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A Taste of Spring: The Mandriva One 2009.1 Experience

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zwuser.wordpress: I just got the news last week that Mandriva released their latest and greatest version, 2009.1 a.k.a Spring. For convenience sake, I decided to get the Mandriva One KDE CD image.

Why prefer Mandriva over another distribution?

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artipc10.vub.ac.be: What is the the advantage of Mandriva above other distributions like Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and Fedora. I wrote down a couple of reasons why I use Mandriva on my desktop systems.

Mandriva 2009 Spring Kicks Vista7 back to /dev/null

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izanbardprince.wordpress: With my latest foray into Windows 7 build 7100 (official Release Candidate from MS Technet) I was experiencing largely the same errors/issues/bad performance as I had on the unofficial 7057 and 7077 wherein everyone replied “Hold your horses”

Mandriva's latest touted for fast boots

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desktoplinux.com: Mandriva has released the final version of Mandriva Linux Spring 2009. The new version offers KDE 4.2.2 as the default desktop, delivers up to 25 percent faster boots, supports additional netbooks, and provides enhanced networking and security tools.

Celebrate Spring with Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring

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blog.mandriva.com: Mandriva announces today the launch of the final version of Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring. Quicker, easier and even more secure this new version brings you a host of innovative functionalities.

Mandriva 2009.1 Preview and Screenshots

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techenclave.com: Mandriva one of the leading distro provider has finally released their last testing version for their upcoming spanking distro named 2009.1 Spring ... 2009.1 tries mend the flaws that 2009.0 came with..

Mainstream Linux gets more netbook-friendly

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apcmag.com: Eager to add Penguin-power to your pint-sized portable? New releases of Mandriva and KDE Desktop are being optimised for a better netbook experience.

Mandriva 2009.1 (rc1) on the Acer Aspire One

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userapps.sf.net: For a while now I have been considering buying a netbook to look at photos, read email, browse the internet, and one or two other activities. Two weeks ago, I decided to buy an Acer Aspire One 110 and running Mandriva.

Mandriva 2009.1 RC2 Screenshot Tour

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softpedia.com: Mandriva announced last night the immediate availability of Mandriva Linux 2009.1 RC2. Once again, we thought it would be nice to offer a visual tour of this second release candidate of the upcoming Mandriva 2009 Spring.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring RC2 is ready for tests

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blog.mandriva.com: The RC2 release of Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring (code name Estephe) is now available. This RC2 version provides some updates on major desktop components of the distribution, including KDE 4.2.2, GNOME 2.26,X.org server 1.6, kernel 2.6.29.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

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    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

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Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.