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KDE

KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • The Novelty of KDE Neon

    The good folks at KDE managed to engage a market of Linux desktop users underserved by other distribution models. Or, maybe it’s just me.

    KDE has a long history in the desktop ecosystem. It was the first Linux desktop I was exposed to back in 2006. Back then, it was on OpenSUSE and it was clean and functional. For some reason after that, installing KDE had never really appealed to me. I’ve tested it out briefly when poking around at what the OpenSUSE guys were doing and I’ve run Kubuntu for brief snippets. For years, I’ve been trying to find out what type of desktop user I am and which distro fits my needs.

  • Tracking KDE Frameworks and Qt

    The KDE-FreeBSD team bumped Qt to 5.7.1 and KDE Frameworks to 5.31.0 in official ports last week, so we’re fairly up-to-date in that department. On FreeBSD, we still fully support Qt4 next to Qt5, so some of the delay in getting this stuff in is due to some shuffling of install locations. In particular, we’ve added qt-chooser in this round of updates, so that qmake is qmake — and no longer qmake-qt4 or some other suffixed binary. We use qt-chooser to switch out one or the other. Checking that this doesn’t break anything else — or at least making sure that everything still compiles — is what took the most time this round of updates.

  • Simple Menu Launcher for KDE Plasma 5.9

    Following "United" theme, there is also "Simple Menu" launcher for KDE Plasma 5.9. It's minimal, a smaller form of full screen menu; it's also clean, showing all applications at once. Honestly, it's UI is similar to Pantheon Menu in elementary OS but including categories. If you like horizontal-oriented menu, Simple Menu is suitable for you. It's available to install from KDE Store. Thanks to Sho for creating Simple Menu.

  • A Simple KDE Twitter Plasmoid

    This KDE Twitter Plasmoids offers a simpler alternative to a desktop Linux twitter app like Choqok. See tweets, send tweets, and check mentions.

  • Telegram desktop client for flatpak #2

    Some time ago I posted a blog post about how I packed telegram desktop client for flatpak. I’ve been updating it since then in some reasonable intervals as I don’t have time to update it more often and mostly because the telegram client’s build system breaks my build quite oftenly. Recently I discovered that someone managed to patch telegram to use system Qt libraries instead of building own patched Qt and building linking it statically. After some time I managed to adjust those patches and make them work with my build which allows me to use Qt from KDE runtimes. Here are new instructions how to get this work:

  • Building the latest greatest for Android AArch64 (with Vulkan teaser)

    Let’s say you got a 64-bit ARM device running Android. For instance, the Tegra X1-based NVIDIA Shield TV. Now, let’s say you are also interested in the latest greatest content from the dev branch, for example to try out some upcoming Vulkan enablers from here and here, and want to see all this running on the big screen with Android TV. How do we get Qt, or at least the basic modules like QtGui, QtQuick, etc. up and running on there?

  • Qt Quick WebGL Streaming

    WebGL Streaming is optimized for Qt Quick and allows you to run remote Qt Quick applications in a browser.

Recreating the PCLinuxOS Full Monty with KDE Plasma Activities

Filed under
KDE
PCLOS

When I recently wrote about the new PCLinuxOS release, I was a bit disappointed to find that the Full Monty version had been laid to rest. I'm sure there were a lot of good reasons for this decision, and I have no quarrel with it. But it still made me a bit sad, because I have always kept the Full Monty on at least one of my systems (it is currently on my Acer All-In-One desktop), and I often showed it to people who were curious about Linux, as an example of its breadth, depth and flexibility.

So I decided that it might be a useful exercise for me to try to create the equivalent of the Full Monty desktop starting from the latest PCLinuxOS KDE5 distribution. There are two major features which distinguish the Full Monty desktop - it had six virtual desktops, each of which was dedicated to a specific use, and it had lots and lots and lots of packages installed. The desktops looked like this:

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Qt 5.9 Alpha Released

Filed under
KDE

I am happy to inform you that Qt 5.9 Alpha has been released today.

Qt 5.9 Alpha is an important milestone on our way to the final Qt 5.9.0 release, which is targeted to be released by the end of May 2017.

The Alpha release is available only as source packages. Binary installers will be available via the online installer in conjunction with the Beta release as well as development snapshots during the coming weeks.

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Development News

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • Best practices for guiding new coders

    As the new year progresses, many free and open source projects are turning their attention to various formalized mentoring programs, such as Mozilla's Winter of Security, Outreachy, and (the program with my favorite name) the X.Org Endless Vacation of Code. Patterned after the success of Google's Summer of Code, these programs give many new programmers a chance to gain firsthand experience working within successful FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software) projects and the projects themselves access to fresh talent.

