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Slack

Eric Hameleers on Slackware

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Slack
  • Some thoughts on the recent updates in Slackware-current

    Last week, a new LTS kernel (4.9.26), new glibc (2.25) and a new gcc compiler suite (7.1.0) landed in Slackware-current. Note that gcc no longer contains the Java compiler (gcj): subsequently Slackware’s gcc-java package has been removed from slackware-current.
    We are at the head of the herd again folks. There is not yet any other distro that ships with the gcc-7 compiler by default. This will certainly pose some challenges for people who compile their stuff themselves – the SBo team warned their community about scripts that require patches to compile against gcc-7.

  • liveslak 1.1.8 and new ISO images

    Not much news of late about my ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I occasionally tweak them but the modifications these days are fairly minor. I stamped a new version on the repository this week: liveslak 1.1.8 on the occasion that I wanted to generate and upload a fresh series of Slackware-current based Live ISO images. After all, liveslak is meant to be a showcase of what Slackware-current is all about, and with the recent updates to kernel, gcc, glibc and more, a refresh was more than welcome.

  • Palemoon browser

    The Pale Moon browser was forked off the Mozilla Firefox codebase a couple of years ago, before Firefox switched to the Australis User Interface. Since then, the project has steadily been diverging from the Firefox codebase, optimizing its Gecko layout engine and rebranding that to ‘Goanna’ (which is the name of just another lizard). The community has a large vote in the direction the Pale Moon browser’s features are taking.

  • Chromium packages refreshed with v58

    I really like my new job. It is exciting, rewarding, but also demanding, and I find that I have a lot less free time at hand these days than I used to when I was with IBM. Hacking Slackware is becoming a luxury. Simply, because I realized how easily I can lose my job when an administrator puts my name in a spreadsheet… so I work my ass off and try to convince everyone that I am indispensable. Works so far.

  • Adobe Flash security update May ’17

Slackel 7.0 "Live Openbox"

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GNU
Linux
Slack

Slackel 7.0 Live Openbox has been released. Slackel is based on Slackware and Salix.

Includes the Linux kernel 4.4.38 and latest updates from Slackware's 'Current' tree.

The 64-bit iso image support booting on UEFI systems.
The 32-bit iso image support both i686 PAE SMP and i486, non-PAE capable systems.
Iso images are isohybrid
Iso images can be used as installation media.

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Slackel 7.0 Live Openbox beta1

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Slack

Slackel 7.0 Live Openbox beta1 has been released. Slackel is based on Slackware and Salix.

Includes the Linux kernel 4.4.38 and latest updates from Slackware's 'Current' tree.

The 64-bit iso image support booting on UEFI systems.
The 32-bit iso image support both i686 PAE SMP and i486, non-PAE capable systems.
Iso images are isohybrid
Iso images can be used as installation media.

Read more

Slackware Current

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Slack
  • For your Slackware-current: KDE 5_17.03 with lots of goodies

    Those of you who follow my repository RSS feeds have already noticed, but many people rely on the announcements I make on this blog (plus, I can give a lot more detail here).
    I uploaded the packages for the March 2017 release of my ‘ktown’ repository: KDE 5_17.03. Actually, there is a lot of interesting stuff going on in this release, because I decided to do some things that were on my TODO for a long while. Read more about that below in the “NEWS” section.
    What you get in this new release is: KDE Frameworks 5.32.0, Plasma 5.9.3 and Applications 16.12.3. All of this is still built on top of Qt 5.7.1.
    This Plasma 5 release targets only Slackware-current for the moment, because of the PLASMA5 Live that I release in parallel. But packages for Slackware 14.2 (only 64bit) are already being compiled at the moment, so updates will be visible in my 14.2 repository in a couple of days at most.

  • Last week’s package harvest and more

SlackEX Distro Is Based on Slackware 14.2 and KDE 4.14.27, Uses Linux 4.10.2

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After announcing the availability of a custom Linux 4.10.2 kernel for Slackware 14.2 and Slackware-based distributions like Slax, Zenwalk, and SlackEX, developer Arne Exton informs us today about the release of SlackEX Build 170314.

SlackEX Build 170314 is the latest ISO snapshot of the Slackware derivative, and, as expected, it ships with the same Linux 4.10.2 kernel that you can also download and install on your Slackware or Slackware-based operating system. The previous SlackEX Live ISO image was using a kernel from the now deprecated Linux 4.7 series.

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Slackware-Based Zenwalk Linux Gets New ISO Snapshot with GTK3 Build of Firefox

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Slack

The development team behind the Slackware-based Zenwalk GNU/Linux distribution have announced the release and general availability of a new ISO snapshot image with all the latest software versions and some exciting new features.

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Thoughts on Slackware 14.2

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Reviews
Slack

All in all I'm quite happy with slackware 14.2 on my quasi-modern computer. Old school linux and openbsd types will no doubt feel at home with slack. There's no systemd to worry about. A full install takes about 9 gigs of drive space. The slackware folks have obviously put a ton of work into this new release. A word of warning to linux newbies, this isn't the easiest distro to install and is probably best suited to linux intermediates or experts.

