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KDE

KDE: Krita, KDE Partition Manager 3.2.0, KMarkdownWebView 0.2.0

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KDE
  • Interview with Emily Wei

    This might have changed in version 3, but I’m still using version two-point-something since my computer can’t quite handle the newest version.

  • KDE Partition Manager 3.2.0

    I have just released versions 3.2.0 of KDE Partition Manager and KPMcore library. Note that if you use Calamares installer you need version 3.1.4 or later, earlier versions of Calamares will not compile against new kpmcore.

  • KMarkdownWebView 0.2.0

    The KMarkdownWebView software is for the rendered display of Markdown documents, using web technologies (native wrapper around a webpage with a JavaScript library which creates HTML from the plain text handed in).

KDE Neon Complete Distro Review

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KDE
Reviews

It's no secret to anyone: KDE and its latest implementation, Plasma 5, have been my favorite applications and desktop suite for quite some time now. I started GNU / Linux with Gnome 2 that brought Ubuntu Feisty Fawn but quickly jumped to that unknown ocean, full of strange words with the letter K in them, called Kubuntu.
Coming and going, distros and more distros, until you end up trapped by the Chakra magic and its unique environment. As much as I have tried to change this fact in successive attacks of distro hopping. I have not been able to accommodate myself to anyone other than Cinnamon, although I have missed a few features almost exclusive to Plasma. It also happens in reverse, that is, I think that KDE suffers from some things, but in the balance weighs more, by far, the positive than the negative.

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KDE/Qt: Qt Desktops, KDE e.V. Board Dinner, KWin/Wayland, Privacy, KTimer, Plasma 5.11 Beta

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KDE
  • It’s the Qt showdown

    Qt desktops are many and varied. So one may ask, all right, if you have to choose one, which one? Well, the answer is both complicated and philosophical. First, because taste is subjective, and my immediate answer would be Plasma, hands down. The way it is realized in Kubuntu 17.04 is just awesome. The best Linux has to offer on the market right now.

    But let’s say you want to choose from one of the other available Qt-based desktops. What do you do then? Well, that’s why we’re here, and I’d like to give you a multi-dimensional overview and comparison of these different Qt desktop environments. After all, we talked about them a fair bit recently, so let’s narrow it down, shall we?

  • Come dine with the KDE e.V. board in Berlin in October!

    As has become tradition in recent years, the KDE e.V. board will have an open dinner alongside its in-person meeting in Berlin, Germany on October 14th, at 7 PM.

  • KDE's KWin Running On Wayland Gets Real-Time Scheduling

    When KDE's KWin is acting as a Wayland compositor, there's now a real-time scheduling policy to ensure the graphical system is always responsive.

  • KWin/Wayland goes real time

    Today I landed a change in KWin master branch to enable real time scheduling policy for KWin/Wayland. The idea behind this change is to keep the graphical system responsive at all times, no matter what other processes are doing.

    So far KWin was in the same scheduling group as most other processes. While Linux’s scheduler is completely fair and should provide a fair amount of time to KWin, it could render the system hard to use. All processes are equal, but some processes are more equal than others. KWin – as the windowing system – is to a certain degree more equal. All input and all rendering events need to go through KWin.

    We can now imagine situations where a system can become unusable due to KWin not getting sufficient time slots. E.g. if the user moves the mouse we expect a timely cursor motion. But if KWin is not scheduled the system is quickly starting to lagging. Basically what we expect is that when the mouse moves with the next page flip the cursor must be at the updated position. A page flip happens normally every 16 msec (60 Hz), so if we miss one or two we are in the area where a user visually notices this. For a gamer with a high precision mouse this could be quite problematic already.

  • Privacy Software

    As a means to give our work direction and a clearer purpose, KDE is currently in the process of soul-searching. Here’s my proposal of what we should concentrate and focus on in the coming years. I’d welcome any feedback from the community to make this proposal better, and rally up more support from the community, and others interested.

  • Kirigamization of old KDE applications

    There are quite a few applications in KDE that are severely outdated and deserve a new life.

