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MDV

OpenMandriva Has Been Working On Their RISC-V & AArch64 Ports

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MDV

In addition to working on OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 as this distribution's next major release with its roots tracing back to the legendary Mandrake, its developers have also been working on clean ports of this Linux distribution to other CPU architectures.

OpenMandriva has been working on expanding its focus from just Intel x86_64 to a good experience for AMD Ryzen AMD64 and ports to AArch64 and RISC-V too. They are doing since as "other CPU architectures are starting to be fast enough" for desktop/laptop use-cases and "monopolies are harmful."

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It is with great pleasure that we announce the release of Mageia 6.1

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MDV

This release brings all of the updates and development that has gone into Mageia 6 together into fresh installation media, giving users a kernel that supports hardware released after Mageia 6. The new installations will benefit from the countless updates that current fully updated Mageia systems will have, allowing new installations to avoid the need for a large update post install. So if you are currently running an up to date Mageia 6 system, there is no need to reinstall Mageia 6.1 as you will already be running the same packages.

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Alpha Surfaces

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MDV

We've been looking forward to the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 release for a number of months now with Lx 3.0 having debuted two years ago. Fortunately, that release is inching closer to release as this week the alpha release is now available for testing.

OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 is a big release and as such is taking a long time to get into shape for release. Some of the big ticket items include switching back from RPM5 to RPM4, utilizing Fedora's DNF package manager, shipping with Linux 4.17~4.18 , LLVM Clang 7 as the default compiler while GCC 8 is also available , complete support for AArch64, and a variety of package updates.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3 Updates

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MDV
  • Major updated packages for Lx 3

    Good news for OpenMandriva Lx 3 users. While OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 in on the way, we keep taking care of OMLx 3.03. Developers crisb, itchka, and TPG have made available a long list of updated packages just released to our updates repositories after the normal testing.

    Updated packages include Firefox 61.0.1, Thunderbird 52.9.0, Plasma 5.12.6, Quassel 0.12.5, Qt5 5.9.6, Libre Office 6.0.5, Mesa 18.1.3 and number of other updated KDE packages.

  • While Waiting for OpenMandriva Lx 4, OpenMandriva Lx 3 Users Get Lots of Updates

    While waiting for the forthcoming OpenMandriva Lx 4 operating system series, users of the current OpenMandriva Lx 3 release have received numerous updated packages.

    The OpenMandriva development team announced over the weekend that a long list of updated packages await users of the OpenMandriva Lx 3 operating system series, which include the recently released KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS desktop environment and Mozilla Firefox 61.0.1 web browser.

    "Good news for OpenMandriva Lx 3 users. While OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 in on the way, we keep taking care of OMLx 3.03. Developers crisb, itchka, and TPG have made available a long list of updated packages just released to our updates repositories after the normal testing," reads the announcement.

OpenMandriva Lx 4 Launching Soon with KDE Plasma 5.13, GCC 8.1, and Linux 4.18

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MDV

The team announced some of the upcoming features that users should expect from the final OpenMandriva Lx 4 release, which should be launched sometime this summer or early this fall. Being a KDE-oriented distro, OpenMandriva Lx 4 will feature the latest KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment by default.

Of course, it will ship with the most recent point release of the KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, which will be accompanied by the latest KDE Applications 18.04.3 software suite, due for release on July 12, 2018, as well as the KDE Frameworks 5.48.0 software suite, which is expected to land at the end of next, probably on July 14.

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Meet the Frenchman masterminding a Google-free Android

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Android
Interviews
MDV

Open source had a moral purpose when it was fighting "The Borg", Microsoft, in the 1990s, but then it fell from view. You could say it has found its mojo again, only this time it is about loosening the grip of companies built on ever more intrusive personal data processing: Google and Facebook. One of the biggest but most promising challenges is creating an Android free of Google's data-slurping.

Four years ago there were four mobile platforms, but since Microsoft and BlackBerry withdrew, it's a duopoly of Apple and Google.

The creation of a new third platform – a Google-free Android – now looks feasible, given the Great Unbundling the European Commission is likely to order. But someone has to build the damn thing – and it's going to be a mammoth task.

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Announcing “e Foundation” for eelo

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Android
MDV

I’m pleased to announce that a non-profit organization has been incorporated to support the project: e Foundation.

“e Foundation” will host core eelo assets and fuel the development of eelo software.

