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KDE

KDE neon Comes Alive!

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KDE

We’ve been working hard at KDE neon HQ to get the project going and today I’m pleased to say the Developer Unstable package archive is up and running. This gives daily packages of KDE Frameworks and Plasma desktop built direct from Git master branches. Expect some breakage, it’s called unstable for a reason. Ideal for testers and contributors to these two projects. To install it you’ll need an install of *buntu 15.10 (wily) and follow the Package Upgrade instructions.

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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE

KDE Applications 15.2.2 and Frameworks 5.19.0 now available

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KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users, together with several other package updates.

Applications get updated to 15.12.2 and according to the official announcement 'more than 30 recorded bugfixes include improvements to kdelibs, kdepim, kdenlive, marble, konsole, spectacle, akonadi, ark and umbrello'.

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KDE News, Development

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Development
KDE
  • Call to Co-maintainers of Cantor

    Cantor, the software to scientific programming in worksheet-style interface, had (and has!) several developers working in different parts of the code along the years. Thanks to the plugin-based architecture of Cantor, a developer can to create a new backend to communicate with some new programming language, an assistant, or some other piece of software, requiring just the knowledge of Cantor API.

  • Where are my noble gases? I need MORE noble gases!

    As KDE software (be it the Frameworks libraries, the Plasma 5 workspace, or the Applications) develops during a normal release cycle, a lot of things happen. New and exciting features emerge, bugs get fixed, and the software becomes better and more useful than it was before. Thanks to code review and continuous integration, the code quality of KDE software has also tremendously improved. Given how things are improving, it is tempting to follow development as it happens. Sounds exciting?

  • New openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap Live Images Give Users the Latest KDE Updates

    After informing the openSUSE Tumbleweed user base on February 17 about the fact that the development of snapshots is going a bit slow, which turned out to be something temporary, Douglas DeMaio now talks about some cool new features.

Plasma in all colors you like

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KDE

The Plasma theme system had a feature (since many years, actually) in which SVG elements done in a certain way can be recolored with colors coming from a theme file.
The Breeze Plasma theme (and now all the monochrome Breeze icons too) was all done in this way, in part to prepare what I’m, presenting today.

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Also: Tooltip handling

KDE Applications 15.12.2 Released for KDE Plasma 5.5 with over 30 Bugfixes

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KDE
Security

Just a few moments ago, February 16, 2016, KDE had the pleasure of announcing the release and general availability of the second maintenance build in the stable KDE Applications 15.12 series.

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KDE Applications 16.04 Suite for KDE Plasma 5.6 to Arrive on April 20, 2016

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KDE

Thanks to Michael Larabel from Phoronix, who spotted this earlier, it would appear that KDE published a preliminary release schedule for its upcoming KDE Applications 16.04 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment.

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KDE Applications 16.04 Release Schedule

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KDE

The release schedule for the upcoming KDE Applications 16.04 bundle has been firmed up.

The approved release schedule puts the KDE Applications 16.04 release on 20 April, while leading up to that is the dependency freeze on 16 March, the 16.04 freeze and beta release on 23 March, and the release candidate on 6 April.

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KDE's new Linux distro: Terrible idea, or simply a huge mistake?

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KDE

Third… having a specific KDE distro at all seems a bit strange, at least to me (and I am only speaking for myself here, and not any project I am involved with). Having a distro that decides to build its own desktop environment is one thing (a la the Ubuntu team building Unity), but having a desktop environment (one that has put so much focus on being portable) that decides to build its own distro? I can see a whole mess of problems cropping up around that. Ranging from relationship issues with existing distributions using KDE to development and QA issues for a portable desktop environment when there is now a single, standard distro that the KDE project standardizes around.

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GNOME and KDE

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KDE
GNOME

GNOME

  • Updates on GNOME Calculator

    The biggest task I’ve been trying to accomplish is to move all the UI code to GtkBuilder .ui files and rework the codebase to use them as reusable templates.

  • Developer Experience Hackfest 2016

    First of all I would like to thanks the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring once again my trip to Brussels for the GNOME Developer Experience Hackfest.
    Besides hacking on Glade and attending FOSDEM I had a great time meeting with old friends and making new ones, not to mention the amount and variety of beers consumed

KDE

  • Some Neon Artwork

    This is pretty exciting for anyone who wants a stable core system with a setup of KDE Plasma software on to as recent as possible, setted-up and configured as good as possible, with hopefully less issues like “distro X has a slightly outdated version of kibrary Y which is know that makes app Z crash”.

  • HIG about Simple vs. Advanced Settings

    Recently the question was asked in the KDE forums how we handle advanced settings. While there is neither a best practice nor a common approach in KDE software, we actually discussed a similar concept in respect to the Plasma control modules (KCM).

    The updated organization of KCMs was implemented by the developers, the community decided about the basic layout, and a couple of proposals were done [1, 2]. So why don't generalize this idea and write a guideline?

  • 3DPrinterChat -Your 3DPrint Community

    Last week I received and invitation to be a columnist on a blog about 3DPrinting, 3DPrinterChat, and I already made 3 blog posts. It’s amazing. I’m learning more about 3dprinting and sharing the knowledge that I have. It’s a wonderfull website to people that want know more about 3dprinting and how to start use a 3dprinter.

  • Outside the Stellarator

    After having spent a great deal of time improving Plasma, I recently focussed on other ares of our workspace, such as KRunner, and various KDE Applications.

  • Heavy activities setup

    I’ve always had more than a few activities lying around - mainly one for each project I’m working on. Be it KDE, Work, Studies, etc. But I was basing my workflow not only on them, but also on virtual desktops. I had four of them, the first one to keep the web browser and the mail client in, two for actual work (that is related to the current activity), and the last one to keep the music player in.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.