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Gentoo

Kernel and Graphics: Gentoo Removes Hardened Linux, Linux 4.14 Changes and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gentoo

A Look at Gentoo based distribution Sabayon

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Gentoo

Sabayon is a binary based distribution based on the source based distribution Gentoo. In English that means that the developers of Sabayon built a distribution off of Gentoo that no longer has a primary focus of building packages strictly from source, but rather, has it’s own repositories of packages that have been precompiled and are available for download through a new package manager they call Entropy; so even users who are new to GNU/Linux can use Sabayon without the steep learning curve of Gentoo.

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Review: Calculate Linux 17.6 KDE

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Gentoo
Reviews

Calculate Linux is a Gentoo-based distribution. The project's slogan is "Easy Linux from the source," which refers to the fact that Calculate is relatively easy to use but still benefits from Gentoo's powerful and flexible source-based Portage package manager.

Calculate recently celebrated its tenth birthday and released Calculate Linux 17.6. The distro comes in four flavours; apart from a desktop and server edition there's Calculate Scratch ("for those who want to build a customized system that works for them") and Calculate Media Center ("for your home multimedia center"). Each version is available for the x86_64 and i686 architectures and uses SysV init rather than systemd. The desktop edition has ISOs for the KDE, Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce desktop environments - GNOME is presumably not available because of its dependency on systemd. I opted for the 64-bit KDE version, which is just over 2GB in size.

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Alpine Linux is an OS at a new peak of binary packaging

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Gentoo

The Alpine Linux distribution is described as ‘minimal’ and best suited for ‘power users’.

Originally created by Gentoo, the project is now wholly independent and, as such, it is self-hosting.

Gentoo Linux is another distribution… but built the Portage package management system. This project is essentially a security-oriented lightweight Linux distribution based on musl libc and Busybox.

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Gentoo Linux Is Dropping SPARC as a Security Supported Hardware Architecture

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Gentoo

Gentoo's Yury German is informing the community of the Linux-based operating system via a mailing list announcement that the Gentoo security team will no longer support the SPARC architecture.

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Distributions News: MX-16.1, Clonezilla, Porteus Kiosk 4.4.0, and openSUSE Tumbleweed

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Gentoo
Debian
SUSE
  • Debian-Based antiX MX-16.1 Distro Introduces Experimental Encrypted Home Folders

    The development team behind the Debian-based antiX MX GNU/Linux distribution announced the immediate availability for download of the first point release of the antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" series.

    The antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" operating system series launched last year in mid-December based on the Debian GNU/Linux 8.6 "Jessie" distribution, but without the systemd init system. This release defaults to sysVinit init system, and it's using a highly customized, lightweight Xfce 4.12.2 desktop environment.

  • Clonezilla Live - Clone Your Hard Drive Easily

    ​We all of us have the hard disk that stores our heart pictures, videos, famous games, Eminem songs and many things. Most of all hard disk serves us a way to store orcreate a backup. But what are you going to do if just want the exact clone of your hard disks? How are you going to unhide all hidden files? What if your computer goes dead and you want to backup everything before going for hard way repair? This is time Clonezilla comes in the game.

  • Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.4.0 OS Debuts with Chrome 58 and Firefox 52.1.2 ESR

    Porteus Solutions' Tomasz Jokiel is pleased to announce the release of a new maintenance update for the Gentoo-based Porteus Kiosk operating system designed for deployment on public access computers.

    Powered by a kernel from the long-term supported Linux 4.9 branch, specifically version 4.9.30, Porteus Kiosk 4.4.0 launches two and a half months after the previous point release in the 4.x series of the kiosk operating system with the Google Chrome 58.0.3029.110 and Mozilla Firefox 52.1.2 ESR web browsers.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Switches Over To GCC 7

Gentoo-Based exGENT Live 2017 Distro Has Xfce 4.12.1 and LXQt 0.11.0, Linux 4.10

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Gentoo

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton announced the release of yet another build of his Gentoo-based exGENT Live Linux distribution, using the lightweight Xfce and LXQt desktop environments.

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Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.3 OS Ships with Kernel 4.9.14, X.Org Server 1.19.2

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Gentoo

Today, March 13, 2017, Tomasz Jokiel from Porteus Solutions was proud to announce the release and immediate availability for download of the Gentoo-based Porteus Kiosk 4.3 operating system.

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Gentoo-Based exGENT Linux Distro Gets the "Best Version Ever," Says Developer

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Gentoo

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton announced today, March 9, 2017, the immediate availability of a new build of his Gentoo-based exGENT Linux distribution, which the developer dubbed as the best version ever.

exGENT Build 170309 is now available for those who want to install a Gentoo-based distro in less than 10 minutes. It uses the lightweight Xfce 4.12.1 desktop environment by default and the Linux 4.9.12 kernel. The OS is distributed as a Live DVD designed to run only on 64-bit architectures.

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Chromebooks Are Spreading

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GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google
  • Best Chromebooks for business 2017: Should I buy a Chromebook? Chromebook buying advice

    Instead of running Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X, Chromebooks support Google's Chrome operating system (OS), meaning that these machines are entirely internet and cloud-based.

    Good for those familiar with the Chrome web browser and the Google productivity suite (Docs, Sheets, Slides), not so good for those wanting to perform heavy duty tasks with external applications.

    But keep an open mind, if you're looking for a cheap laptop to perform internet-based tasks, such as emails or web browsing, the Chromebook could be a viable option or a great option for a second machine.

    Read on to find out the best Chromebooks for business...

