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Gaël Duval: From Sovereign operating systems to the Sovereign digital chain

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Several years ago I read about some intiatives to build a “Sovereign operating system”. Quickly I realized that, at the age of Internet, it was a depecrated idea and a total non-sense, and instead I started to talk about the idea of the “Sovereign digital chain”.

I developed the concept in a chapter of this book “Reflections on Programming Systems” that was published in 2019 at Springer.

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Mageia 7 beta 2 is out!

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MDV

We are very proud to announce that Mageia 7 beta 2 is available for everyone to download!
This new beta comes with lots of bugfixes and updates, and it is one of our best beta releases.

Of course, there is still a lot of work to come before Mageia 7 is ready: a big Qt and Plasma update (5.15), a Gnome update (3.32 as soon it is released), and more checks on 32-bit hardware as well as the artwork for Mageia 7. For that, we will have a beta 3 set of images. We are all looking forward to implementing these changes and getting all of the rough edges polished out with all of the help from the community.

This release includes the Classical Installer as well as the Live Images, with the standard lineup of architectures and Desktop Environments – 32 and 64-bit Classical Installers; 64-bit Plasma, GNOME and Xfce Live DVD’s and a 32 bit Xfce Live DVD.

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A promise for the best until OpenMandriva does better: OMLx 4.0 Beta

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MDV

Our first release in 2019 is OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Beta, a close preview of the upcoming final release.
Since Alpha1, OMLx 4.0 got a huge number of fixes and improvements.
You may already be aware of some of them having read OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Alpha1 follow-up, some more came afterwards.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Beta Brings Installer Improvements, Dnfdragora GUI Package Manager

Mageia 7 Artwork Voting

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MDV

The artwork contest is now closed, firstly, all of the people that gave their time to make and submit so many excellent pieces deserve our thanks, it is really appreciated, they will make Mageia 7 look excellent.

So now we need to start voting on which of these images we want to have included, primarily for the signature background, but also as additional background and screensavers.

As we have so many images to choose, there are two votes, one for the background and one for the screensavers, in both cases you can choose up to 20 images that you like, to vote, just put an “x” in a new column next to the image you want.

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We proudly introduce you OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 major release Alpha1

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MDV

Some time passed after our latest public release OMLx 3.03 though we have been very active since then.
Today we are proud to introduce you to OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 major release Alpha1.
Big changes happened, such as we switched to RPMv4, and dnf as software package manager. We have had massive updates in the core system, and rebuilt everything with clang 7.0, giving you a significant speed increase.
OMLx 4.0 now includes complete ports to aarch64 and armv7hnl platforms and has started a port to RISC-V. We have also built a version specifically for current AMD processors (Ryzen, ThreadRipper, EPYC) that outperforms the generic version by taking advantage of new features in those processors.
aarch64 builds are currently available for Raspberry Pi and DragonBoard 410c - given the hardware is not very widespread in our QA team, we are specifically looking for people to help test (and ideally fix bugs in) those versions.
We would also be interested in hearing what other aarch64 and armv7hnl devices you would like to see supported.
The RISC-V port is still in early stages and will not be released as part of 4.0.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Alpha 1 Ships With RPM4, DNF, AMD Zen Optimizations

Mageia 7 Beta Finally Rolls Along For Testing

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MDV

It's been a year and a half since the release of Mageia 6 while finally the Mageia 7 beta images have surfaced.

The Mageia 7 Beta is shipping with the KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, is running on the fresh Linux 4.19 kernel, provides the Mesa 18.3 3D drivers, and has a wealth of package updates compared to the state shipped by Mageia 6. Mageia 7 also offers reworked ARM support (including initial AArch64 enablement), DNF as an alternative to URPMI, and a variety of other updates. The in-progress release notes cover some of the other Mageia 7 changes.

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It’s Artwork Time – Mageia 7 Artwork Contest is Open

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MDV

As with every release, the artwork for Mageia 7 comes from you, the great community that supports and makes Mageia possible. It’s time to start the process of getting Mageia 7 ready for release, updating all of the artwork and designs that will make it look great and unique. As in previous years, we’re looking for your contributions and ideas, but not just images and photos – if you have icons and logos, or ideas on how login screens or animations should look, then it’s time to discuss or show them off.