  • Developing an nrf51822 based embedded device with Qt Creator and Debian

    I'm currently developing an nRF51822-based embedded device. Being one the Qt/Qt Creator maintainers in Debian I would of course try to use it for the development. Turns out it works pretty good... with some caveats.

  • How to create a look and feel theme
  • Qt Roadmap for 2017

    With Qt 5.7 and 5.8 released we have a completely new baseline for Qt 5 based applications and devices. In this blog, I want to provide a roadmap update on what we are currently working on in the Qt R&D and what the future directions are.

  • Qt's Roadmap For 2017: Graphics, An Exciting Qt 5.9/5.10

    Tuukka Turunen of The Qt Company has shared some of the project's goals for the 2017 calendar year in delivering Qt 5.9 and Qt 5.10 along with more point releases.

    Qt developers hope to make 2017 exciting by shipping Qt 5.9 in May and their hope is to ship Qt 5.10 this November.

  • Intend to retire perl-Log-Any-Adapter-Dispatch

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Fedora 25 KDE: disappointing experience

    Fedora is not a frequent guest on the review deck of Linux notes from DarkDuck blog. The most recent review was of Fedora 22 back in July 2015. That was a review of the GNOME version, the most native for Fedora.

    You are probably aware of the tight link between the GNOME project and RedHat, the Fedora Project main sponsor.

  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 Unity 8 - KDE apps native on Mir
  • Plasma in a Snap?

    Shortly before FOSDEM, Aleix Pol asked if I had ever put Plasma in a Snap. While I was a bit perplexed by the notion itself, I also found this a rather interesting idea.

    So, the past couple of weeks I spent a bit of time here and there on trying to see if it is possible.

  • QStringView Diaries: Advances in QStringLiteral

    This is the first in a series of blog posts on QStringView, the std::u16string_view equivalent for Qt. You can read about QStringView in my original post to the Qt development mailing-list, follow its status by tracking the “qstringview” topic on Gerrit and learn about string views in general in Marshall Clow’s CppCon 2015 talk, aptly named “string_view”.

  • Making Movies with QML

    One of the interesting things about working with Qt is seeing all the unexpected ways our users use the APIs we create. Last year I got a bug report requesting an API to set a custom frame rate for QML animations when using QQuickRenderControl. The reason was that the user was using QQuickRenderControl as an engine to render video output from Qt Quick, and if your target was say 24 frames per second, the animations were not smooth because of how the default animation driver behaves. So inspired by this use case I decided to take a stab at creating such an example myself.

  • How to Create a Look and Feel Theme
  • United Desktop Theme for KDE Plasma 5.9
  • KDE Talks at FOSDEM

    The continuation of the original talk from Dirk Hohndel and Linus Torvalds about the port of Subsurface from Gtk to Qt, now with mobile in mind.

KDE Plasma 5.8.6 Released for LTS Users with over 80 Improvements, Bug Fixes

Filed under
KDE
Security

Today, February 21, 2017, KDE announced the availability of the sixth maintenance update to the long-term supported KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

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Plasma 5.9.2, Applications 16.12.2 and Frameworks 5.31.0 available in Chakra

Filed under
KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users.

Included with this update, is an update of the ncurses, readline and gnutls related group of packages, as well as many other important updates in our core repository. Be aware that during this update, your screen might turn black. If that is the case and it does not automatically restore after some time, then please switch to tty3 with Ctrl+Alt+F3 and then switch back to the Plasma session with Ctrl+Alt+F7. If that does not work, please give enough time for the upgrade to complete before shutting down. You can check your cpu usage using 'top' after logging in within tty3. You can reboot within tty3 using 'shutdown --reboot'.

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Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools.

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The State of Plasma

Filed under
KDE

Over the years, my experience with KDE can best be described as a rollercoaster – on ice, with rocket thrusters. KDE3.5 was a great release, followed by a somewhat mellow, emotionally curbed KDE4, which took years blossoming, and then when it finally gained solid form, it was replaced with KDE5, or rather, Plasma 5.

Since 2014, Plasma has kept me entertained and disappointed in equal measures. At some point, I had it crowned my favorite desktop, and then it went downhill steeply, fast, struggling to recover. Not helping was the slew of bugs and regressions across the distro space, which exacerbated the quality of Plasma and what it could show the world. Today, I would like to explore Plasma from a different angle. Not from the user perspective, but usability perspective. AKA Everything What Plasma Does. After me.