This non-profit organization will be able to receive private and public grants, as well as donations from individuals, from anywhere in the world. We’re also working to add a legal way so that donations could benefit from tax cuts, as it’s often possible when donating to “in the public interest” organizations.

As soon as a bank account will be ready for “e Foundation”, we will move there all donations and our “in demand” crowdfunding campaign.

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 on the Way and Fedora's Future Plans

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Red Hat
MDV
  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Being Prepared With zSTD-Enabled Linux 4.16, Clang Pre-7.0, GCC 8

    OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 is being prepped for release soon. As covered previously, they are switching back from RPM5 to RPM4. In addition, they are picking up DNF package manager support over URPMI for package installation.

    Other work going into OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 includes a pre-7.0 snapshot of LLVM Clang, the GCC 8 code compiler that was newly released, and more. OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 is currently tracking the Linux 4.16 kernel and do have zSTD compression support enabled.

    While OpenMandriva talked about dropping 32-bit support, as of now i686 continues to be supported alongside x86_64, ARMv7, and AArch64.

  • Fedora 30 Should Be Out In Just Under One Year

    Fedora 28 was released this week and it actually arrived on-time with its great feature-set. In planning ahead, Fedora's FESCo committee has already proposed an initial schedule for Fedora 30 that will arrive at this time next year.

    Fedora 29's schedule has already been set for having a beta release by mid-to-end of September, a final freeze in October, and getting the official release out by the end of October -- assuming no delays.

  • Weekend Reading: Qubes

    Qubes OS is a security-focused operating system that, as tech editor Kyle Rankin puts it, "is fundamentally different from any other Linux desktop I've used". Join us this weekend in reading Kyle's multi-part series on all things Qubes.

The Enormous Mageia 6 Update

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MDV

Watch this space, we said – well, your patience is soon to be rewarded!

Releasing the Mageia 6 updates for QT5, KF5, Plasma, KDE and LXQt has just been approved. There will be well over 500 packages in total!

To help reduce the chance of users trying to install the updates from a mirror that hasn’t been fully updated, the hdlist generation will be held for 24 hours after the updates are pushed from updates testing to the updates repository. This should help ensure that the mirrors are fully synced before the hdlist generation is turned back on, and the updates are actually made available for users to install from the normal updates repository.

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Also: A Big Batch Of Mageia 6 Updates Are Coming

Red Hat: Decision Manager 7, Podcasts, Fedora 27, and RPM

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Red Hat
MDV
  • Red Hat Beefs Up Low-Code Offerings for Enterprises

    Red Hat, a provider of enterprise open source solutions, has introduced a decision management platform and low-code development tool intended to simplify the development and deployment of rules-based applications and services. Red Hat Decision Manager 7 is the next generation of the company’s business rules management offering, Red Hat JBoss BRMS, and is designed to enable organizations to quickly build applications that automate business decisions.

    “The notion of low-code development is less about eliminating code or cutting traditional programmers out of the application development process, and more about helping business and IT users to do what they need to do quickly and efficiently, and in a complementary manner,” said Mike Piech, vice president and general manager of middleware for Red Hat. “Ultimately, what low-code tools should offer - and what we have built with Red Hat Decision Manager - is not a platform geared toward one or the other, but rather a rich and tightly integrated feature set designed to provide a better user experience regardless of whether you are a business analyst or hard-core developer.”

  • Stock to Watch – Red Hat Inc (NYSE: RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Hot Stock in the Spotlight
  • Champlain Investment Partners LLC Boosts Position in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Fedora Podcast 002 — Ambassadors, the face of Fedora

    The Fedora Marketing Team is continuing with the Fedora Podcast and we have a new episode out. This ongoing series will feature interviews and talks with people who make the Fedora community awesome. These folks work on new technologies found in Fedora. Or they produce the distribution itself. Some work on putting Fedora in the hands of users.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #28 – Kubernetes Roles & Personas
  • Emojis in vte

    It’s been one of those weeks when gnome-terminal and vte keep stumbling on some really weird edge cases, so it was a happy moment when I saw this on Fedora 27 Workstation.

  • OpenMandriva Switching Back From RPM5 To RPM4

    It was seven years ago that Mandriva 2011 switched to using RPM5 from RPM4, but now for the next OpenMandriva release they are transitioning back to using RPM4 and with that making use of Fedora's DNF.

