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Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 2 released

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MDV

Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 2 is released today. This alpha introduces KDE 4 - 4.1 beta 2, specifically - as the default version of KDE, and the latest development version of GNOME, 2.23.4. The kernel has also been updated to 2.6.26rc7. Mandriva warns that this is a true alpha, likely to contain many bugs related to the new version of KDE.

Eating Crow: Ubuntu Not Better Than Mandriva

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Ubuntu

blogbeebe.blogspot: I could spend the next hour of my personal time (and a lot of digital ink) listing in detail what has gone wrong over the last year, as I've migrated from Ubuntu 7.04 to Ubuntu 8.04.1. In fact, the Linux Haters Blog is surprisingly close to documenting most, if not all, of my gripes.

Mandriva Linux - Wonderful and Maddening

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zdnet.co.uk/blog: Well, since I've gone through both Ubuntu and openSuSE Linux, and my curiosity about Unix systems in general has really started to kick in, I've decided to go through a few more variants to see what they are like. The next candidate is Mandriva Linux.

Linux Distros - My Upgrade Mandate — Mandriva Challenge

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easylinuxguide.com/blog: In my last blog article I talked about how much progress the major distros have made lately in terms of creating much smoother and more usable interfaces for the general new Linux user. One major downfall remained. This article is about Mandriva.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 1: no public release

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mandrivaclub.com: Those of you who saw the recent announcement of the Mandriva Linux 2009 release schedule may be wondering about the status of Alpha 1, which was scheduled for public release on June 25th. Due to some major problems we have decided not to make a public release of Alpha 1.

Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch

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SUSE
-s

Last fall when the two mega-distros openSUSE and Mandriva both hit the mirrors, it was difficult to decide which I liked better. In an attempt to narrow it down, I ran some light-hearted tests and found Mandriva won out in a side-by-side comparison. But things change rapidly in the Linux world and I wondered how a competition of the newest releases would come out. Mandriva 2008.1 was released this past April and openSUSE 11.0 was released just last week.

Looking for a nice KDE distribution? Try Mandriva 2008 Spring

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siberian.ws: My old laptop Acer Aspire 1705SMi with Pentium 4 3GHz and 1 GB RAM started to show its age. Windows XP did not run on it exceptionally well, so I decided to install Linux on it too.

Mandriva's Linux on a stick will wow all the ladies this Summer

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theregister.co.uk: Mandriva Linux recently announced the Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring operating system, the latest version of its Linux-on-a-USB-stick distro. The Flash sticks come with a complete, bootable version of Mandriva Linux and make it dead simple to take your Linux with you wherever you go - a huge help when you're trying to impress the babes at the beach.

Mandriva Linux 2009 plans announced

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mandriva.com: Mandriva Linux 2009 comes a step closer to reality today with the unveiling of the release schedule and the technical specifications. The schedule includes two alphas, two betas, and two release candidates, prior to the final release in early October 2008. The first alpha release is scheduled for June 25th - just a week away.

Mandriva Linux One Spring 2008 Review

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ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: This month’s Linux Format Magazine had Mandriva on it and it could run as a LiveCD, so I’m doing this review within the LiveCD. The first thing that pops up (from Mandriva - as opposed to from LxF’s formatting of the disc) is a language dialog box.

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Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.

today's howtos

Chew on this: Ubuntu Core Linux comes to the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board

Linux and other open source software have been in the news quite a bit lately. As more and more people are seeing, closed source is not the only way to make money. A company like Red Hat, for instance, is able to be profitable while focusing its business on open source. Ubuntu is one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and it is not hard to see why. Not only is it easy to use and adaptable to much hardware (such as SoC boards), but there is a ton of free support online from the Ubuntu user community too. Today, Canonical announces a special Ubuntu Core image for the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board. Read more