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Krita 3.2.0 Released

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KDE
  • Krita 3.2.0 Released

    Later than planned, here’s Krita 3.2.0! With the new G’Mic-qt plugin integration, the smart patch tool, finger painting on touch screens, new brush presets and a lot of bug fixes. Read the full release notes for more information!. Here’s GDQuest’s video introducing 3.2.0:

  • Krita 3.2 Released For Leading Open-Source Digital Painting

    The Krita project has today announced version 3.2 is ready of their open-source, cross-platform digital painting program.

    Krita 3.2 features new G'Mic-qt plugin integration, a smart patch tool, finger painting on touch screens, new brush presets, a variety of fixes, and other minor improvements.

Releases: PostgreSQL 10 Beta 3 and KDE Frameworks 5.37

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KDE
Server
OSS
  • PostgreSQL 10 Beta 3 Released!

    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the third beta release of PostgreSQL 10 is available for download. This release contains previews of all of the features which will be available in the final release of version 10, including fixes to many of the issues found in the second beta. Users are encouraged to begin testing their applications against 10 beta3.

  • PostgreSQL 10 Beta 3 Arrives

    Those wishing to do some database testing this weekend can try out PostgreSQL 10's third beta update, which was released earlier this week.

    Postgre developers are hoping those making use of this SQL database system will try their workloads against PostgreSQL 10 Beta 3. It has all the features to be found in this next stable release and has many bug fixes over the prior versions.

  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.37.0
  • KDE Frameworks 5.37 Released

    Ending out the weekend, the KDE crew has released Frameworks 5.37 as the collection of complementary components to Qt5.

KDE Frameworks 5.37.0 Released for KDE Plasma 5 Desktops with 119 Changes

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KDE

KDE on Sunday announced the release and general availability of the monthly maintenance update of the KDE Frameworks collection of over 70 add-on libraries for Qt, versioned 5.37.0.

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Release GCompris Qt 0.80

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KDE
Sci/Tech

We are pleased to announce the release of GCompris version 0.80.

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KDE: Qt, Slimbook, Brooklyn, KWayland and KWin, Akademy

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KDE
  • Let There Be More Shapes!

    As a follow-up to the previous post about the upcoming new Shape element, I am happy to share that the feature set is going to be bigger than previously expected, and this applies already to the upcoming 5.10 release of Qt.

  • A laptop by KDE

    Earlier this year we announced a joint venture between KDE and Slimbook that we named the KDE Slimbook.

    Last Akademy we had the opportunity to meet the Slimbook team and discuss its purpose and future. I’m quite happy about the discussions, here’s my feedback.

  • How to extend Brooklyn with new chat protocols

    Do you like Brooklyn but you use a chat protocol which is not officially supported?
    All you have to do is following this tutorial step by step!

    First of all, you have to check if there is a Java library for the protocol whereby you want to create the bot.
    If it doesn't exist, you've to write it by yourself (as I did to support Rocket.Chat). Then, add the library you have just created to Maven.
    Finally import it on Brooklyn through Maven.

  • Another iteration and one tough bug

    I didn’t want to give up and so I looked through the KWayland and KWin code related to pointer locking and confinement, which is a lot. Hours later I finally found the root cause: KWin creates small on screen notifications when a pointer is locked or confined to a window. Most of the time this works without problem, but with the above patch to Xwayland the client sends in quick succession the pointer confine and lock requests to KWin and for some reason when trying to show both notifications at the same time KWin or maybe the QML engine for the notification can’t process any further. Without the patch Xwayland always only sent the confinement request and nothing blocked. I don’t know how Martin would like to have this issue solved so I created a bug report for now. It’s weird that it was such a petty cause in the end with such huge consequences, but that’s how it goes.

  • Akademy (22-27) 2017

Latte Dock 0.7

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KDE
Software

KDE: Qt 5.10, Akademy and More

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KDE
  • [Development] First Qt 5.10 (pre-alpha) binary snapshot available

    We have finally first binary snapshot (pre-alpha) available for Qt 5.10 via online installer. You can do clean installation by using online installer or add this under existing online installation by using its maintenance tool (detailed instructions here: https://wiki.qt.io/How_to_get_snapshot_via_online_installer). You will find Qt 5.10 under 'preview' node from installer UI.