  • Get Plasma 5.11 Beta on Kubuntu from PPA

Qt/KDE: Qt World Summit, GammaRay, Kdenlive, and Krita

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KDE
  • Lots of lights: Generating cities

    Sometimes data visualization might call for more than a graph - you need to visualize complex data, such as that generated by city lighting, in three dimensions to get the full effect.

    KDAB decided to put together a showcase for the Qt World Summit that allowed us to demonstrate Qt 3D's capabilities as a performant next-generation graphics engine, which can draw thousands of lights and objects simultaneously. This also enabled us to show what modern technologies like Qt 3D can achieve when paired with OpenGL, C++ and custom tooling.

  • GammaRay 2.8.1 Release

    We have released version 2.8.1 of our Qt application introspection tool GammaRay. This release contains a number of important bugfixes as well as support for Qt 5.9.2. Especially if you are experiencing corrupt views or crashes when searching in the object tree, or having trouble attaching to a process on Windows, you want to upgrade to the new version. The same applies to users of bleeding edge Qt versions experiencing build failures.

  • Last week in Kdenlive

    This release is only made available for interested testers and should not be used for production. Please report problems in the categories placed on the phabricator page regarding the AppImage / timeline refactoring branch, we will switch back to the normal bugtracker when the beta release will be ready.

  • Krita 3.3 Open-Source Digital Painting App Released with Better HiDPI Support

    Krita, the cross-platform, open-source and free digital painting tool used by hundreds of thousands of artists worldwide, has been updated today to version 3.3, a point release that adds better HiDPI support and many other improvements.

    Prominent changes of Krita 3.3 include support for the Windows 8 event API to bring native support for the n-trig pen in the Surface line of laptops, as well as other similar notebooks from Acer, Dell or HP, refactored hardware-accelerated display functionality to make Krita use Direct3D indirectly instead of native OpenGL.

KDE: Nextcloud, Elisa, and Plasma

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KDE
  • Nextcloud gets End to End Encryption

    Today is a special day for Nextcloud and me because Nextcloud gets a cool and important new capability. This is end to end encryption for file sync and share. Nextcloud supports server side encryption for a long time and all file transfer over the internet is encrypted with

  • Last Week Development in Elisa

    I have focused on keyboard navigation and correct handling of focus. Some preliminary work is already integrated with more to come. I hope to soon be able to use Elisa only with the keyboard and am starting to enjoy the progress so far. This is quite different from the last two years where only mouse and touch screen were usable to interact with Elisa.

  • Plasma secrets: task manager tweaks

    Recently, I have been having a lot of fun with the Plasma desktop. It all started with Zesty Zapus, a phenomenal release that redeemed KDE. In fact, I've boldly proclaimed that my next serious box to use Linux will be running Kubuntu, most likely the upcoming 2018 LTS. It hasn't been this merry since roughly 2006 or so. Happy days.

    With so much time and pleasure spent on Kubuntu, I've dubbed the perfect distro, and then, I've also shown you how to deftly pimp it into sweet submission, as well as graced you with a few more tips and tricks that should make your Plasma experience sweeter still. Now, we will discuss another less known feature in this desktop environment, and that's the task manager. Shall we. 

    [...]

    Plasma desktop is way ahead of anything else in the Linux world right now. Yes, there are still glaring issues and annoying bugs, like the file copy timestamp for Samba shares or the ability to play media from remote devices, but overall, it's shaping up to be an excellent product. There's a lot of thought and attention to detail, and layer upon layer of smart, intelligent functionality packaged in an elegant and presentable way. I'm really really liking this.

    Well, hopefully, today's little guide gives you even more reasons to try Plasma. It started with a revelation that is Kubuntu 17.04, then I've shown you how to pimp this desktop for everyday use, and given you a wealth of tricks that should make the experience even more enjoyable. Finally, we have these task manager tweaks. Well, if you have a request for anything else, don't be a stranger. Shout, happy KDE, and may Plasma be with you.

Krita 3.3.0

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KDE

Less than a month after Krita 3.2.1, we’re releasing Krita 3.3.0. We’re bumping the version because there are some important changes, especially for Windows users in this version!

