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The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva One 2010.0 With GNOME

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Mandriva One 2010.0 desktop (with the GNOME desktop environment) that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.

Mandriva One 2010.0 (including Moblin UI)

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zdnet.co.uk/blog: If you have had trouble with the new Ubuntu 9.10 distribution, or you are a bit reluctant about it because of the numerous reports of problems circulating... or even if you are just becoming uneasy about the direction that Canonical is moving, then this could be a very good time to take a look at Mandriva Linux.

Mandriva Linux 2010 (Free)

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desktoplinuxreviews.com: For this review I picked the Mandriva Linux 2010 (Free) version. This version contains 100% free software and weighs in at a chunky 4.3GB when you download it.

Mandriva Linux 2010 – Perhaps The Best Linux Release All Year

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makeuseof.com: Mandriva Linux 2010 was recently released and brings lots of nice improvements to an already nice system. The best two so far have been the increased stability and performance.

Mandriva : First on Distrowatch for the last 7 days

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linux-wizard.net: I couldn't resist once I learn it on Facebook after a wall post by Blino: Mandriva is ranked at first position on Distrowatch for the last 7 days. This is awesome!

Mandriva Linux 2010 – Very Impressive

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pbs01.wordpress: A couple of days ago, Mandriva released the new version of its operating system, Mandriva Linux 2010. I downloaded the One edition to give it a spin.

Very quick look at Mandriva 2010

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Mandriva 2010 installation walk through

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ghacks.net: Mandriva is another one of the Linux distributions that has been around for quite some time. This installation will be accomplished with the help of the Live CD. Once you are up and running you will see the Install icon on the desktop. Double click that icon to begin the installation.

Mandriva 2010: Meh

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techiemoe.com: Mandriva isn't as popular as it once was. There was a time when a Mandriva (then Mandrake) release was as important as the latest and greatest from Redhat or SuSE. Lately (at least in my little corner of the world) Mandriva has just been sort of a "Meh" distribution. It's a shame, really.

Mandriva 2010 packs a punch

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mybroadband.co.za: Ubuntu Linux may get the majority of attention from Linux watchers but there are many good alternatives available. One of those is Mandriva Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

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Leftovers: KDE and Qt

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    We recently added a new toy to The Qt Project, and I wanted to give an overview on what it is and how it can be used.
  • Qt World Summit 2017 Call for Presentations
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    KDevelop, your cross-platform IDE, since version 5.1 has initial OpenCL language support.

Oh Snap – to boldly package where no one has packaged before

One of the great disadvantages of the Linux desktop is its software distribution mechanism. While the overall concept of central software repos works great and has been adapted into powerful Stores in commercial products, deploying and using programs, delivered as packages, is a tricky business. It stems from the wider fragmentation of the distro ecospace, and it essence, it means that if you want to release your product, you must compile it 150 odd ways, not just for different distributions but also for different versions of the same distribution. Naturally, this model scares away the big game. Recently though, there have been several attempts to make Linux packages more cross-distro and minimize the gap between distributions. The name of the game: Snap, and we’ve tasted this app-container framework before. It is unto Linux what, well, Windows stuff is unto Windows, in a way. Not quite statically compiled stuff, but definitely independent. I had it tested again in Ubuntu 17.04, and it would appear that Snap is getting more and more traction. Let’s have another look. Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation

As usual, Kubuntu 17.04 does not give you any surprises. It is stable and reliable. It is reasonably resource-hungry. There are no wonders in this new release. Just a well-rounded distribution for everyday use. Yes, there are small bugs or inconveniences here and there, but they are not huge and can be easily fixed, replaced or lived with. The biggest of them for me, of course, is the lack of multimedia codecs. You can heal that easily. Read more