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Gentoo

Gentoo-Based exGENT Linux Now Available for Raspberry Pi 4

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OS
Gentoo

Developer Arne Exton is experimenting with new projects and released a version of his exGENT Linux distribution for the latest Raspberry Pi 4 single-board computer.

Based on Gentoo Linux, exGENT is a distro created by Arne Exton and designed for advanced Linux users and anyone else who really wants to learn Linux. It’s one of the very few up-to-date live Gentoo systems.

While exGENT Linux is fun to use on the desktop, you can now use it on your tiny Raspberry Pi 4 computer thanks to the hard work by developer Arne Exton.

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Porteus Kiosk 5.0 Released with Linux 5.4 LTS, Many Improvements

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Gentoo

It’s been more almost six months since the last Porteus Kiosk release and the team lead by Tomasz Jokiel proudly unveiled today a new major series of the Gentoo-based operating system that lets you transform a computer into a versatile and flexible kiosk system.

Porteus Kiosk 5.0 includes major software upgrades, starting with the kernel, which has been updated to the long-term supported Linux 5.4 series. Linux kernel 5.4.23 LTS is included in this first release of the 5.0 series, adding better support for newer hardware and many other benefits.

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Michał Górny on Python in Gentoo

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Development
Gentoo
  • Gentoo Python Guide

    Gentoo provides one of the best frameworks for providing Python support in packages among operating systems. This includes support for running multiple versions of Python (while most other distributions avoid going beyond simultaneous support for Python 2 and one version of Python 3), alternative implementations of Python, reliable tests, deep QA checks. While we aim to keep things simple, this is not always possible.

    At the same time, the available documentation is limited and not always up-to-date. Both the built-in eclass documentation and Python project wiki page provide bits of documentation but they are mostly in reference form and not very suitable for beginners nor people who do not actively follow the developments within the ecosystem. This results in suboptimal ebuilds, improper dependencies, missing tests.

  • No more PYTHON_TARGETS in single-r1

    Since its inception in 2012, python-single-r1 has been haunting users with two sets of USE flags: PYTHON_TARGETS and PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET. While this initially seemed a necessary part of the grand design, today I know we could have done better. Today this chymera is disappearing for real, and python-single-r1 are going to use PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET flags only.

    I would like to take this opportunity to explain why the eclass has been designed this way in the first place, and what has been done to change that.

    Why PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET?

Pentoo – A Security-Focused Linux Distro Based on Gentoo

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Gentoo
Security

Pentoo is an open-source Live CD and Live USB Gentoo Linux-based operating system designed for experts in the field of penetration testing and security assessment. It is available for both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures and is can be run as an overlay on an existing Gentoo installation.

If you’re not familiar with Gentoo Linux, it is an advanced Linux distro that enables users to compile their operating system from the source in other to enjoy advantages such as applications and optimal performance specific to the computer, to mention a couple.

It does not have an installer and users are to translate the software they want before continuing with the installation. In short, one shouldn’t go near it if they don’t have the perseverance for filing through Linux documentation.

Just like with Gentoo, Pentoo has an advanced Python-based package management system with cool features such as “fake” (OpenBSD-style) installs, system profiles, config file management, safe unmerging, and virtual packages, among others.

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exGENT 2020 Linux Distro Makes Gentoo Fun to Use with the LXQt Desktop

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Linux
Gentoo

Arne Exton’s exGENT GNU/Linux distribution aims to continue the tradition of Gentoo-based live distros with a new release that puts the latest LXQt 0.14.1 desktop environment in the spotlight.

We all know by now that Gentoo is one of the hardest Linux-based operating systems to install due to packages needing to be compiled from sources locally. But the good thing about Gentoo is that it doesn’t uses a one-size fits all approach, which mens that it can be fully optimized for specific hardware.

Newcomers who want to try Gentoo Linux on their personal computer have a hard time due to the lack of Gentoo-based live distributions. Here’s where exGENT Linux comes into play, promising to offer users an up-to-date Gentoo-based live system that can be installed in a few minutes.

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Meet Calculate Linux 20!

