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MDV

First Mandriva Foundation Meeting a Success

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MDV

ostatic.com: Members of Mandriva met in Paris today discuss the future of the struggling Linux distribution. Schulz blogged after the meeting to brief interested parties in the progress, stating it had been a "fantastic day."

New Mandriva Foundation Nears Milestone

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MDV

ostatic.com: Mandriva is in the process of building a foundation and creating a community to help develop future versions of their desktop Linux distribution. Today, Charles Schulz posted on the Mandriva blog to announce the first "milestone."

Mandriva finally died! Well, sort of...

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MDV

mandrivachronicles.blogspot: Many Linux users have already proclaimed Mandriva deceased and buried it. But is this old Linux distro quite dead? Well, yes. Sort of. Mandriva became a zombie!

Charles-H. Schulz Joins Mandriva's Recovery Team

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MDV

ostatic.com: Today Charles-H. Schulz posted a short message on Mandriva's official blog stating that he will be joining the Mandriva team to help them come back to life.

Mandriva has become a joke

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MDV

itwire.com: Mandriva SA, the French company that used to control development of the Mandriva GNU/Linux distribution, has become something of a joke.

Mandriva Returning to Community

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MDV

ostatic.com: In a blog post today Mandriva COO Jean-Manuel Croset announced that the new strategy going forward will be to let "the distribution evolve in and under the caring responsibility of the community."

ROSALabs Releases New Distribution

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Linux
MDV

ostatic.com: ROSALabs, Mandriva's partner on their last desktop, has been working on their own Linux distribution and have recently announced their latest release. If you liked Mandriva 2011, then you'll probably like ROSA Marathon 2012.

Mandriva Community Planning Next Release

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MDV

ostatic.com: While waiting for the Mandriva management to decide the future direction of the distribution, the community is taking matters into their own hands and beginning the planning stages for the next release, assumed to be Mandriva Linux 2012.

Mandriva Receives Reprieve, Future Still Uncertain

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MDV

ostatic.com: Today Jean-Manuel Croset, Mandriva COO, announced that enough funds have been secured to allow Mandriva to keep its doors open and continue development. With Croset saying little else, users at least have a nugget of good news to sustain them.

Mandriva – Customization With Style

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MDV

techzed.net: It took me literally hours to figure out which Linux distributions I would want to download and test. In this little article I will try to go over some of the basic features of one of my favorites, Mandriva.

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