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Mandriva Screenshots

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MDV
-s

Having just recovered from strep throat and having to return to work, I've not had time or energy as of yet to do a proper review of Mandrive 2005. But I have some initial thoughts and screenshots ready for your viewing.

Your Very Own Mandriva

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MDV
HowTos
-s

Here's one method for getting Mandriva 10.2, aka Mandriva 2005, before the public iso release in two weeks.

Mandriva 10.2/2005 Report

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MDV

According to the twiki, the release schedule has been updated to April 14. Talk in the forum leads one to believe torrents will be available to club members first. The twiki lists Limited Edition becoming available for everyone on May 1. Powerpacks will include versions for both 32 and 64 bit arch.

UPDATE: ISO to club soon

10.2 tree currently being mirrored on the mirror reference machine.

Final UPDATE: It's been released to club members.

Mandriva Release Delayed

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MDV

Details are sketchy at this time, however Mandriva is reportedly delayed due to some kernel issues. More on this as it develops.

Mandriva 10.2 Out Tomorrow?

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MDV

"still planned for Tuesday, as per the wiki...however, warly might have done the final images by now, not sure..."

warly answers, "I will try to update [something], but the iso are mostly final now, I only need to fix that indexhtml package.

I hope to have the final ISO by tomorrow morning."

theinquirer covers Mandrake Change

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MDV

theinquirer says, "Male duck to Italian car you know it makes sense." lol... anyway, here's their blurb.

Take Part In The Mandriva Club Contest And Spread The New Mandriva Name!

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MDV

On the occasion of adopting its new name, the Mandriva Club is launching a contest to accelerate the spread and the recognition of the Mandriva brand name, by using it in as many places as possible.

teehee

Mandrakesoft Announces Name Change!

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MDV

After spending weeks balancing pros and cons, Mandrakesoft has decided to change its name!

And the winner is...

Mandrake Thinking Name Change?

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MDV

There's an interesting thread running on one of the mandrake mailing lists discussing the possibility of an upcoming name change since their buy out of Connectiva. Seems there may be some truth to the rumors as a whois it might prove.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

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MDV

Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

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