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KDE

KDE Development, Randa, and GSoC

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KDE

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • Wayland in Plasma 5.7

    Last week we released the beta version of Plasma 5.7 which means we know what this release will have for better Wayland support. First of all I need to mention what didn’t make it: unfortunately I missed the freeze of Frameworks 5.23 to land support for xdg-shell. I have a working implementation, but was not yet satisfied with the API. This is a difficult interface to provide an API for due to the unstable nature of the interface. Due to lack of xdg-shell support GTK applications are still going to use X11 on Wayland (like the Firefox window I’m just typing this blog post in).

  • The State Of Wayland For KDE Plasma 5.7

    There are a lot of Wayland support improvements to find in the upcoming release of KDE's Plasma 5.7.

    Wayland advancements for KDE Plasma 5.7 include the improved task manager, virtual keyboard support, sub-surface support, improved input device support, and more. However, missing from Plasma 5.7 is their XDG-Shell support as the API wasn't stabilized in time.

  • Qt 5.6.1-1 Released

    The problem with Qt 5.6.1, reported in QTBUG-53761, is that certain Qt Quick applications crash after some time. The problem occurs with code that loads more than 64 components (.qml or .js files) without instantiating objects from all of them. The components that initially don’t get instantiated will then be removed from the type cache, which causes problems if you later try to instantiate objects from them. Reason for the problem is too aggressive trimming of the QML type cache, which ends up deleting some QML types even though they were still in use by the application.

  • Qt 5.6.1-1 Released To Fix A Critical Problem

    Qt 5.6.1 was released earlier this month to fix outstanding issues with the Qt 5.6 tool-kit release while today the 5.6.1-1 hot-fix release is available to fix a critical problem.

    Slipping into Qt 5.6.1 was a regression that prevented certain types of Qt Quick applications from working correctly. This issue with Qt 5.6.1 would cause Qt Quick applications to crash but did not affect the newer Qt 5.7.0 release.

  • Call for submissions for the 2016 Art of Krita Book

    The Krita Foundation is going to publish a glossy, shiny book of art created with Krita! This book will be sent out to the seventy Kickstarter backers who selected the artbook as their reward, and it will be available from the Krita shop. We’ll also try and make sure it’s available through online bookshops! It’s the very first time the Krita Foundation will publish a book, and we’re really excited about it.

  • Interview with Jennifer Reuter

    If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be, and why?

  • Farewell to the Mountains

    So the last train has left Randa, and we can look back at a — judging from the bugs that were fixed and the ideas that were traded and the code that was written — successful sprint. The last two days were characterized by the authentic Randa Internet experience, in which a mountain goat eats 18% of the packets, but that doesn’t stop KDE developers from writing code and sharing AppImages.

  • KDE neon Press Coverage and Comments

    KDE neon User Edition 5.6 came out a couple of weeks ago, let’s have a look at the commentry.

  • My LaKademy 2016

    In the end of May, ~20 gearheads from different countries of Latin America were together in Rio de Janeiro working in several fronts of the KDE. This is our ‘multiple projects sprint’ named LaKademy!

    Like all previous editions of LaKademy, this year I worked hard in Cantor; unlike all previous editions, this year I did some work in new projects to be released in some point in the future. So, let’s see my report of LaKademy 2016.

  • Doxyqml 0.3.0 released

    The master branch of Doxyqml, a QML input filter for Doxygen, had been waiting for a release for a long time. Olivier Churlaud, the new KApidox hero, reported that it did not work with Python 3 and submitted a patch to fix this.

  • Cutelyst 0.12.0 is out!

    Cutelyst a web framework built with Qt is now closer to have it’s first stable release, with it becoming 3 years old at the end of the year I’m doing my best to finally iron it to get an API/ABI compromise, this release is full of cool stuff and a bunch of breaks which most of the time just require recompiling.

  • Peruse 1.0 "The Birthday Release"

    One day, about half a year or so ago, it came up in a discussion that while we in KDE have a lovely document viewer named Okular, we don't have something that is well suited to actually reading things, comic books in particular. So, a project was hatched to fix this. I've blogged about it before, and made a few tweets on the topic, but today is special. Today, 1.0 happens.

KDE Neon: The Rock & Roll Distribution

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KDE

What does it mean when developers behind one of the world's most popular desktop environments decide to jump into the deep end and fork a distribution? Depending on who you ask you’ll hear madness, excellence, confusion, and excitement as onlookers figure out the exact nature of a new breed of beast and guess what it will do.