  • A Binary Snapshot Of Qt 5.10 To Begin Testing This Next Toolkit Update

    It's considered pre-alpha quality so most of you will probably want to avoid it, but those wanting to easily test out the early Qt 5.10 state at least now have a binary package.

    Jani Heikkinen of The Qt Company announced this morning a pre-alpha binary snapshot of Qt 5.10 using their online installer. Details or to grab it via this mailing list post.

  • One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

    Back in 2013, when I last wrote something on the topic, I suppose I was having to manage the transition of Kubuntu from KDE 3 to KDE 4 on another person’s computer, perhaps not having to encounter this yet on my own Debian system. This transition required me to confront the arguably dubious user interface design decisions made for KDE 4. I had to deal with things like the way the desktop background no longer behaved as it had done on most systems for many years, requiring things like the “folder view” widget to show desktop icons. Disappointingly, my most recent experience involved revisiting and replaying some of these annoyances.

  • Another successful Akademy! Neon team BoF, snappy and more.

    This year's akademy held in Almeria, Spain was a great success.

    We ( the neon team ) have decided to move to using snappy container format for KDE applications in KDE Neon.
    This will begin in the dev/unstable builds while we sort out the kinks and heavily test it. We still have some roadblocks to overcome, but hope to work with the snappy team to resolve them.

  • Akademy; at 20, KDE reaches out

    Some of the talks, initiatives, conversations, and workshops that inspired me at Akademy. Thanks so much for the e.V. for sponsoring me.

KDE: Akademy 2017 and Brooklyn 0.2

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KDE
  • Akademy 2017 Review

    Akademy 2017 was held in Almeria, Spain for a week full of discussion around the Plasma project. Our VDG team was represented by Jens Reutenberg (jensreu) and Andy Betts (anditosan). Our aim at the event was to provide help to many of the developers who gathered at the event and needed help in designing new applications using guidelines or just coming up with design ideas.

  • Akademy group photo time series

    Akademy is the oldest yearly meeting of KDE programmers. This year I attended for the tenth time.

    Dublin in 2006 was my first Akademy. I will never forget it. It was my first time meeting the people from whom I learned so much.

  • KDE Brooklyn Chat Bridge Declared Production-Ready

    The GSoC student developer working on "Brooklyn", the protocol-independent chat bridge for KDE systems and written in Java, has declared his project a success. In ending out the GSoC summer work, he has released Brooklyn v0.2 and has deemed it ready for production use.

    The Brooklyn chat program for KDE as of version 0.2 supports the Telegram, IRC, and Rocket Chat services.

  • Brooklyn 0.2 released, ready for production

    For Debian 9 users who want to use it without too many configurations, there is an Ansible config ready to be used.

KDE Plasma 5: The Silent Revolution

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KDE

For years, I fell into the habit that the age of innovation in desktop environments had ended because of users protesting new releases of GNOME and KDE, and the lukewarm response to Ubuntu's Unity. After about 2012, the largest innovations on the desktop appeared to be coming from Linux Mint, half of whose efforts were devoted to MATE, a fork of GNOME 2, which was first released in 2002, and half to developing Cinnamon as a full- featured desktop,a process now well-advanced.

Armed with this view, I frequently characterized Plasma 4 as a kitchen-sink desktop, more concerned with cramming in any remotely useful feature than in improving the user experience. In marked contrast to GNOME 3, Plasma 4 frequently repositioned features. Particularly in the Systems Settings, new features were dumped in an Advanced tab, and took several releases to be suitably positioned.

Meanwhile, Plasma 5 came out in 2014. It was discussed mostly in terms of updating Plasma to use the Qt 5 toolkit and streamlining the code. Moreover, because KDE projects have different releases schedules, most distributions were slow to switch to Plasma 5. I saw it in virtual machines, but I rarely used it for prolonged periods.

