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Mandriva Linux: A Look Back at the Late, Great Open Source OS

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MDV

Remember Mandriva Linux? Once among the most popular Linux-based open source operating systems, it disappeared last year, along with Mandriva, Inc., the company that owned it. Belatedly, here's a retrospective look at late, great Mandriva Linux.

I was reminded of Mandriva recently while updating The VAR Guy's Open Source 50 list. As the list shows, in 2012 The VAR Guy (who is not me, by the way) expressed doubts about Mandriva's future. He turned out to be right. (When is he not?) In May 2015 Mandriva Inc. ceased operating and its GNU/Linux distribution disappeared.

But the open source OS's inglorious and little-reported demise belied the importance it once held within the open source ecosystem. Born in 1998 as a Red Hat-based GNU/Linux distribution originally known as Mandrake, Mandriva stood out from the pack by offering one of the first truly user-friendly open source operating systems.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 RC1 arrives!!

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Good news from OpenMandriva Community!

A while after Beta2 we are glad to announce OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 RC1 release.

Work for the RC1 has further improved stability and performance. We have now support for the Japanese and Chinese languages so we would really welcome any feedback from those who speak them.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 RC1 Released

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta 2 Brings Linux Kernel 4.6.2, systemd 230 & F2FS Support

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MDV

Today, June 27, 2016, the OpenMandriva team was happy to inform Softpedia via an email announcement that the second Beta release of the upcoming OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 operating system is now ready for public testing.

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OpenMandriva: We Are the Only GNU/Linux Distro to Use Clang as the Main Compiler

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GNU
Linux
MDV

Softpedia has been informed by the OpenMandriva Team that the upcoming OpenMandriva Lx3 GNU/Linux operating system will use the LLVM Clang compiler by default.

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OpenMandriva Adds F2FS Support

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It's been a while since last having anything to report on with the OpenMandriva Linux distribution, but they wrote in today with news about adding Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) support.

Within their OpenMandriva "Cooker" development repository is the most interesting support with F2FS support being part of their kernel, shipping f2fs-tools by default, and their Calamares installer allowing F2FS for SSD disks. They've also added a F2FS patch for GRUB2. With that work in OpenMandriva Cooker, users can be running F2FS as their root file-system with ease!

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After Months of Hard Work, OpenMandriva Now Has Its Own Development Environment

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Development
MDV

Softpedia has been informed today, April 18, 2016, by the OpenMandriva Team about the project's brand-new and fully functional development environment, dubbed ABF (Automated Build Farm).

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OpenMandriva Lx3 Linux Beta 1 Released with KDE Plasma 5.6, Mesa 11.2, and More

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Softpedia was informed a few minutes ago by the OpenMandriva Team about the immediate availability for download of the first Beta build of the upcoming OpenMandriva Lx3 GNU/Linux operating system.

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Mageia Updates

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MDV
  • Mageia was at SCaLE 14x

    Mageia made it to SCaLE 14x for the first time in sunny California, with one of our dedicated QA deputy leaders to man the booth.

    Bill Kenney, or wilcal as he is known here, did an amazing job running the Mageia booth at SCaLE. This is an extract from his report on the event.

    The Mageia booth was located right in the centre of the Pasadena Convention Center on January 22nd – 24th. Friday saw the highest traffic, Saturday was quieter, but lots of families came down to see the exhibits, which is always nice to see.

  • Upgrading to Mageia 5

    To be honest, today I was postponing the upgrade because the machine, a rather old Toshiba Satellite which, oh horror, came with Windows VISTA preloaded, put up a fight when I installed Mageia 2 to it.

Playing on OpenMandriva LX 2014.2

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MDV

I reinstalled OpenMandriva LX 2014.2 today. Last time I did, I had some problems updating: many packages were not found but, even so, I proceeded with the upgrading.

The OS was working perfectly except for the performance of games on Steam.

Today, I followed what I learned yesterday and, when I hit the first problem, I stopped the update and deleted all the repos. Then, I retrieved them again (they were marked as phosphorous 2014.0, which I believe was the previous version), but the update went on smoothly and I got the most recent packages, like Firefox 44.

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OpenMandriva Lx 2015 Finally Reaches Beta State

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MDV

The OpenMandriva Lx camp has released their 2015 Beta release in time for this weekend's FOSDEM conference happening this weekend in Brussels.

While we are now into 2016 and its been a number of months (April of 2015 since the alpha release, OpenMandriva Lx 2015 Beta was finally made public today. The latest stable release of OpenMandriva remains at 2014.2.

