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Mandriva Linux Community Newsletter #129

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MDV

mandriva.com: Welcome to the Mandriva Linux Community Newsletter - dedicated to keeping you up-to-date with the latest Mandriva-related news & info. This time we cover the new Mandriva Flash release, an interesting research project, Mandriva in Nicaragua, and more.

Mandriva Corporate Desktop (what about it?)

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MDV

beranger.org: There was a recent discussion on the French Mandriva forum, about a possible free LTS version of Mandriva. Someone mentioned the Corporate Desktop and Corporate Server line — a paying one, à la RHEL and SLED/SLES. The only problem is that Mandriva Corporate Desktop is dead. It was killed using a silencer though.

Mandriva 2009 Alpha 2 Brings You a Beautiful KDE 4 Desktop

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MDV

softpedia.com: Mandriva announced last night the second alpha release of Mandriva 2009, which brings KDE4 (default desktop), GNOME 2.23.4, and support for the newest NVIDIA and ATI/AMD video cards. The development cycle of Mandriva 2009 will continue until the final release in early October, 2008. With the 2009 edition.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 2 released

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Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 2 is released today. This alpha introduces KDE 4 - 4.1 beta 2, specifically - as the default version of KDE, and the latest development version of GNOME, 2.23.4. The kernel has also been updated to 2.6.26rc7. Mandriva warns that this is a true alpha, likely to contain many bugs related to the new version of KDE.

Eating Crow: Ubuntu Not Better Than Mandriva

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MDV
Ubuntu

blogbeebe.blogspot: I could spend the next hour of my personal time (and a lot of digital ink) listing in detail what has gone wrong over the last year, as I've migrated from Ubuntu 7.04 to Ubuntu 8.04.1. In fact, the Linux Haters Blog is surprisingly close to documenting most, if not all, of my gripes.

Mandriva Linux - Wonderful and Maddening

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MDV

zdnet.co.uk/blog: Well, since I've gone through both Ubuntu and openSuSE Linux, and my curiosity about Unix systems in general has really started to kick in, I've decided to go through a few more variants to see what they are like. The next candidate is Mandriva Linux.

Linux Distros - My Upgrade Mandate — Mandriva Challenge

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easylinuxguide.com/blog: In my last blog article I talked about how much progress the major distros have made lately in terms of creating much smoother and more usable interfaces for the general new Linux user. One major downfall remained. This article is about Mandriva.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 1: no public release

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MDV

mandrivaclub.com: Those of you who saw the recent announcement of the Mandriva Linux 2009 release schedule may be wondering about the status of Alpha 1, which was scheduled for public release on June 25th. Due to some major problems we have decided not to make a public release of Alpha 1.

Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch

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SUSE
-s

Last fall when the two mega-distros openSUSE and Mandriva both hit the mirrors, it was difficult to decide which I liked better. In an attempt to narrow it down, I ran some light-hearted tests and found Mandriva won out in a side-by-side comparison. But things change rapidly in the Linux world and I wondered how a competition of the newest releases would come out. Mandriva 2008.1 was released this past April and openSUSE 11.0 was released just last week.

Looking for a nice KDE distribution? Try Mandriva 2008 Spring

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siberian.ws: My old laptop Acer Aspire 1705SMi with Pentium 4 3GHz and 1 GB RAM started to show its age. Windows XP did not run on it exceptionally well, so I decided to install Linux on it too.

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