Read more

Also: KGraphViewer 2.4.2

Neon: the naked KDE

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KDE
Reviews

I had nothing to complain about the technical part of KDE Neon Live run. It was smooth and fast. There were no glitches or unexpected delays (apart from one - I cannot remember the exact details).

However, the lack of the very basic software makes me stop from recommending this distribution to the beginners. It may be a good distribution for those users who know their way in the Linux world well, who are confident in what they need and how to get it themselves.

Do you recognise yourself in the first or the second category of Linux users?

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KDE: GCompris 0.81, Plasma Mobile and Convergence, KDE Plasma 5 and FreeBSD

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KDE
  • Release GCompris 0.81

    We are happy to bring you GCompris 0.81.

    This is a bugfix release to correct some issues in previous version. All GNU/Linux distributions shipping 0.80 should update to 0.81.

    Also, we introduce a new “light” version that doesn’t require OpenGL to run. This means that it should work on any computer. We provide some special windows packages using this option, and also the standalone installer for Linux 32bit is using this option. In this light version, the transparency gradient on the menu is gone, and we had to adapt a dozen of activities that will look a little different in this mode, but should still be usable.

  • Plasma Mobile and Convergence

    Convergence, in the broadest sense, has been one of the design goals of Plasma when we started creating it. When we work on Plasma, we ultimately expect components to run on a wide variety of target devices, we refer to that concept as the device spectrum.

  • Switched to Plasma 5

    I’ve switched to using Plasma 5 as my daily (work) desktop. “So what?” you say, since Plasma 5 has been available since July 15th, 2014. Yep, more than three years on the desktop — see Sebas’s blog for some history. So I’ve finally switched my FreeBSD desktop machine, as a sign that Plasma 5 really is coming closer to the official FreeBSD ports tree.

  • KDE Plasma 5 Is Almost Ready For FreeBSD Ports

    More than three years after the initial release of KDE Plasma 5 for Linux, the support on FreeBSD is getting into shape.

    KDE contributor Adriaan de Groot who has been leading the charge for getting the KDE packages working well on FreeBSD has mentioned he's now finally switched his FreeBSD desktop machine to Plasma 5.

Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) and Ubuntu

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KDE
Ubuntu
  • Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 2 testing

    Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 2 images are now available for testing.

    The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 in October. The final Beta 2 milestone will be available on September 28.

    This is the first spin in preparation for the Beta 2 pre-release. Kubuntu Beta pre-releases are NOT recommended for:

  • Ubuntu Dock Now Supports Progress Bars and Badge Counts

    Support for the Unity Launcher API has managed to squeak in to the Ubuntu Dock package on Ubuntu 17.10 before the user-interface freezes takes place.

  • LXD Weekly Status #16

    The main highlight of this week was the release of LXD 2.18.

    We’ve otherwise been busy tracking down and fixing a number of issues, extended the user-agent string that LXD uses when talking to our image server and been working on a number of fixes for LXC 2.1.

    We’re also making good progress on the stable release branches and hope to get to tag a number of stable bugfix releases next week.

  •  

KTextEditorPreviewPlugin Reaches 0.1.0 and a Quick Look (Screenshots) at KDE Plasma 5.11

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KDE
  • KTextEditorPreviewPlugin 0.1.0

    The KTextEditorPreviewPlugin software provides the KTextEditor Document Preview Plugin, a plugin for the editor Kate, the IDE KDevelop, or other software using the KTextEditor framework.

    The plugin enables a live preview of the currently edited text document in the final format. For the display it uses the KParts plugin which is currently selected as the preferred one for the MIME type of the document. If there is no matching KParts plugin, no preview is possible.

  • Quick Look at KDE Plasma 5.11

    KDE released Plasma 5.11 beta version at 14 September 2017. The new star feature here is Plasma Vault, an ability to protect your folder with password. You can try it on the latest KDE neon before the Plasma finally released next October. Here is a quick look to the new things on KDE Plasma on neon dev-unstable.

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More in Tux Machines

Applications: Snapcraft, Cutegram, LaTeX Editors, Spreadsheet Editors (Like Calc), Vivaldi

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
  • Why microservices are a security issue
    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more

today's leftovers

  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client
    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements. qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.
  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape
    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays
    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C. Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.
  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs
    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online. To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.