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KDE in Slackware, Cutelyst 1.4.0 Ready

Filed under
KDE
Slack
  • KDE 5_17.02 for Slackware-current is available

    I am happy to announce my February 2017 release of the ‘ktown’ packages: KDE 5_17.02. What you get in this new release is: KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, Plasma 5.9.2 and Applications 16.12.2. All built on top of Qt 5.7.1.
    Soon, I will compile this version of Plasma 5 on Slackware 14.2 (only 64bit) as well, but I gave priority last few days to the new LibreOffice packages and a new PLASMA5 Live image. The packages that I am releasing today are for Slackware-current only (both 32bit and 64bit). As stated in my previous post, I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • New Slackware PLASMA5 Live ISO (with Plasma 5.9)

    To conclude this week’s batch of updates in my repositories I have re-generated the ISO for PLASMA5 Slackware Live Edition – it is based on liveslak 1.1.6.2 and using Slackware-current dated “Mon Feb 13 06:21:22 UTC 2017“.

    If you already use PLASMA5 Live on a USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • Cutelyst 1.4.0 released, C100K ready.

    Thanks to the last batch of improvements and with the great help of jemalloc, cutelyst-wsgi can do 100k request per second using a single thread/process on my i5 CPU. Without the use of jemalloc the rate was around 85k req/s.

    This together with the EPoll event loop can really scale your web application, initially I thought that the option to replace the default glib (on Unix) event loop of Qt had no gain, but after increasing the connection number it handle them a lot better. With 256 connections the request per second using glib event loop get’s to 65k req/s while the EPoll one stays at 90k req/s a lot closer to the number when only 32 connections is tested.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu and elementary

  • System76 wants to build its own hardware for its Linux-based computers
    System76 is building up quite a name for itself, being one of a very limited number of companies selling only computers running Linux-based operating systems. Now the aim is to branch out; System76 wants to design and build its own hardware, while representing the open source community as it does so. At the moment, the hardware used in System76 systems is outsourced, but in the future this will change. The company says that it is moving into phase three of its development cycle, and this "moves product design and manufacturing in house." And you should set your expectations high: "We're about to build the Model S of computers. Something so brilliant and beautiful that reviewers will have to add an 11 to their scores."
  • AppCenter Spotlight: Beta Testers
    Over the past month we’ve been beta testing the new AppCenter with a number of developers, from elementary OS contributors to backers of our Indiegogo campaign. After testing out the submission process and getting some apps into the store (and seeing rapid updates!), I wanted to take a moment to highlight some of the first apps.
  • elementary OS to get improved AppCenter, showing off a few new applications
    I have to hand it to the elementary OS guys, they have a massive focus on design and it does look quite incredible. It is easily one of the best looking Linux distributions, which I do admire. Their new AppCenter, for example, looks extremely clean and clear.

Beijing Zoo is No Place for Pandas

Pandas in Beijing Zoo
Photo credit: Nick Hopkins

I am a Panda lover. I work as a support engineer in an I.T company here in the United Kingdom. Most of my spare time is spent watching different Panda videos -- both old and new videos. Basically, it is my therapy; a 'stress release' for me. I find them to be adorable and precious creatures. As a matter of fact, I would like to volunteer to come to Sichuan. I want to experience and feel what it's like to be a Panda keeper, to be able to interact with them for real. The Panda is China's National Treasure, so it's a shame to watch the Panda videos from Beijing zoo, as the place is disgusting and not ideal for Pandas to live in (and for sure for all the rest of the animals who unfortunately got stuck in this prison cell).

The place looks like a ghost town. Lifeless and languished. Knowing that Pandas wear a thick fur on their body, can you imagine what it feels for them in 30C or 35C (summer temperature)? What it probably feels like all the time? Come on, if you really care, you must do something now, otherwise these Pandas will die. Please bring them back to their sanctuary where they really belong.

Linux 4.11 File-System Tests: EXT4, F2FS, XFS & Btrfs

With the Linux 4.11 kernel potentially being released as soon as today, here are some fresh benchmarks of Btrfs / EXT4 / F2FS / XFS on a solid-state drive and comparing the performance of 4.11 Git back to Linux 4.9 and 4.10. For those wondering if the block/file-system changes of Linux 4.11 have any impact on EXT4/F2FS/XFS/Btrfs for common I/O workloads or how these file-systems are comparing on this latest kernel, here are some benchmarks. Read more

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