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Gentoo

For this new (year) release, Gentoo 17.1 was used as the base profile, all binary packages recompiled with GCC 9.2, and overlays managed with eselect. Calculate Linux will no longer come in 32 bits.

Are available for download: Calculate Linux Desktop featuring the KDE (CLD), Cinnamon (CLDC), LXQt (CLDL), Mate (CLDM) or else Xfce (CLDX and CLDXS) scientific, Calculate Directory Server (CDS), Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS) and Calculate Scratch Server (CSS).

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Also: Gentoo-Based Calculate Linux 20 Released To Ring In The New Year, Free Of 32-Bit Support

Calculate Linux 20 Now Available For Download

Michał Górny: A distribution kernel for Gentoo

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

The traditional Gentoo way of getting a kernel is to install the sources, and then configure and build one yourself. For those who didn’t want to go through the tedious process of configuring it manually, an alternative route of using genkernel was provided. However, neither of those variants was able to really provide the equivalent of kernels provided by binary distributions.

I have manually configured the kernels for my private systems long time ago. Today, I wouldn’t really have bothered. In fact, I realized that for some time I’m really hesitant to even upgrade them because of the effort needed to update configuration. The worst part is, whenever a new kernel does not boot, I have to ask myself: is it a real bug, or is it my fault for configuring it wrong?

I’m not alone in this. Recently Михаил Коляда has talked to me about providing binary kernels for Gentoo. While I have not strictly implemented what he had in mind, he inspired me to start working on a distribution kernel. The goal was to create a kernel package that users can install to get a working kernel with minimal effort, and that would be upgraded automatically as part of regular @world upgrades.

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Also: Gentoo Developers Exploring The Possibility Of Shipping Distribution Binary Kernels

Chrome OS 79 Adds Media Controls in Lock Screen, Mouse Acceleration Control

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GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google

Just a few days after the release of its Chrome 79 web browser, Google promoted the Chrome OS 79 Linux-based operating system for Chromebooks to the stable channel, rolling out now to all supported devices.

Based on the recently released Google Chrome 79 web browser, which landed for Linux, Android, macOS, and Windows platforms last week, Chrome OS 79 is here with a bunch of improvements and new features, starting with media controls in the lock screen to make it more convenient for users to control their media.

The new media controls in lock screen feature allows users to control their media right from the lock screen when they're listening to audio on their Chromebook. Users will be able to play, pause, and skip audio tracks Spotify, YouTube Music, and many other apps without unlocking their Chromebook.

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Funtoo Linux 1.4 Released

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GNU
Linux
Gentoo

Drobbins has announced the new release of Funtoo Linux 1.4 on Sep 11, 2019.

This release is based on a 21 June 2019 snapshot of Gentoo Linux with significant updates to key parts of the system, such as compiler and OpenGL subsystem.

This is the fourth release of the Funtoo Linux 1.x series, which may be the last update of this release, as the developer said he would start developing 2.0 a month later.

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A Look at Redcore Linux: Gentoo based Linux Distribution

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GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Reviews

Many people in the technology world have heard, at least in passing, of the Linux distribution Gentoo. Gentoo is one of the most famous distributions to the point of becoming a joke; with it’s complexity and depth, installing Gentoo has been a daunting task for many.

Redcore is one of the latest distributions to attempt to bring the power of Gentoo to the everyday user.

I previously wrote an article in 2017 about Sabayon Linux, another popular Gentoo based system; but Redcore Linux holds its own and pulls its own weight.

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More in Tux Machines

Best Photo Editors for Linux

This article will cover a list of free and open-source image editors available for Linux. These applications feature basic tools for simple editing needs as well as advanced utilities for professional artists. GIMP If you are a regular Linux user, chances are that you must have heard about GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) or used it to edit images. It is considered to be one of the most comprehensive, free, and open source image editing software available not only on Linux, but also on other operating systems like Windows and macOS. While some users may prefer proprietary tools like Photoshop over it, GIMP itself is packed with tons of features and can do almost everything that Photoshop is capable of. You can see all major features of GIMP available at here and here. GIMP can be extended using plugins, some of them come with the official installation while others can be downloaded from third party websites. [...] RawTherapee RawTherapee is an open source image editing software specially designed for processing and handling “raw” images. You can also import and edit image files having other formats. RawTherapee features various utilities for processing raw images including color enhancement tools, compositing and masking utilities, pixel correction tools and HDR utilities. Read more

