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Slackware: What's Next?

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Slack

slackblogs.blogspot: Slackware 13.37 has been proven to be a stable and secure release. But that won't stop Slackware development. So here's what i had in my mind about what should be in the next Slackware release.

Slackware 13.37 is leet, not Natty and that's how I like it.

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blog.internetnews.com: I have to admit that it has been more years than I care to remember since I last installed Slackware on my desktop.

514cKW4r3 1337 R313453d - 700 (00L Ph0R 5(|-|00L

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ostatic.com: Among all the posts announcing the release of Ubuntu 11.04 was the few that acknowledged the release of Slackware 13.37. Slackware continues to boast a loyal following because of its rock hard stability and security.

Slackware, circa 1995 versus 13.37

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usalug-org.blogspot: I got my "Linux start" with Slackware way back in 1995. I even bought my first home computer in order to do it.

Slackware 13.37 is released!

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slackware.com: It's true! Slackware 13.37 has been released. Nearly a year in the making, you will appreciate the performance and stability that can only come with careful and rigorous testing.

Slackware 13.37

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linuxaria.com: Slackware has been said to be difficult to maintain, and to work with, it has also been said that it has no package manager tool. To say the truth I was afraid of the same things the first time I installed Slackware on my old Lenovo T60, but I’ve got a big surprise.

Slackware Linux 1.0 Released

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Humor

distrowatch.com: Patrick Volkerding has announced the release of Slackware Linux 1.0, a Linux operating system for computers coming on 24 floppy disks and featuring Linux kernel 0.99pl10 with PS/2 mouse and normal hard drive support:

Something about Slackware

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linuxinsight.com: Slackware server hosting is one of the newest trends in domain hosting that is allowing many users to move from a Windows hosting platform. There are a lot of clients that are accustomed to Windows hosting, but loads of clients are seeking new hosting environments.

Slackware Linux 13.37 RC 3.1415926535897932384626433832 Released

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distrowatch.com: More fun with Slackware's version numbers as Patrick Volkerding announces the latest release candidate for the upcoming Slackware Linux 13.37:

Adventures in Linux: an Update

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Linux
Slack

genek.net: I ran Slackware for awhile. Matter of fact, I still am using Slackware for servers. I’m thinking I’ll probably stick with Slackware as my server OS, simply because it trounces absolutely everything in terms of can’t-kill-it stability… even Debian stable.

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