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Fluxbox

A weekend with fluxbox.

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Fluxbox

ITtoolbox Blogs: Over the weekend I got into a mood to try out another window manager besides my beloved KDE. Warning! There may be some prejudice here Smile I thought that if I could find a good WM to run on my aging flaky computer I might be able to squeak by until I get a new motherboard.

New user interface features added to latest Firefox 3 nightly build

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Fluxbox
Moz/FF

arstechnica: The latest Firefox 3 nightly build includes a revised interface for the download manager, which features search functionality and grouping for active and completed downloads.

True transparent eye candy on Fluxbox

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Fluxbox
HowTos

I often hear people asking how to install compiz, beryl on Fluxbox at IRC during the period when 3D desktop effects caught the crowd’s attention. And the answer is definitely NO! you can’t mix beryl with Fluxbox.

Why?

Lightweight and Customizable Windows Manager, Introducing Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

I have customized my fluxbox, I have my own set of key binding to execute programs I usually runs. I have my root menu, where I can access some programs which I do not bind on any specific key. I have my startup script which automatically load all the programs when I login. I compile my own fluxbox, and now I can’t feel comfortable without fluxbox.

Using the Fluxbox Window Manager

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Fluxbox
HowTos

I started using Linux in the pre-KDE and pre-GNOME days. These have become pretty much the de-facto graphic user interface for Linux and with good reason. I have tried them for perhaps 3 weeks to a month at a time. I had always stuck with my trusted FVWM. That was, until, out of curiosity, I tried Fluxbox.

Month with Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

Here's a desktop that happens to be a favorite of mine, and a favorite of readers too, Fluxbox. Aesthetically pleasing, minimalist, slick, simple, elegant and lean, Fluxbox is easily one of the best lightweight desktops available. Fluxbox is based around the coding, look and feel of Blackbox, a much-revered desktop of the past, but Fluxbox picks up where Blackbox left off. Adding usability enhancements, entirely new features and updating to newer standards, Fluxbox takes Blackbox into the 21st century.

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Meld is an excellent file and folder comparison tool for Windows and Linux

Ever had two sets of the same files and folders and couldn't decide which one to retain? It may take a long time to actually open each to verify the one that's recent or the one you need; while dates associated with the files may help, they won't all the time as they don't tell you anything about the actual content. This is where file comparison tools can be time-savers. Meld is an open source file comparison tool for Windows and Linux for exactly that purpose. Read more