5 Best Free and Open source NAS Software for Linux

In the 21st century, huge innovations have been made in various sectors, particularly the technological region, which has completely changed the world’s dimensions. The strides at which new technology has been developed and improved upon from its predecessors would surely be something that our ancestors would marvel at. Humans have gone in a very short time from making stone arrows and straw huts to developing smartphones and automated robots, and these advancements are continuously growing without slowing down. However, this huge transition has also brought forward some adverse effects as our machines are now subjected to more cyber-attacks and security issues. Data is one of the most important factors in the world today, and it is exactly that which is the most vulnerable. Therefore, it is necessary to implement procedures that would help in keeping your data secure. One excellent way is to use NAS software, which helps in keeping backups of your data. This shall also be the topic of our discussion in this article, where we will be looking at the top 5 free and open-source NAS software available on Linux. Read more

Pioneer DDJ-RR DJ Controller To Be Supported By The Linux 5.11 Kernel

For aspiring DJs wanting to mix beats under Linux, the Pioneer DJ DDJ-RR controller should be working come Linux 5.11 early next year. The Pioneer DDJ-RR is quite a capable ~$699 USD DJ controller that offers the mixing potential of many higher-end Pioneer DDJ devices but at a lower price point and geared for introductory DJs. The DDJ-RR is a two-channel controller and offers all of the common dedicated controls most DJs would make use of while offering high quality audio output. The DDJ-RR is designed to be used under Windows with the Rekordbox DJ software. However, this DJ controller will now work with Linux 5.11+ so it can be used with software like the open-source Mixxx DJ software package. Read more

Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 20.11

With Genode 20.11, we focused on the scalability of real-world application workloads, and nurtured Genode's support for 64-bit ARM hardware. We thereby follow the overarching goal to run highly sophisticated Genode-based systems on devices of various form factors. When speaking of real-world workloads, we acknowledge that we cannot always know the exact behavior of applications. The system must deal gracefully with many unknowns: The roles and CPU intensity of threads, the interplay of application code with I/O, memory-pressure situations, or the sudden fragility of otherwise very useful code. The worst case must always be anticipated. In traditional operating systems, this implies that the OS kernel needs to be aware of certain behavioral patterns of the applications, and has to take decisions based on heuristics. Think of CPU scheduling, load balancing among CPU cores, driving power-saving features of the hardware, memory swapping, caching, and responding to near-fatal situations like OOM. Genode allows us to move such complex heuristics outside the kernel into dedicated components. Our new CPU balancer described in Section CPU-load balancing is a living poster child of our approach. With this optional component, a part of a Genode system can be subjected to a CPU-load balancing policy of arbitrary complexity without affecting the quality of service of unrelated components, and without polluting the OS kernel with complexity. A second aspect of real-world workloads is that they are usually not designed for Genode. To accommodate the wealth of time tested applications, we need to bridge the massive gap between APIs of olde (think of POSIX) and Genode's clean-slate interfaces. Section Streamlined ioctl handling in the C runtime / VFS shows how the current release leverages our novel VFS concept for the emulation of traditional ioctl-based interfaces. So useful existing applications come to live without compromising the architectural benefits of Genode. Platform-wise, the new release continues our mission to host Genode-based systems such as Sculpt OS on 64-bit ARM hardware. This work entails intensive development of device drivers and the overall driver architecture. Section Sculpt OS on 64-bit ARM hardware (i.MX8 EVK) reports on the achievement of bringing Sculpt to 64-bit i.MX8 hardware. This line of work goes almost hand in hand with the improvements of our custom virtual machine monitor for ARM as outlined in Section Multicore virtualization on ARM. Read more Also: Genode OS Framework 20.11 Brings Dynamic CPU Load Balancing, 64-bit ARM Sculpt OS