Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gentoo

Linux Sea, an online book on Gentoo Linux

Filed under
Gentoo

Sven Vermeulen: With the summer at hand and my daughter on the way, I thought it would be a good idea to put the current work for this (end-user) document online. On my developer page you can find the current draft of Linux Sea, a book on Gentoo Linux.

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 28 July 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org/news: Welcome to the July issue of the Gentoo monthly newsletter! Since our last issue, Gentoo Linux 2008.0 has been released and the Gentoo Security Team held a meeting on July 14, 2008. In howtos: this guide will show you a method for trying to recover just about any deleted file.

Crummy Stats on the Gentoo 2008.0 release

Filed under
Gentoo

robbat2.livejournal: Ok, so this isn't a full one week period yet, but I'm going to be out tonight probably, so 8 hours ahead of time is close enough. This is just a quick scrape of the numbers.

Gentoo 2008.0-r1 may help if you've had LiveCD problems

Filed under
Gentoo

For those unfortunate souls who couldn't boot, install, or burn the LiveCD, we've provided the 2008.0-r1 revision bump. It fixes these specific problems:

Is Gentoo Ready for Latest Linux Release?

Filed under
Gentoo

internetnews.com: Linux distributions often live and die on the strength of their respective communities. Such is the case with the Gentoo Linux distribution, which canceled its last release in 2007 but has now emerged in 2008 with a new release. Tanned, rested and ready?

Evolution, Linux, and Gentoo

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

cookingwithlinux.com: I was first introduced to Linux in 1998, when it was, perhaps, entering “puberty”. When I was introduced to Linux, I was interested in learning about it. In those days, Linux was harder to use and if you didn't have a love of computers you might have given up. Linux has come a long way since then. Since I wanted more control of my system, I was interested in Gentoo.

Gentoo Linux 2008.0

Filed under
Gentoo

phoronix.com: In recent times the Gentoo Linux and its foundation has been plagued with a multitude of problems and times have certainly been challenging for this once popular distribution. It's already July and we are now finally seeing Gentoo's first official release of the year.

Gentoo Linux 2008.0 released

Filed under
Gentoo

The 2008.0 final release is out! Code-named "It's got what plants crave," this release contains numerous new features including an updated installer, improved hardware support, a complete rework of profiles, and a move to Xfce instead of GNOME on the LiveCD.

Also: New council elected

Gentoo (or Finding Linux Nirvana)

Filed under
Gentoo

pc-eye.blogspot: I have been making some fairly significant changes to my forensic boxes by replacing Debian Etch and Ubuntu 7.10 respectively with Gentoo 2008.0 (still in beta at the moment but apparently stable).

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 30 June 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

The June issue of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter has been released. In this month's issue: LinuxTag and FliSoL, GSOC interview, Gentoo in space, and more!

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.