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Announcing Mageia 7 Beta 3

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MDV

Everyone at Mageia is very happy to get the final beta release before Mageia 7 out for testing! We all hope that this release builds on the quality of the previous two beta releases and that with the extra tests from the community will put Mageia 7 in a good place for the coming release candidate.

There is still lots to be done before the final release, and the more tests that we can get, the better. There have been large updates to Qt and Plasma, as well as some other key components since beta 2, with the new artwork for Mageia 7 almost ready for integration too.

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Also: Mageia 7 Beta 3 Arrives With KDE Plasma 5.15.4 + Linux 5.0

OpenMandriva Appears To Be Experimenting With Profile Guided Optimizations

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MDV

OpenMandriva has been toying with some performance optimizations in recent times like preferring the LLVM Clang compiler over GCC, spinning an AMD Zen "znver1" optimized version of the OS/packages, and apparently now exploring possible Profile Guided Optimizations.

Profile Guided Optimizations (PGO) basically involve feeding the feedback of profiling data back into the compiler so it can better optimize the generated code based upon actual usage behavior of the software under test. PGO can pay off big time depending upon the code-base and how well the profile data models real-world workflows of the said software in question.

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New Mageia 7 Artwork

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MDV

As many will have no doubt noticed, there has been an artwork contest running for Mageia 7, and then lots of voting in the community to choose the artwork! This has all finally concluded and we will start to integrate the new artwork into Mageia 7 to get it ready for release.

Before we get to the new artwork, firstly, a huge thank you to everyone that submitting artwork, and also those that took part in all of the voting, there was a great turnout and the results were really close, an indication of the excellence of the work that our community has put forward.

Firstly, the screensavers for Mageia 7 were, as always a tour around the world and showed some excellent photography talent. There seemed to be a distinct liking for rivers this time around.

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Gaël Duval: From Sovereign operating systems to the Sovereign digital chain

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Android
MDV

Several years ago I read about some intiatives to build a “Sovereign operating system”. Quickly I realized that, at the age of Internet, it was a depecrated idea and a total non-sense, and instead I started to talk about the idea of the “Sovereign digital chain”.

I developed the concept in a chapter of this book “Reflections on Programming Systems” that was published in 2019 at Springer.

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Mageia 7 beta 2 is out!

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MDV

We are very proud to announce that Mageia 7 beta 2 is available for everyone to download!
This new beta comes with lots of bugfixes and updates, and it is one of our best beta releases.

Of course, there is still a lot of work to come before Mageia 7 is ready: a big Qt and Plasma update (5.15), a Gnome update (3.32 as soon it is released), and more checks on 32-bit hardware as well as the artwork for Mageia 7. For that, we will have a beta 3 set of images. We are all looking forward to implementing these changes and getting all of the rough edges polished out with all of the help from the community.

This release includes the Classical Installer as well as the Live Images, with the standard lineup of architectures and Desktop Environments – 32 and 64-bit Classical Installers; 64-bit Plasma, GNOME and Xfce Live DVD’s and a 32 bit Xfce Live DVD.

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A promise for the best until OpenMandriva does better: OMLx 4.0 Beta

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MDV

Our first release in 2019 is OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Beta, a close preview of the upcoming final release.
Since Alpha1, OMLx 4.0 got a huge number of fixes and improvements.
You may already be aware of some of them having read OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Alpha1 follow-up, some more came afterwards.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Beta Brings Installer Improvements, Dnfdragora GUI Package Manager

Mageia 7 Artwork Voting

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MDV

The artwork contest is now closed, firstly, all of the people that gave their time to make and submit so many excellent pieces deserve our thanks, it is really appreciated, they will make Mageia 7 look excellent.

So now we need to start voting on which of these images we want to have included, primarily for the signature background, but also as additional background and screensavers.

As we have so many images to choose, there are two votes, one for the background and one for the screensavers, in both cases you can choose up to 20 images that you like, to vote, just put an “x” in a new column next to the image you want.