  • Apple’s Devices Lose Luster in American Classrooms

    Apple is losing its grip on American classrooms, which technology companies have long used to hook students on their brands for life.

    Over the last three years, Apple’s iPads and Mac notebooks — which accounted for about half of the mobile devices shipped to schools in the United States in 2013 — have steadily lost ground to Chromebooks, inexpensive laptops that run on Google’s Chrome operating system and are produced by Samsung, Acer and other computer makers.

  • Apple Losing Out to Microsoft and Google in U.S. Classrooms [iophk: "weird-ass spin there in the title. Apple is really losing to Google, Microsoft is treading water instead."]

    According to research company Futuresource Consulting, in 2016 the number of devices in American classrooms that run iOS and macOS fell to third place behind both Google-powered laptops and Windows devices.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: KVM Forum 2019 and "Bar Charts for Diversity"

  • A recap of KVM Forum 2019

    The 13th KVM Forum virtualization conference took place in Lyon, France in October 2019. One might think that development may have finished on the Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) module that was merged in Linux 2.6.20 in 2007, but this year's conference underscored the amount of work still being done, particularly on side-channel attack mitigation, I/O device assignment with VFIO and mdev, footprint reduction with micro virtual machines (VMs), and with the ability to run VMs nested within VMs. Many talks also involved the virtual machine monitor (VMM) user-space programs that use the KVM kernel module—of which QEMU is the most widely used.

  • Enhancing KVM for guest protection and security

    A key tenet in KVM is to reuse as much Linux infrastructure as possible and focus specifically on processor virtualization. Back in 2007, this meant a smaller code base and less friction with the other kernel subsystems, especially when compared with other virtualization technologies such as Xen. This led to KVM being merged into the mainline with relative ease. But now, in the era of microarchitectural vulnerabilities, the priorities have shifted, and the KVM's reliance on other kernel subsystems can be a liability. For one thing, the host kernel widens the TCB (Trusted Computing Base) and makes for a larger attack surface. In addition, kernel data structures such as the direct memory map give Linux access to guest memory even when it is not strictly necessary and make it impossible to fully enforce the principle of least privilege. In his talk "Enhancing KVM for Guest Protection and Security" (slides [PDF]) presented at KVM Forum 2019, long-time KVM contributor Jun Nakajima explained this risk and suggested some strategies to mitigate it.

  • Bar charts for diversity

    At the Linux App Summit I gave an unconference talk titles Hey guys, this conference is for everyone. The “hey guys” part refers to excluding people from a talk or making them feel uncomfortable – you can do this unintentionally, and the take-away of the talk was that you, (yes, you) can be better. I illustrated this mostly with conversational distance, a favorite topic of mine that I can demonstrate easily on stage. There’s a lot of diversity in how far people stand away from strangers, while explaining something they care about. The talk wasn’t recorded, but I’ve put the slides up. Another side of diversity can be dealt with by statistics. Since I’m a mathematician, I have a big jar of peanuts and raisins in the kitchen. Late at night I head down to the kitchen and grab ten items from the jar. Darn, all of them are raisins. What are the odds!? Well, a lot depends on whether there are any peanuts in the jar at all; what percentage is peanuts; whether I’m actually picking things randomly or not. There’s a convenient tool that Katarina Behrens pointed me to, which can help figure this out. Even if there’s only a tiny fraction of peanuts in the jar, there’s an appreciable chance of getting one (e.g. change the percentage on that page to 5% and you’ll see).

Linux on the MAG1 8.9 inch mini-laptop (Ubuntu and Fedora)

The Magic Ben MAG1 mini-laptop is a 1.5 pound notebook computer that measures about 8.2″ x 5.8″ x 0.7″ and which features an 8.9 inch touchscreen display and an Intel Core m3-8100Y processor. As I noted in my MAG1 review, the little computer also has one of the best keyboards I’ve used on a laptop this small and a tiny, but responsive trackpad below the backlit keyboard. Available from GeekBuying for $630 and up, the MAG1 ships with Windows 10, but it’s also one of the most Linux-friendly mini-laptops I’ve tested to date. [...] I did not install either operating system to local storage, so I cannot comment on sleep, battery life, fingerprint authentication, or other features that you’d only be able to truly test by fully installing Ubuntu, Fedora, or another GNU/Linux-based operating system. But running from a liveUSB is a good way to kick the tires and see if there are any obvious pain points before installing an operating system, and for the most part the two operating systems I tested look good to go. Booting from a flash drive is also pretty easy. Once you’ve prepared a bootable drive using Rufus, UNetbootin, or a similar tool, just plug it into the computer’s USB port, hit the Esc key during startup to bring up the UEFI/SETUP utility. Read more Also: Top 10 technical skills that will get you hired in 2020

Android Leftovers

An Extensive Look At The AMD Naples vs. Rome Power Efficiency / Performance-Per-Watt

Since the AMD EPYC 7002 "Rome" series launch in August we have continue to be captivated by the raw performance of AMD's Zen 2 server processors across many different workloads as covered now in countless articles. The performance-per-dollar / TCO is also extremely competitive against Intel's Xeon Scalable line-up, but how is the power efficiency of these 7nm EPYC processors? We waited to deliver those numbers until having a retail Rome board for carrying out those tests and now after that and then several weeks of benchmarking, here is an extensive exploration of the AMD EPYC 7002 series power efficiency as well as a look at the peak clock frequencies being achieved in various workloads to also provide some performance-per-clock metrics compared to Naples. Read more