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Fluxbox

Linux Mint Fluxbox CE, resurrected

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Linux
Fluxbox

linuxmint.com: The Fluxbox Community Edition produced releases for Linux Mint 5 “Elyssa” and Linux Mint 6 “Felicia” and it became quite popular among Linux Mint users. During the release cycle for Linux Mint 7 “Gloria”, no Fluxbox edition was released.

Fluxbox In-Depth: Mad Customization And Other Tips

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Fluxbox

linuxcritic.wordpress: When I was first preparing to switch to Linux many years ago, I went into research mode and looked around the net a bit. At the time, part of the allure of Linux were the crazy cool desktops people had. I discovered that all those amazing desktops were the result of Fluxbox.

Two weeks, still loving Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

berenguel.blogspot: Two and a half weeks ago, I got a netbook and promptly installed Ubuntu, followed by Fluxbox. And after two weeks of almost continued use, I like it even more than when I decided to use it. Some of the points I really enjoy:

Get to know Linux: Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

ghacks.net: If you’ve been around Linux long enough, then you most likely will have heard about Fluxbox. Fluxbox is a desktop that was based on Blackbox 0.61.1, which makes it extremely light weight, fast, and reliable. Fluxbox is also very minimalistic.

Eight Reasons Why Fluxbox Is My Favorite Desktop

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Fluxbox

penguinpetes.com: It happened again, this time at Tech Republic. They ask the question "Which Linux desktop would you show to a new user to impress them?" and Fluxbox once again is left lurking in the shadowy anonymous depths of the dreaded option "other". What the hell does Fluxbox have to DO to get some love around here?

Fluxbox - Ultra-Fast/Simple Linux GUI

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Fluxbox

pcmech.com: One of the big perks of using a Linux distribution is having a choice of what window manager you want to use. The one I’ll be concentrating on is fluxbox, a window manager.

Fluxbox - Why You Might Want to Try It

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Fluxbox

fosswire.com: When you think about desktop environments on Linux/Unix, you’ll probably think GNOME and KDE. Rather than using an integrated suite of programs, you can simply use a standalone window manager and then just run any of the apps you want. Fluxbox is such a window manager.

Fluxbox 1.1 Released, 100+ Changes

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Fluxbox

phoronix.com: Fluxbox 1.0 was released in October of 2007, but its first post-1.0 update has now been released. The source to Fluxbox 1.1 has just hit its SourceForge page, but at this time there is no release announcement nor has their project web-site been updated.

In A State Of Flux

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Fluxbox
HowTos

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: I CAME quite late to the Fluxbox party, and now I am here I wish I had arrived earlier. Fluxbox is a lightweight window manager for the X window system used by Linux distributions. When I say “lightweight”, I mean it is not resource-hungry, so If you like your desktop cluttered with icons and shortcuts, or enjoy fancy 3D, Compiz-driven eye candy, then Fluxbox may not be for you.

Fluxbox Stable 1.0 Released

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Fluxbox

Fluxbox.net: A new stable release! Finally after almost four and a half years with 0.9.x release we got to 1.0.0! This release includes a lot of bugfixes, new styles, updated language support, better shaped corners and much more.

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