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We proudly introduce you OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 major release Alpha1

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MDV

Some time passed after our latest public release OMLx 3.03 though we have been very active since then.
Today we are proud to introduce you to OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 major release Alpha1.
Big changes happened, such as we switched to RPMv4, and dnf as software package manager. We have had massive updates in the core system, and rebuilt everything with clang 7.0, giving you a significant speed increase.
OMLx 4.0 now includes complete ports to aarch64 and armv7hnl platforms and has started a port to RISC-V. We have also built a version specifically for current AMD processors (Ryzen, ThreadRipper, EPYC) that outperforms the generic version by taking advantage of new features in those processors.
aarch64 builds are currently available for Raspberry Pi and DragonBoard 410c - given the hardware is not very widespread in our QA team, we are specifically looking for people to help test (and ideally fix bugs in) those versions.
We would also be interested in hearing what other aarch64 and armv7hnl devices you would like to see supported.
The RISC-V port is still in early stages and will not be released as part of 4.0.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Alpha 1 Ships With RPM4, DNF, AMD Zen Optimizations

Mageia 7 Beta Finally Rolls Along For Testing

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MDV

It's been a year and a half since the release of Mageia 6 while finally the Mageia 7 beta images have surfaced.

The Mageia 7 Beta is shipping with the KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, is running on the fresh Linux 4.19 kernel, provides the Mesa 18.3 3D drivers, and has a wealth of package updates compared to the state shipped by Mageia 6. Mageia 7 also offers reworked ARM support (including initial AArch64 enablement), DNF as an alternative to URPMI, and a variety of other updates. The in-progress release notes cover some of the other Mageia 7 changes.

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It’s Artwork Time – Mageia 7 Artwork Contest is Open

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MDV

As with every release, the artwork for Mageia 7 comes from you, the great community that supports and makes Mageia possible. It’s time to start the process of getting Mageia 7 ready for release, updating all of the artwork and designs that will make it look great and unique. As in previous years, we’re looking for your contributions and ideas, but not just images and photos – if you have icons and logos, or ideas on how login screens or animations should look, then it’s time to discuss or show them off.

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Nebra Anybeam turns your Raspberry Pi into a pocket home cinema projector

TVs are available to buy in truly huge sizes these days, and with 4K (and upwards) resolution, movies and TV shows really come to life. But there’s something even more magical about watching a film projected onto a screen or a wall. With the right setup, it can be like having a cinema in your home. You don’t necessarily need to spend a fortune on a projector though. Nebra Anybeam can turn your Raspberry Pi into a cinema projector that you can slip into your pocket and take anywhere. Read more Also: Nebra AnyBeam - world's smallest pocket cinema projectors

Back in the Day: UNIX, Minix and Linux

I don't remember my UCSD email address, but some years later, I was part of the admin team on the major UUCP hub hplabs, and my email address was simply hplabs!taylor. Somewhere along the way, networking leaped forward with TCP/IP (we had TCP/IP "Bake Offs" to test interoperability). Once we had many-to-many connectivity, it was clear that the "bang" notation was unusable and unnecessarily complicated. We didn't want to worry about routing, just destination. Enter the "@" sign. I became taylor@hplabs.com. Meanwhile, UNIX kept growing, and the X Window System from MIT gained popularity as a UI layer atop the UNIX command line. In fact, X is a public domain implementation of the windowing system my colleagues and I first saw at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. PARC had computers where multiple programs were on the screen simultaneously in "windows", and there was a pointer device used to control them—so cool. Doug Englebart was inspired too; he went back to Stanford Research Institute and invented the mouse to make control of those windows easier. At Apple, they also saw what was being created at PARC and were inspired to create the Macintosh with all its windowing goodness. Still, who doesn't love the command line, as Ritchie and Kernighan had originally designed it in the early days of UNIX? (UNIX, by the way, is a wordplay on a prior multiuser operating system called Multics, but that's another story.) Read more

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