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MDV

OpenMandriva Picks Name, Releases Alpha

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MDV

ostatic.com: While the rest of Linuxdom was reading of the Debian 7.0 and Mageia 3 releases, the OpenMandriva gang have been hard at it trying to get their new distribution some attention.

OpenMandriva Delayed, Mageia Releases Beta

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Linux
MDV
Ubuntu
  • OpenMandriva Delayed, Mageia Releases Beta
  • DistroRank Weekly rankings posted - 4/4/13
  • Emmabuntüs 2 celebrated Software Freedom Day
  • Bytemark donation boosts reliability of Debian's core infrastructure
  • Moving to Arch from Ubuntu!
  • Ubuntu “Raring Ringtail” hits beta, disables Windows dual-boot tool
  • Three Ubuntu Linux versions will reach end of life in May

Mandriva invests in Formula One racing

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MDV
Humor

mandriva.com: Mandriva S.A. , the leading European Linux based software vendor, is unveiling the new milestone in its corporate strategy. Mandriva S.A. will now invest in Formula One racing.

OpenMandriva's "Get a Face" Finalists Chosen

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MDV

ostatic.com: Well the public has had its say and now it's up to the committee. Seven finalists were chosen by the public, now all they can do is wait.

OpenMandriva Honing in on Logo

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MDV

ostatic.com: Last month OpenMandriva announced a contest to solicit community contributed logo proposals. The entry deadline has come and gone and the next phase has begun. Let's take a look at some of the proposals.

Design the New OpenMandriva Logo

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MDV

ostatic.com: It's at times like these that make me wish I had been the source of my son's artistic abilities, but alas, those must have come from his father's side. Since my images rarely resemble what I'm attempting, OpenMandriva is going to have to rely upon you to design and create their new logo.

It's Official: OpenMandriva Association Incorporated

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MDV

ostatic.com: Charles-H. Schulz has posted of the news that "OpenMandriva Association is now fully incorporated and functional." He's quite excited by the news reflected not just in his words, but the number of his posts that appeared in my feeds. I found three posts just by accident.

OpenMandriva: It's Almost a Done Deal

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MDV

ostatic.com: Today Charles-H. Schulz blogged to share that "the statutes of the "OpenMandriva Association" have been sent to the French authorities and the incorporation process has thus started."

Mandriva Alpha Tests New Name, Mageia Needs Artwork

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Linux
MDV

ostatic.com: The second alpha of upcoming Mandriva 2012, announced on November 6, reflects some progress while other issues remain. Mageia ran a contest for artwork during the version 2 developmental phase, and it was such a success, they're doing it again for 3. So, test Mandriva and draw some pretty pictures for Mageia.

ROSA Marathon 2012 review - Ahem

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Linux
MDV

dedoimedo.com: ROSA is a Mandriva-based distribution forged in Russia, offering five years of support in the manner of Ubuntu. I think this is officially only the second such release for desktops, excluding the CentOS family. Definitely interesting.

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