KDE neon is a new distribution freshly forked from Ubuntu being driven by prominent KDE contributors and figures. When initially announced some mixed messages marred the event, but since then the project has found its footing and expectations are seemingly being set...

Neon is entirely unique as a product produced by a community which always made generalist software; Plasma and KDE software is offered by Suse, Red Hat, Arch, Slack, any distribution you can name. Neon is in direct competition with those systems, and several people decried this new distribution as opening the potential for favouritism.

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Linux kernel 4.5.7, Plasma 5.6.5, Applications 16.04.2 and Frameworks 5.23.0 available in Chakra

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KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users, together with other package updates,

Plasma 5.6.5 includes a month's worth of bugfixes and new translations, with most changes being related to plasma desktop, plasma workspace and kwin.

Applications 16.04.2 include more than 25 recorded bugfixes and improvements to 'akonadi, ark, artikulate, dolphin. kdenlive, kdepim, among others'.

Frameworks 5.23.0 include bugfixes and improvements to breeze icons, plasma framework, kio and ktexteditor, among others.

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Qt News

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Development
KDE
  • The Qt Company Is Still Aiming To Get Qt 5.8 Out This Year

    This year has already encountered the releases of the much-delayed Qt 5.6 followed quite quickly by Qt 5.7.

  • QtWebKit Technology Preview 2
  • New Technology Preview Of QtWebKit

    There's a new technology preview release of QtWebKit for those wanting to use this formerly retired WebKit-based module instead of the newer QtWebEngine that makes use of Chromium's Blink engine.

    As covered earlier this month, QtWebKit has been aiming for a return by interested developers wishing to continue to leverage WebKit in Qt applications rather than moving over to Qt WebEngine. Konstantin Tokarev who has been leading the revival on QtWebKit announced the release of its second technology preview release.

Krita Funding

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KDE
  • GSoC 2016: Soft proofing, Gamut alarms and looks update.

    Partially, this week was spent on me recuperating from my exam-week and the Krita Kickstarter. After that, delving into the jungle that is Pigment, which is Krita’s colour management library, for abstracting the caching and handling of colour managed colours. It’s a bit of a jungle of templates and class inheritance. This part is where living at my mentor for a week was helpful, as communicating some of the problems I bumped into(mostly confusing class names and how to avoid having to rewrite the caching graph), would’ve been too difficult to do over IRC.

  • The 2016 Kickstarter

    This year's kickstarter fundraising campaign for Krita was more nerve-wracking than the previous two editions. Although we ended up 135% funded, we were almost afraid we wouldn't make it, around the middle. Maybe only the release of Krita 3.0 turned the campaign around. Here's my chaotic and off-the-cuff analysis of this campaign.

A Week in Qt/KDE/Randa

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KDE

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta
  • KDE Plasma 5.7 to Ship with Huge Wayland Improvements, New System Tray

    Today, June 17, 2016, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing that the Beta of the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment is now available for public beta testing.

    Initially planned for June 16, KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta is here, and we can finally see what the KDE developers have prepared for fans of the modern, Qt5-based desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems. And just by taking a quick look at the release notes, we can notice that a lot of goodies are coming.

  • KDE e.V. joins advisory board of The Document Foundation

    The Document Foundation announces that KDE e.V. is joining the organization’s Advisory Board, and at the same time The Document Foundation joins KDE’s group of advising community partners as an affiliate.

  • GNOME & KDE Join The Document Foundation Advisory Board

    The GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. have joined the Advisory Board of The Document Foundation.

    The GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. have joined TDF's Advisory Board while in exchange The Document Foundation now has a seat on the boards of both GNOME and KDE. The press message The Document Foundation sent out this morning explained, "The objective is to strengthen relationships between the largest not for profit organizations focused on open source software, to foster the growth of the entire ecosystem."

  • The Qt Company Releases Qt 5.7
  • Qt 5.7 GUI Toolkit Released with Raspberry Pi 3 Support, Qt Creator 4.0

    Today, June 16, 2016, the Qt Company was proud to announce the final release and general availability of the long-anticipated Qt 5.7 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit for all supported platforms.

    As many of you expected, Qt 5.7 is a major release that brings exciting new features and technologies for any and all Qt application developers out there, no matter if they're using a GNU/Linux distribution or the latest Windows 10 and macOS operating systems.

KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta Release

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KDE

This release brings an all-new login screen design completing the Breeze startup experience we trialed in Plasma 5.6. The layout has been tidied up and is more suitable for workstations that are part of a domain or company network. The Air and Oxygen Plasma themes which we still fully support for users that prefer a more three-dimensional design have also been improved.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta Released

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more