital Electricity Tutorial levels
  • Hundreds of visual surveys in KStars!

    With the KStars "Hipster" 2.8.1 release, I introduced Hierarchical Progressive Survey (HiPS) in KStars with three sample catalogs in the optical, infrared, and gamma regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  • A new QProcess::startDetached
  • Announcing Sticklyst – leveraging KDE Frameworks on the Web

    Sticklyst is a web paste tool, like pastebin, Stick Notes (paste.kde.org), build with Cutelyst and KDE Frameworks.

    Building this kind of tool has been on my TODO list for a long time, but never really put some effort into it. When the idea first came by, I decided to look at the code of http://paste.scsys.co.uk/ which is powered by a Perl Catalyst application, to my surprise the Perl module that handled syntax highlighting was a port of the code of Kate, and it even said it used Kate’s definitions.

Krita 3.2.1, Updates Vision and More

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KDE
Software

KDE and the Menu Crisis

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KDE

The menu crisis has been slow in coming — so slowly that few people are aware of it. Bit by bit, they have become accustomed to the inconvenience and distraction of the menu on the computer desktop, and learned to endure it. Yet the fact that KDE’s Plasma 5 desktop offers three choices of menu layouts, as well as a couple of alternatives to alleviate the difficulties shows just how little consensus exists about the most usable menu design.

The crisis exists because the menu was designed when thirty megabyte hard drives were the norm, yet we continue to use it. The purpose of a menu is to launch an application, preferably as quickly as possible, so a user’s work flow is uninterrupted. When personal computers were first introduced, menus easily filled this purpose. Few applications were available, and menus rarely had to be more than a couple of levels deep, so applications could easily be found.

However, as hard drives became larger, users had to scan more and more applications to find the one they wanted. The most extreme case was the Debian menu, which in places was six or seven levels deep. All sorts of partial solutions were tried –for example, not listing all the applications, a search field, and favorite list — but the problem has steadily increased with the size of drives. Probably the only reason why all the stopgap designs and solutions for menus are tolerated at all is that their uses on phones and tablets means that they have conditioned all of us to endure the awkwardness as the norm. Most users simply assume that nothing can be done, and continue using menus the same as always — ironically, often at the same time as moving away from desktop launchers, which can have the same problems, but can at least take provide another solution to help keep menus functioning.

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QupZilla Renamed KDE Falkon, Developer David Rosca interviewed

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KDE
Interviews
Web
  • QupZilla Web Browser Becomes KDE Falkon

    The QupZilla open-source web-browser built using Qt WebEngine and in development for the past seven years is now part of the KDE project and has renamed itself to Falkon.

    Earlier this month the QupZilla developers announced they would be moving under the KDE umbrella and in the process rename itself. Today they made it known their new name for this KDE web-browser is Falkon.

  • The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews David Rosca of QupZilla

    QupZilla, currently at version 2.1.2, is a free software Web browser using the new and very fast QtWebEngine browser. It aims to be a lightweight Web browser available through all major platforms. This project was originally started only for educational purposes by a lone developer, David Rosca, and since then, QupZilla has grown into a feature-rich browser. QupZilla has all of the standard functions you expect from a Web browser. It includes bookmarks, history (including a sidebar view), and tabs. Above that, it has ad-blocking enabled by default with a built-in plugin. Over time, this one-man project has grown to include numerous contributors.

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FSFE: ‘German public sector a digital laggard’

With their lacklustre approach to free software, German public services remain behind other European member states, says the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE). When asked, the current governing parties’ say they support free software, but their statements are contradicted by the lack of action, the advocacy group says. In early September, the FSFE published its analysis of the free software policies put forward by the main political parties on the ballot, in preparation for Germany’s parliamentary elections on 24 September. This analysis (in German) is far more detailed than an earlier report generated by the Digital-O-Mat, a web portal set up to focus on political parties’ positions on 12 digital topics. Read more New release: ISA² interoperability test bed software v1.1.0