  • Switching to RPMv4

    Cooker and 3.0 may be broken for upcoming days, as we need to adapt our docker builders and scripts to RPM4 and dnf.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • OpenStack regroups
    Only a few years ago, OpenStack was the hottest open-source project around, with a bustling startup ecosystem to boot. The project, which gives enterprises the tools to run the equivalent of AWS in their own private data centers, ran into trouble as it tried to tackle too many individual projects at the same time and enterprises took longer than expected to adopt it. That meant many a startup floundered or was acquired before it was able to gain traction while the nonprofit foundation that manages the project started to scale back its big tent approach and refocused on its core services.
  • SD Times news digest: Docker and MuleSoft’s partnership, ActiveState’s open-source language automation category, and Instana’s automatic Python instrumentation
    Docker and MuleSoft have announced a new partnership to modernize applications and accelerate digital transformation. As part of the partnership, the companies will work together to deliver new capabilities for legacy apps with APIs, legacy apps without APIs and new apps created in Docker. In addition, MuleSoft’s Anypoint platform will be combined with Docker Enterprise.
  • ActiveState Creates Open Source Language Automation Category
  • New open source cloud discovery tool arrives from Twistlock
    Cloud Discovery connects to cloud providers' native platform APIs to discover services such as container registries, managed Kubernetes platforms, and serverless services, and requires only read permissions. Other key features include:
  • Google Open-Sources "Amber" Multi-API Shader Test Framework
    The newest open-source graphics project out of Google is called Amber and it's a multi-API shader testing framework focused on capturing and communicating of shader bugs. Google's Amber tries to make it easier to capture/communicate shader bugs with a scripting-based workflow. The captured shaders can be in binary form, SPIR-V assembly, or a higher-level shading language. Amber is currently focused on supporting the Vulkan and Dawn graphics APIs.
  • Microsoft allies with Facebook on AI software [Ed: Evil likes/attracts evil. Now they can do their crimes together while blaming "AI". Longtime Microsoft propagandist Jordan Novet has decided to add the Microsoft lie (PR campaign) "Microsoft loves Linux" (in photo form) to an article that has nothing to do with Linux.]
  • Microsoft alliance with Facebook signals shift in AI approach

Android Leftovers

Security Leftovers

Devices: Adding Linux to A PDP-11, Adding GNU/Linux Software to Chrome OS, and Adding Ubuntu to Android

  • Adding Linux To A PDP-11
    The UNIBUS architecture for DEC’s PDPs and Vaxxen was a stroke of genius. If you wanted more memory in your minicomputer, just add another card. Need a drive? Plug it into the backplane. Of course, with all those weird cards, these old UNIBUS PDPs are hard to keep running. The UniBone is the solution to this problem. It puts Linux on a UNIBUS bridge, allowing this card to serve as a memory emulator, a test console, a disk emulator, or any other hardware you can think of. The key to this build is the BeagleBone, everyone’s second-favorite single board computer that has one feature the other one doesn’t: PRUs, or a programmable real-time unit, that allows you to blink a lot of pins very, very fast. We’ve seen the BeagleBone be used as Linux in a terminal, as the rest of the computer for an old PDP-10 front panel and as the front end for a PDP-11/03.
  • Chrome OS Linux apps will soon be able to access your entire Downloads folder and Google Drive
    Google is working hard to turn Chrome OS into more than just a browser, but a real, functional operating system for consumers of all kinds. Most recently, they’ve invited developers to the platform with Linux app support that enables all of their tools, including Android Studio, to work as expected. Soon, your Chrome OS and Google Drive files will be even more accessible to your Linux apps. [...] According to a new commit on the Chromium Gerrit, that’s all about to change. The commit primarily pertains to a new dialog that will be shown when sharing ‘root’ folders like My Drive or Downloads with your Chrome OS Linux apps (internally known as Crostini) container. The dialog is intended to forewarn you that sharing a root folder is a bit more serious than just sharing a sub-folder, and to be sure you know what you’re doing.
  • Samsung Note 9 and Tab S4 owners can run a full Ubuntu Desktop – Linux on Dex
    We have come a long way as an industry and if this is not one of the biggest milestones in personal computing, I don’t know what else qualifies. Over the past decade of smartphones being around, we have seen an exponential increase in the power that our smartphones pack. I mean, flagships from the past few years spot more RAM and processing power than most laptops out there, but the small form factor has always been a hindrance to the utilization of this power. I mean you can only do so much on a 5.5-inch display. Samsung has launched its “Linux on Dex” app in beta and is inviting geeks and tinkerers to register and help test and develop it. The app lets owners of specific Samsung devices “run” a full Ubuntu desktop on their device alongside Android.