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Gentoo

Redcore Linux Makes Gentoo Easy

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

Raise your hand if you’ve always wanted to try Gentoo Linux but never did because you didn’t have either the time or the skills to invest in such a challenging installation. I’m sure there are plenty of Linux users out there not willing to admit this, but it’s okay, really; installing Gentoo is a challenge, and it can be very time consuming. In the end, however, installing Gentoo will result in a very personalized Linux desktop that offers the fulfillment of saying, “I did it!”

So, what’s a curious Linux user to do, when they want to experience this elite distribution? One option is to turn to the likes of Redcore Linux. Redcore does what many have tried (and few have succeeded in doing) in bringing Gentoo to the masses. In fact, Sabayon Linux is the only other distro I can think of that’s truly succeeded in bringing a level of simplicity to Gentoo Linux that many users can enjoy. And while Sabayon is still very much in active development, it’s good to know there are others attempting what might have once been deemed impossible.

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[Old] Distributions are becoming irrelevant: difference was our strength and our liability

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

For someone that has spent the past thirteen years defining himself as a developer of a Linux distribution (whether I really am still a Gentoo Linux developer or not is up for debate I’m sure), having to write a title like this is obviously hard. But from the day I started working on open source software to now I have grown a lot, and I have realized I have been wrong about many things in the past.

One thing that I realized recently is that nowadays, distributions lost the war. As the title of this post says, difference is our strength, but at the same time, it is also the seed of our ruin. Take distributions: Gentoo, Fedora, Debian, SuSE, Archlinux, Ubuntu. They all look and act differently, focusing on different target users, and because of this they differ significantly in which software they make available, which versions are made available, and how much effort is spent on testing, both the package itself and the system integration.

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Review: Sabayon and Antergos

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Gentoo
Reviews

Sabayon is a Gentoo-based distribution which is available in many desktop editions as well as a server edition. Sabayon strives to provide a working system out-of-the-box, saving the user a lot of time when it comes to configuring the operating system. Sabayon provides several categories of installation media. The project uses a rolling release model and the distribution's many editions are provided in Stable, Monthly and Daily snapshots. It has been about a year since the last Stable set of installation media was produced and so I decided to explore one of the monthly snapshots.

I began with the MATE edition of Sabayon's Monthly snapshot, a 2GB download which I confirmed downloaded properly using the distribution's checksums. Booting from the live media brought up a menu asking if we would like to start a live desktop environment, launch a text-based installer, start in safe mode or launch a live text console. I was surprised when taking the live desktop option booted the distribution to a text console and showed me a login prompt.

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SystemRescueCd

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

If you accidentally delete data or format a disk, good advice can be expensive. Or maybe not: You can undo many data losses with SystemRescueCd.

The price for mass storage devices of all types has been falling steadily in recent years, with a simultaneous increase in capacity. As a result, users are storing more and more data on local storage media – often without worrying about backing it up. Once the milk has been spilled, the anxious search begins for important photos, videos, correspondence, and spreadsheets. SystemRescueCd can help in these cases by providing a comprehensive toolbox for every computer, with the possibility of restoring lost items.

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Calculate Linux 17.12.2 released

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Gentoo

We are pleased to announce the release of Calculate Linux 17.12.2, based on Gentoo 17.0. Therefore, the whole of the packages were rebuilt and some fixes done.

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Gentoo-Based Calculate Linux 17.12 New Year's Eve Release Adds SoftRaid Support

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Gentoo

Coming six months after version 17.6, Calculate Linux 17.12 introduces some new features and improvements like SoftRaid support, better automatic partitioning of drives, support for third-party overlays, better application task scheduling with the MuQSS kernel patch, as well as less memory load with the UKSM kernel patch.

Under the hood, Calculate Linux 17.12 is powered by the latest Linux 4.14 LTS (Long Term Support) kernel and X.Org Server 1.19.5 display server, uses a PAE binary kernel for 32-bit computes, updates GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) to version 6.4, optimizes all server kernel settings, and it launches Calculate Utilities server through D-Bus instead of running in the background, for better performance.

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Calculate Linux 17.12 released

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Gentoo

On the New Year's Eve, meet Calculate Linux 17.12! This latest release features installation on software RAID and offers still better load and memory balance.

Eight flavors are now available for download: Calculate Linux Desktop supplied with the KDE (CLD), Cinnamon (CLDC), Mate (CLDM) or else Xfce (CLDX) environment, Calculate Directory Server (CDS), Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS), Calculate Scratch Server (CSS) an Calculate Container Scratch (CCS).