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Android Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • 8 hurdles IT must overcome if they want open source success
    Open source software has the potential to drive innovation and collaboration across an enterprise, and can transform the way developers work together. "Open source is now part of the evaluation criteria when deciding on a software platform, so much so that it is expected," said Matt Ingenthron, senior director of engineering at Couchbase. "In this way, open source has somewhat faded into the background in a positive way. Just like no consumer would inquire if a mobile phone had internet access or text messaging, choosing an open source solution is almost always an option."
  • Sprint calls on open source analytics to prevent cyberfraud
    Mobile phone-related fraud is big business. Fraudsters, hackers, and other bad actors employ creative techniques to compromise networks, hijack user information, and piece together customer identities that are then sold for big bucks on the dark web. To protect its customers, Sprint needed to transform the way it detected and blocked fraudulent activity. “In the mobile phone business, there’s no markup on selling devices — our bread and butter is the network and the services that are delivered on that network, through the devices,” says Scott Rice, CIO of Sprint. “Identity theft is a huge problem and the ability for nefarious actors to use that theft of information to impersonate our customers means we were eating the costs of the devices and the costs of services delivery.”
  • Open Source Platform Delivers LDAP Integration
    The latest release of InfluxData, an open source platform for metrics, events, and other time series data, adds LDAP integration, new advanced analytics, and self-healing capabilities in the time series database platform. According to the company, time series data, collected and stored with InfluxData’s Time Series database platform is integral to observability and is becoming mission critical for organizations. Enhancements to InfluxEnterprise make it easier for administrators to keep this mission critical data available and secure by checking and verifying every requested action. This includes creating databases, storing data and running queries – against a user’s stored authorizations and role.
  • YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition Release: Free and Open Source
    The YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition, customized and developed by YOYOW and based on WeCenter Q&A community framework, has been released on GitHub. Compared to regular WeCenter frameworks, YOYOW is providing free open source services and will be continually iterating products and will be introducing an incentive mechanism. Each Q&A community can directly integrate into YOYOW's bottom layer network and enjoy the network services provided by YOYOW.
  • Add-on Recommended By Mozilla Caught Logging Users’ Browsing History
    According to the reports by Mike Kuketz, an independent security blogger from Germany and uBlock Origin, an add-on named “Web Security” has been caught collecting users’ browsing history. [...] Soon after this discovery by Hill, Kuketz added a post on his blog about the same extension pointing to the same strange behavior of the add-on. A user on Kuketz’s blog decoded the garbled data and found that the add-on was collecting users’ browsing history and sending it to a German server.
  • Zombies: Top 5 Open Source Vulnerabilities That Refuse To Die [Ed: Microsoft partner WhiteSource continues to stigmatise FOSS as a security nightmare, using bugs branded by other Microsoft partner for extra panic]
  • How a civic hacker used open data to halve tickets at Chicago's most confusing parking spot
    Matt Chapman used the Freedom of Information Act to get the City of Chicago's very mess parking ticket data; after enormous and heroic data normalization, Chapman was able to pinpoint one of the city's most confusing parking spots, between 1100-1166 N State St, which cycled between duty as a taxi-stand and a parking spot with a confusingly placed and semi-busted parking meter. After surveying the site and deducing the problem, Chapman contacted the alderman responsible for that stretch of North State Street, and, eight months later, the signage was cleaned up and made more intuitive. Followup data analysis showed that Chapman's work had halved the number of parking tickets issued on the spot, with 600-odd fewer tickets in the past 20 months, for a savings of $60,000 to Chicago motorists.
  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a New Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors
    Bluespec Inc. has released Piccolo, its first in a family of RISC-V open-source processors provided as a vehicle for open innovation in embedded systems. Piccolo is a 3-stage RV32IM processor whose small “footprint” is ideal for many IoT applications. The repository (https://github.com/bluespec/Piccolo) contains a royalty-free synthesizable Verilog core that can be easily integrated and deployed into an ASIC or FPGA. Bluespec, Inc. will actively maintain Piccolo. It also offers commercial-grade tools for the customization and verification of RISC-V cores. Configurations will be continually added to provide the full spectrum of embedded controller features. Companies or universities interested in contributing to the Piccolo project should contact Bluespec, Inc. (add contact – RISC-V open source support).

KDE Applications 18.08 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New

Being in development for the past several months, KDE Applications 18.08 goes stable today and will hit the software repositories of various popular GNU/Linux distributions during the next few days. This is a major release and brings numerous new features and improvements across multiple apps, including Dolphin, Konsole, Gwenview, KMail, Akonadi, Cantor, Spectacle, and others. "We continuously work on improving the software included in our KDE Application series, and we hope you will find all the new enhancements and bug fixes useful," reads today's announcement. "More than 120 bugs have been resolved in applications including the Kontact Suite, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Gwenview, Kate, Konsole, Okular, Spectacle, Umbrello and more!" Read more

Security Leftovers

  • How to Protect Your PC From the Intel Foreshadow Flaws
  • AT&T Sued After SIM Hijacker Steals $24 Million in Customer's Cryptocurrency
    It has only taken a few years, but the press, public and law enforcement appear to finally be waking up to the problem of SIM hijacking. SIM hijacking (aka SIM swapping or a "port out scam") involves a hacker hijacking your phone number, porting it over to their own device (often with a wireless carrier employee's help), then taking control of your personal accounts. As we've been noting, the practice has heated up over the last few years, with countless wireless customers saying their entire identities were stolen after thieves ported their phone number to another carrier, then took over their private data. Sometimes this involves selling valuable Instagram account names for bitcoin; other times it involves clearing out the target's banking or cryptocurrency accounts. Case in point: California authorities recently brought the hammer down on one 20-year-old hacker, who had covertly ported more than 40 wireless user accounts, in the process stealing nearly $5 million in bitcoin. One of the problems at the core of this phenomenon is that hackers have either tricked or paid wireless carrier employees to aid in the hijacking, or in some instances appear to have direct access to (apparently) poorly-secured internal carrier systems. That has resulted in lawsuits against carriers like T-Mobile for not doing enough to police their own employees, the unauthorized access of their systems, or the protocols utilized to protect consumer accounts from this happening in the first place.
  • Voting Machine Vendors, Election Officials Continue To Look Ridiculous, As Kids Hack Voting Machines In Minutes
  • Security updates for Thursday