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ROSA Fresh R8.1 Linux OS Launches with Kernel 4.9 LTS Patched for Intel Skylake

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The developers of the ROSA GNU/Linux distribution derived from Mandriva announced the general availability of the R8.1 maintenance update for the ROSA Fresh 2014.1 stable series of the operating system.

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ROSA Fresh R8.1 release updated.

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Here we are happy to present the next correcting release of ROSA Fresh R8 platform by launching updated ROSA Fresh R8.1 version.

This ROSA Fresh R8.1 release is primary purposed for users who need stable LTS platform on modern hardware.

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The next step towards Mageia 6 is here, announcing sta2

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Everyone at Mageia is delighted to announce the release of our latest development milestone, our second stabilisation snapshot (sta2). We are now one step closer to the release of Mageia 6!

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PCLinuxOS 2017.03 KDE Edition Lands with KDE Plasma 5.8.6 LTS, Linux Kernel 4.9

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MDV

The developers of the PCLinuxOS distribution announced the release of PCLinuxOS 2017.03 KDE Edition, an updated install medium that ships with all the latest KDE technologies and applications.

Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.9.13 kernel, PCLinuxOS 2017.03 KDE Edition includes the KDE Plasma 5.8.6 LTS (Long Term Support) desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, and KDE Frameworks 5.31.0.

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Mageia 6 and OpenMandriva Lx

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  • A Glimpse of Mageia 6: Mageia 6 Sta2

    I noticed that the icons were new and the DE is more responsive that the beta that I had installed previously. I particularly loved the new icon for the Mageia Control Center (it reminded me of the nazar in Pisi Linux).

    I used the system a bit to see if I could detect certain glitches even though I know this is not a final version. My intention is not to write a review, but to assess potential problems and, most importantly, to get more familiar with Mageia running Plasma 5.

  • Upgrade to OpenMandriva Lx 3

    My HP Pavilion has been running OpenMandriva 2014 exclusively, but I decided to upgrade it to OpenMandriva Lx 3 last week.

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0: a faint shadow of name

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Reviews

The general feel of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 was fast and solid.

However, that was only on the surface. As soon as you start to look just a little bit deeper, issues go out here and there. High memory usage, keyboard layout glitch, inadequate size of notification area icons, problems with updates - all of that leave a bad taste after the Live Run of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0.

Will it ever gain the popularity its parent had just few years ago? I have a very big doubt.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.01 review

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Reviews

OpenMandriva is a Linux distribution whose roots and traditions date back to the Mandrake/Mandriva Linux era, what it has in common with with ROSA Linux and Mageia. The latest edition of the desktop distribution – OpenMandriva Lx 3.01, was released on December 25 2016, so it was a nice Christmas present to OpenMandriva fans.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.01 Released with KDE Plasma 5.8.4 LTS and Linux Kernel 4.9

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Softpedia was informed by the OpenMandriva team about the release and general availability of the OpenMandriva Lx 3.01 GNU/Linux operating system for personal computers.

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Those Meaningful Gifts... Thanks, OpenMandriva!!

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Yesterday, I read an email coming from the mail list of OpenMandriva. It was an announcement about an unexpected release: The community had been working on a surprise and released OpenMandriva Lx 3.01 as a Christmas gift.

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ROSA Desktop Fresh R8 Plasma 5: is it near-perfect?

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Reviews

ROSA is a Linux distribution forked some time ago from Mandriva Linux by a team of Russian developers, Rosa Lab, or officially LLC NTC-IT ROSA.

I reviewed their distributions several times: ROSA KDE R7, ROSA Desktop 2012 and even interviewed the ROSA team.

The most recent release of ROSA is now ROSA Desktop Fresh R8, which is available in several flavours: MATE, GNOME 3, KDE 4 and Plasma 5. I decided to try the Plasma 5 edition of this distribution, especially as my interest to Plasma increased after the good impression Kubuntu 16.10 left on me.

There are links to the ISO images available on the ROSA download page, and I used it to get my own version of this Linux distribution. The size of ROSA Desktop Fresh R8 Plasma 5 64-bit image is 1.9 Gb. The dd command helped me to "burn" the image to the USB stick.

So, the USB drive is attached to my Toshiba Satellite L500-19X laptop. Reboot. Choose to boot from USB. Let's go!

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Red Hat Leftovers

  • Celebrating KEDA 1.0: Providing an event-driven scale capability for any container workload [Ed: Red Hat works with and for Microsoft, even gives Microsoft all the code]

    Today the community celebrates KEDA 1.0, an open source project aimed at providing event-driven scale capabilities for container workloads. Introduced earlier this year, Red Hat is contributing to KEDA both via the upstream project and by bringing its utility to customers using enterprise Kubernetes and containers with Red Hat OpenShift. We celebrate this milestone with Microsoft and the wider community.

  • We're all on a journey to cloud-native adoption together

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is hosting its core conference for the fifth year running. It’s official title is KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, but it’s most importantly the home for Kubernetes. Adopters, contributors, and Kubernetes-curious attendees add up to a record-breaking 12,000 people. I attended to cover the show for our community (full disclosure: my ticket was provided as an industry analyst). Here’s what I heard on day 1.

  • Container reality checks and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update. [...] The impact: Another container reality check that also drives home why going through the trouble of standards can be worth it in the long run.

Google outlines plans for mainline Linux kernel support in Android

This is an extremely long journey that results in every device shipping millions of lines of out-of-tree kernel code. Every shipping device kernel is different and device specific—basically no device kernel from one phone will work on another phone. The mainline kernel version for a device is locked in at the beginning of an SoC's initial development, so it's typical for a brand-new device to ship with a Linux kernel that is two years old. Even Google's latest and, uh, greatest device, the Pixel 4, shipped in October 2019 with Linux kernel 4.14, an LTS release from November 2017. It will be stuck on kernel 4.14 forever, too. Android devices do not get kernel updates, probably thanks to the incredible amount of work needed to produce just a single device kernel, and the chain of companies that would need to cooperate to do it. Thanks to kernel updates never happening, this means every new release of Android usually has to support the last three years of LTS kernel releases (the minimum for Android 10 is 4.9, a 2016 release). Google's commitments to support older versions of Android with security patches means the company is still supporting kernel 3.18, which is five years old now. Google's band-aid solution for this so far has been to team up with the Linux community and support mainline Linux LTS releases for longer, and they're now up to six years of support. Last year, at Linux Plumbers Conference 2018, Google announced its initial investigation into bringing the Android kernel closer to mainline Linux. This year it shared a bit more detail on its progress so far, but it's definitely still a work in progress. "Today, we don't know what it takes to be added to the kernel to run on a [specific] Android device," Android Kernel Team lead Sandeep Patil told the group at LPC 2019. "We know what it takes to run Android but not necessarily on any given hardware. So our goal is to basically find all of that out, then upstream it and try to be as close to mainline as possible." Read more

Thin clients showcase new Gemini Lake Refresh chips

The Futro S9010, S7010, and S5010, which we saw on Fanless Tech, are intended to run the proprietary, Linux-based eLux RP 6.7.0 CR, although they also support Windows 10 IoT Enterprise. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Headlines, LibreOffice 6.4 Alpha Quick Look and OpenIndiana 2019.10 Overview