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Elivepatch Aims To Make Live Kernel Patching Easier On Gentoo

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Gentoo

Elivepatch is a new means of live kernel patching of Gentoo Linux and works in a distributed manner.

Elivepatch offers distributed live patch building via a client/server model and allows for automatic live patching of Linux kernel CVEs and allows for incremental live patching.

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Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.5 Debuts with EAPoL Support, Linux Kernel 4.12

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

Tomasz Jokiel from Porteus Solutions announced the release of the Gentoo-based Porteus Kiosk 4.5 operating system designed for web terminals, which brings numerous improvements, updated components, and new functionality.

First and foremost, Porteus Kiosk 4.5.0 bumps the Linux kernel version from the long-term supported Linux 4.9 series, which was used in the previous release, to the Linux 4.12 branch, shipping with Linux kernel 4.12.10 by default, thus adding an extra layer of hardware support to the free and open-source kiosk operating system for public access computers.

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Gentoo-Based Chrome OS for Work, Gentoo Sources Change

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google
  • Introducing Chrome Enterprise

    Since we launched Chrome OS in 2009, our goal has been to build the simplest, fastest, and most secure operating system possible. And we’ve been inspired by all the ways we’ve seen businesses embrace Chrome, from Chromebooks in the office, to shared Chrome devices in the field, to signage and kiosks for customer engagement in retail. But with so many different business needs—not to mention so many different devices—companies have also told us they want a single, cost-effective solution that gives them the flexibility and control to keep their employees connected. That’s why today we’re announcing Chrome Enterprise.

  • Google Rolls Out Chrome Enterprise: Chrome OS For Work

    Google has today announced Chrome Enterprise as a subscription service to take Chrome OS and Chromebooks into more work environments.

    Chrome Enterprise makes Chrome OS more friendly for professional work environments and lets IT/administrators manage Chrome extensions, printers, handle operating system updates, and provides other features like single sign-on support and more. Chrome Enterprise costs $50 USD per device per year and includes 24/7 enterprise support.

  • Switch to Gentoo sources

    You've might already read it on the Gentoo news site, the Hardened Linux kernel sources are removed from the tree due to the grsecurity change where the grsecurity Linux kernel patches are no longer provided for free. The decision was made due to supportability and maintainability reasons.

    That doesn't mean that users who want to stick with the grsecurity related hardening features are left alone. Agostino Sarubbo has started providing sys-kernel/grsecurity-sources for the users who want to stick with it, as it is based on minipli's unofficial patchset. I seriously hope that the patchset will continue to be maintained and, who knows, even evolve further.

    Personally though, I'm switching to the Gentoo sources, and stick with SELinux as one of the protection measures. And with that, I might even start using my NVidia graphics card a bit more, as that one hasn't been touched in several years (I have an Optimus-capable setup with both an Intel integrated graphics card and an NVidia one, but all attempts to use nouveau for the one game I like to play - minecraft - didn't work out that well).

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Stable kernels 4.16.5 and 4.14.37

today's leftovers

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    Kubernetes startup Heptio has added another project to its roster of open-source efforts that provide expanded capabilities for container orchestration users.
  • Heptio Launches Kubernetes Load Balancing Application
  • The Role of Site Reliability Engineering in Microservices
    You can always spot the hot jobs in technology: they’re the ones that didn’t exist 10 years ago. While Site Reliability Engineers (SREs) did definitely exist a decade ago, they were mostly inside Google and a handful of other Valley innovators. Today, however, the SRE role exists everywhere, from Uber to Goldman Sachs, everyone is now in the business of keeping their sites online and stable. While SREs are hotshots in the industry, their role in a microservices environment is not just a natural fit that goes hand-in-hand, like peanut butter and jelly. Instead, while SREs and microservices evolved in parallel inside the world’s software companies, the former actually makes life far more difficult for the latter.
  • Lying with statistics, distributions, and popularity contests on Cooking With Linux (without a net)
    It's Tuesday and that means it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net), sponsored and supported by Linux Journal. Today, I'm courting controversy by discussing numbers, OS popularity, and how to pick the right Linux distribution if you want to be where are the beautiful people hang out. And yes, I'll do it all live, without a net, and with a high probability of falling flat on my face.
  • Voyage open sources its approach to autonomous vehicle safety
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  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to KubeCon Europe
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  • Event - "GNU Health Con 2018" (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain)
    GNU Health is this year holding the III International GNU Health Conference, GNU Health Con 2018. This conference will gather the community of activists and developers who have been working on the project during the past 10 years.
  • ONNX: the Open Neural Network Exchange Format
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  • L.A. Lawmakers Looking To Take Legal Action Against Google For Not Solving Long-Running City Traffic Problems
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