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Gentoo

Gentoo KDE3 Deprecation Notice

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Gentoo

gentoo.org: After multiple setbacks we have finally managed to stabilise KDE4 on both major desktop architectures (amd64 and x86), with other teams to follow. The KDE3 support is being deprecated with immediate effect.

Experiencing Sabayon 5, oh!

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Linux
Gentoo

linuxforu.com: Sabayon’s strength has always been to showcase the power of FOSS on the desktop. Once upon a time, it used to come preinstalled with Linux-compatible games. But the current releases have done away with the idea of showcasing the games factor and concentrate on giving an out-of-the box desktop experience.

Gentoo Optimizations Benchmarked

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Gentoo

linux-mag.com: All binary distributions make these choices for you, but building from source, Gentoo users can decide for themselves. They are able to choose what CPU their binaries will be built for, as well as GCC optimizations.

The Future of Funtoo - Funtooture

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Gentoo

sanaris.livejournal: As the title states, I've been thinking about the future of Funtoo and wanted to post some of my ideas here, so you can offer feedback. These ideas are pretty complex so take some time to reflect on them.

Thoughts from 6-month-old Gentoo user

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Gentoo

fedoratux.blogspot: I am a six-month-old Gentoo user now! Six month ago, I posted about being a newbie of Gentoo. Now I could say I am happy with my decision of switching from Fedora. Please note that Fedora is a great distribution, I personally think Fedora is better than most of distributions—Ubuntu included.

Gentoo: “We're Not Dead”

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Gentoo
Interviews

linux-mag.com: In 2008 the Gentoo Foundation ceased to exist, sending rumors of Gentoo’s demise and ultimate death circulating around the Internet. Almost two years on, the distro is still here and celebrating its 10th anniversary. How close did the distro come to disaster, and where does it stand now?

The problem with Gentoo: my reactions

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Gentoo

thelinuxexperiment.com: One of the articles Tyler passed me this morning was a brief post on three problems with Gentoo by Dion Moult. There are a few things he’s mentioned that I definitely agree with. Having used the distribution for a little over a month, some minor changes would go a long way to making the experience less painful and more usable.

F.B.I. Forensic Field Kit

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Gentoo
Software

ddlhere.com: This is the ultimate bootable Disk for power user, or wannabe agent. Basically, the FBI Forensic Field Kit is a AIO Toolkit with compiled applications and ebooks designed to investigate and coordinate the user to look for buried files, and information logged inside your computers hard drive.

Gentoo release statistics

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Gentoo

robbat2.livejournal: solar was asking about release statistics, so I grabbed the current data from Bouncer.

The problem with Gentoo

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Gentoo

thinkmoult.com: Compared to most geeks I am rather illiterate, but nevertheless there are a couple areas where this tradeoff shouldn’t occur:

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Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

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