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OpenMandriva Has Been Working On Their RISC-V & AArch64 Ports

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In addition to working on OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 as this distribution's next major release with its roots tracing back to the legendary Mandrake, its developers have also been working on clean ports of this Linux distribution to other CPU architectures.

OpenMandriva has been working on expanding its focus from just Intel x86_64 to a good experience for AMD Ryzen AMD64 and ports to AArch64 and RISC-V too. They are doing since as "other CPU architectures are starting to be fast enough" for desktop/laptop use-cases and "monopolies are harmful."

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It is with great pleasure that we announce the release of Mageia 6.1

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MDV

This release brings all of the updates and development that has gone into Mageia 6 together into fresh installation media, giving users a kernel that supports hardware released after Mageia 6. The new installations will benefit from the countless updates that current fully updated Mageia systems will have, allowing new installations to avoid the need for a large update post install. So if you are currently running an up to date Mageia 6 system, there is no need to reinstall Mageia 6.1 as you will already be running the same packages.

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OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Alpha Surfaces

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MDV

We've been looking forward to the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 release for a number of months now with Lx 3.0 having debuted two years ago. Fortunately, that release is inching closer to release as this week the alpha release is now available for testing.

OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 is a big release and as such is taking a long time to get into shape for release. Some of the big ticket items include switching back from RPM5 to RPM4, utilizing Fedora's DNF package manager, shipping with Linux 4.17~4.18 , LLVM Clang 7 as the default compiler while GCC 8 is also available , complete support for AArch64, and a variety of package updates.

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More in Tux Machines

Thin clients showcase new Gemini Lake Refresh chips

The Futro S9010, S7010, and S5010, which we saw on Fanless Tech, are intended to run the proprietary, Linux-based eLux RP 6.7.0 CR, although they also support Windows 10 IoT Enterprise. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Headlines, LibreOffice 6.4 Alpha Quick Look and OpenIndiana 2019.10 Overview

Announcing coreboot 4.11

The coreboot project is proud to announce to have released coreboot 4.11. This release cycle was a bit shorter to get closer to our regular schedule of releasing in spring and autumn. Since 4.10 there were 1630 new commits by over 130 developers. Of these, about 30 contributed to coreboot for the first time. Thank you to all contributors who made 4.11 what it is and welcome to the project to all new contributors! Read more Also: Coreboot 4.11 Brings Many Intel Improvements, New Support For Supermicro / Lenovo Boards

GNOME Development: Technical Reports From Federico Mena-Quintero and Jussi Pakkanen

  • Refactoring the Length type

    Over a couple of years, librsvg's type that represents CSS lengths went from a C representation along the lines of "all data in the world is an int", to a Rust representation that uses some interesting type trickery: C struct with char for units. C struct with a LengthUnits enum. C struct without an embodied direction; each place that needs to normalize needs to get the orientation right. C struct with a built-in direction as an extra field, done at initialization time. Same struct but in Rust. An ugly but workable Parse trait so that the direction can be set at parse/initialization time. Three newtypes LengthHorizontal, LengthVertical, LengthBoth with a common core. A cleaned-up Parse trait. A macro to generate those newtypes. Replace the LengthDir enum with an Orientation trait, and three zero-sized types Horizontal/Vertical/Both that implement the trait. Replace most of the macro with a helper trait LengthTrait that has an Orientation associated type. Replace the helper trait with a single Length<T: Orientation> type, which puts the orientation as a generic parameter. The macro disappears and there is a single implementation for everything. Refactoring never ends!

  • Some intricacies of ABI stability

    As far as I know, there is no known real-world solution to this problem that would scale to a full operating system (i.e. all of Debian, FreeBSD or the like). If there are any university professors reading this needing problems for your grad students, this could be one of them. The problem itself is fairly simple to formulate: make it possible to run two different, ABI incompatible C++ standard libraries within one process. The solution will probably require changes in the compiler, linker and runtime loader. For example, you might extend symbol resolution rules so that they are not global, but instead symbols from, say library bar would first be looked up in its direct descendents (in this case only abi2) and only after that in other parts of the tree. To get you started, here is one potential solution I came up with while writing this post. I have no idea if it actually works, but I could not come up with an obvious thing that would break. I sadly don't have the time or know-how to implement this, but hopefully someone else has.