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Slackware News

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Slack

KDE in Slackware, Cutelyst 1.4.0 Ready

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KDE
Slack
  • KDE 5_17.02 for Slackware-current is available

    I am happy to announce my February 2017 release of the ‘ktown’ packages: KDE 5_17.02. What you get in this new release is: KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, Plasma 5.9.2 and Applications 16.12.2. All built on top of Qt 5.7.1.
    Soon, I will compile this version of Plasma 5 on Slackware 14.2 (only 64bit) as well, but I gave priority last few days to the new LibreOffice packages and a new PLASMA5 Live image. The packages that I am releasing today are for Slackware-current only (both 32bit and 64bit). As stated in my previous post, I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • New Slackware PLASMA5 Live ISO (with Plasma 5.9)

    To conclude this week’s batch of updates in my repositories I have re-generated the ISO for PLASMA5 Slackware Live Edition – it is based on liveslak 1.1.6.2 and using Slackware-current dated “Mon Feb 13 06:21:22 UTC 2017“.

    If you already use PLASMA5 Live on a USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • Cutelyst 1.4.0 released, C100K ready.

    Thanks to the last batch of improvements and with the great help of jemalloc, cutelyst-wsgi can do 100k request per second using a single thread/process on my i5 CPU. Without the use of jemalloc the rate was around 85k req/s.

    This together with the EPoll event loop can really scale your web application, initially I thought that the option to replace the default glib (on Unix) event loop of Qt had no gain, but after increasing the connection number it handle them a lot better. With 256 connections the request per second using glib event loop get’s to 65k req/s while the EPoll one stays at 90k req/s a lot closer to the number when only 32 connections is tested.

Calculate Linux Desktop 17 Cinnamon released

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GNU
Linux
Slack

Meet the new Calculate Linux Desktop with Cinnamon flavour!

Calculate Linux Desktop Cinnamon (CLDC) features a collection of Gnome 3 applications combined with the classic CL design and the OpenRC init system.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian and Derivatives

  • Glad to be a Mentor of Google Summer Code again!
    While, why I proposed this idea? Plinth is developed by Freedombox which is a Debian based project. The Freedombox is aiming for building a 100% free software self-hosting web server to deploy social applications on small machines. It provides online communication tools respecting user privacy and data ownership, replacing services provided by third-parties that under surveillance. Plinth is the front-end of Freedombox, written in Python.
  • The #newinstretch game: new forensic packages in Debian/stretch
    Debian/stretch AKA Debian 9.0 will include a bunch of packages for people interested in digital forensics. The packages maintained within the Debian Forensics team which are new in the Debian/stretch release as compared to Debian/jessie (and ignoring jessie-backports):
  • Getting ready for Stretch
    I run about 17 servers. Of those about six are very personal and the rest are a small cluster which are used for a single website. (Partly because the code is old and in some ways a bit badly designed, partly because "clustering!", "high availability!", "learning!", "fun!" - seriously I had a lot of fun putting together a fault-tolerant deployment with haproxy, ucarp, etc, etc. If I were paying for it the site would be both retired and static!)
  • Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 stable release (LTS)
    Once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you! Many of you might remember November 2014 when we announced that we were going to fork Debian. Well, we have done exactly that. It has been a long process, but now over two years later, we proudly present Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 Stable.
  • Parsix GNU/Linux Is Closing Its Doors, All Users Will Be Migrated to Debian 9
    You know we hate to give you guys bad news, but it looks like the Parsix GNU/Linux project is closing its doors in about six months after the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

OSS Leftovers

Ubuntu-Based Alternatives and Snapcraft 2.30

  • ​How to install Linux Mint on your Windows PC
    I think Linux Mint isn't just a great desktop, it's a great replacement for Windows. With Windows security problems such as WannaCry, people are starting to explore alternatives to Windows. I got a number of requests about switching out from Windows to the latest and best Linux. For me and many other experienced Linux users that's Linux Mint 18.1. You don't need to be a Linux expert to install Mint on a Windows PC. Here's how to do it.
  • Distro watch for Ubuntu lovers: What's ahead in Linux land
    With the death of Unity, Canonical will focus more attention on Ubuntu servers, Ubuntu in the cloud and Ubuntu in the so-called Internet of Things. Even if you give Canonical the benefit of the doubt - that it will continue working on desktop Ubuntu - at the very least, desktop Ubuntu's future looks uncertain. Post Unity, how will the transition to GNOME work? Will existing Unity users be "upgraded" to GNOME with 17.10? Canonical is reportedly plotting out solutions to much of this uncertainty right now, but for users, the uncertainty rules the day.
  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.30 Snappy Packaging Tool for Ubuntu Linux OSes
    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of Snapcraft 2.30, a major milestone of the open-source Snappy packaging tool used to package apps in the Snap universal binary format.

An introduction to Linux's EXT4 filesystem

Although written for Linux, the EXT filesystem has its roots in the Minix operating system and the Minix filesystem, which predate Linux by about five years, being first released in 1987. Understanding the EXT4 filesystem is much easier if we look at the history and technical evolution of the EXT filesystem family from its Minix roots. Read more