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Also: Akademy 2017 in Retrospect

KDE and Qt: GCompris, Krita, Qt and QML

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KDE
  • GCompris- Digital Electricity

    The Digital Electricity activity in GCompris aims at creating and simulating a digital electric schema. Currently, there exists a “Free Mode”, where a user can freely create and check the working of a circuit on their own. During the final month of the GSoC period, I will be adding a “Tutorial Mode” alongside the existing free mode. The tutorial mode is aimed at teaching the users how the individual components work in a digital circuit.

  • Krita 3.2.0: We Have a Release Candidate!

    After last week’s rollercoaster ride (if you haven’t seen it, check the news, then the update!), it was hard to get back into making releases and writing code. Yet, here is the release candidate for Krita 3.2.0.

  • New in Qt 5.10: Diagnostics when breaking QML bindings

    Property bindings are one of the most interesting features of the QML language. In QML, when we set a value on a property, the right hand side expression isn’t evaluated just once to produce a value, like in a ordinary imperative language.

  • Qt talks at CppCon 2017

    CppCon is the annual conference for the C++ community: five days packed with over 100 talks, as well as inspiring keynotes, panel discussions, hallway chats, fun evening events and much more. CppCon is a project of the Standard C++ Foundation, a not-for-profit organization whose purpose is to support the C++ software developer community and promote the understanding and use of modern, standard C++ on all compilers and platforms.

  • If your software should be cross platform and accessible, forget about Qt

    A few years ago, I started to write software which primary audience is going to be blind musicians. I did a small presentation of the UI at DebConf15.

    Most of the functionality is in a compiler-alike backend. But eventually, I wanted to create a user interface to improve the interactive experience.

    So, the problem again: which toolkit to choose which would be accessible on most platforms? Last time I needed to solve a similar problem, I used Java/Swing. This has its problems, but it actually works on Windows, Linux and (supposedly) Mac. This time around, my implementation language is C++, so Swing didn't look that interesting. It appears there is not much that fullfils these requirements. Qt looked like it could. But since I had my bad experiences already with Qt claiming accessibility they really never implemented, I was at least a bit cautious. Around 10 years ago, when Qt 4 was released, I found that the documentation claimed that Qt4 was accessible on Linux, but it really never was until a very late 4.x release. This information was a blatant lie, trying to lure uninformed programmers into using Qt, much to the disservice of their disabled users. If you ask a random blind Windows user who knows a bit about toolkits, they will readily tell you that they hate every app written in Qt.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 17.10 Launches Tomorrow with GNOME 3.26, but You Can Still Use Unity

Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche shared today the last blog article for the development cycle of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, which is expected to launch tomorrow, October 19. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.10 is back on track with GNOME: Here's why that's a good thing

KDE Applications 17.12 GNU/Linux Software Stack Set to Arrive on December 14

Now that the KDE Applications 17.08 software suite got its second point release, it's time for the KDE developers to concentrate their efforts on the next major update, KDE Applications 17.12. Read more

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 16

All good things must come to an end, however, in that particular case, it’s rather a beginning! We are indeed almost done in our road to Artful, which means that 17.10 is just around the corner: official Ubuntu 17.10 release is due tomorrow. Of course, it doesn’t mean we stop right away working on it: you will have bug fixes and security updates for 9 months of support! It’s thus time to close this series on Artful, and for this, we are going to tackle one topic we didn’t get to yet, which is quite important approaching the release: upgrading from a previous Ubuntu release! For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post. Read more

Trying Out System76's Pop!_OS Ubuntu-Based Operating System

Besides Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" launching tomorrow, System76 is also expected to issue their first official release of the Ubuntu-derived Pop!_OS operating system they plan to begin shipping on their laptops/desktops. Curious about their modifications to Ubuntu 17.10, I decided to give the latest snapshot of it a ride. For those that missed the earlier news this summer, back in June is when System76 announced Pop!_OS as the Linux distribution to be shipped on their future PCs/laptops. System76 had been shipping stock Ubuntu installations on their systems since its founding in 2005, but with Ubuntu shifting from Unity back to GNOME Shell and other changes, System76 found it time to give their own take on a Linux desktop OS. Read more