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Slackware (Updated and Live ISO)

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  • Multilib updates and more still to come
  • KDE 5_16.02 for Slackware-current

    I have uploaded a new ‘ktown’ package set. KDE 5_16.02 contains the latest KDE releases: Frameworks 5.19.0, Plasma 5.5.4 and Applications 15.12.2. I had been sitting on this for a few days, and was waiting for Pat to release his own new batch of updates for slackware-current. With a fresh kernel and glibc in -current and new Plasma5 packages, it is almost time to create new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. More about liveslak in the next post.

  • Beta 6 for my Live ISO images

    Yesterday I uploaded new ISO images for Slackware Live Edition, release “0.6.0“. Then I waited a bit before writing this article to allow the mirrors to catch up with the 8 GB of new files.

    Check out my previous articles about Slackware Live Edition for more background information and read the README.txt file provided with the “liveslak” sources to get a grasp on a more technical level of how this all works.

Slackware Live 0.5.1, 1.0 on Its Way

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Eric "AlienBob" Hameleers announced Slackware Live Edition 0.5.1 Saturday based on the latest Slackware 14.2 Beta. Hameleers said his livestak is "mostly complete at this point" but still lacks sufficient documentation. That's the goal for stable 1.0. For folks looking for a distro "well equipped to keep systemd out of our distro for a while" but still boots UEFI machines, perhaps Slack Live is the answer. It comes in Slackware default, Xfce, Plasma, and MATE versions, so why not book 'er up?

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Now Zenwalk 8.0 BETA 2

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Zenwalk 8.0 release is very close : BETA2 is ready now !

Beta 2 fixes several minor bugs in Zenwalk "z" serie of packages, and also provide all beta2 bugfixes at Slackware level.

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Slackware Live Edition – on its way to 1.0?

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Last week the second Beta of the upcoming Slackware 14.2 was released. My goal was to have a new Beta of my liveslak ready by that time, so that I could provide new ISO images to test the Slackware Beta2 on a live medium. Unfortunately, there was an attack of the flu in my team at work and things got a bit busier than usual. There was a plus side to this: some last moment bug fixes which could be applied to my scripts – the result of having more evenings available to test. Therefore the new release is not labeled “0.5.0” but “0.5.1”

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SlackEX Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.1 and KDE 4.14.3, Based on Slackware 14.2

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After announcing the availability of a custom Linux 4.4.1 kernel for Slackware 14.2 and derivative distributions, today Linux developer Arne Exton informs Softpedia about the release of a new build of his SlackEX GNU/Linux operating system.

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Slackware 14.2 Linux Gets a Second Beta Build, Now with Linux Kernel 4.4.1 LTS

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The Slackware community has announced that the second Beta build of the upcoming Slackware 14.2 Linux operating system is now available for download and testing from the usual channels.

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Also: Unofficial Linux Kernel 4.4.1 Available Now for Slackware 14.2 and Derivatives

Slackware on Pandora, Slackware Live Edition

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  • SlackWare 14.1 on Pandora: Everything is Awesome!

    I hope that line is not trademarked by LEGO… anyway, the point is that Slackware 14.1 on the Pandora is a great distro. I had tested it in the past but I had not given it enough of my attention then, and I now realize my mistake. Don’t get me wrong: Super Zaxxon is great and all, but if you want to enhance the utility factor of your Pandora, Slackware is one of the best ways to do it, without losing much of SZ either.

  • Slackware Live Edition, updated

    During the past weeks I have been working on my “liveslak” scripts for the Slackware Live Edition. Check out my previous articles about Beta1 Beta2 and Beta3 releases for these scripts, they contain a lot of background about the reasons for creating yet another Slackware Live, as well as instructions on the use of the Live ISO images and their boot parameters.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Arch Linux and Slackware Now Testing Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

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If you're reading the news lately, you probably know by now that Linux kernel 4.4 has been officially released and that it's the new long-term support (LTS) branch of the Linux kernel, and also the latest stable and most advanced kernel.

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More kernel/Linux:

Slackware Linux 14.2 Beta 1 Brings Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS and Pulse Audio

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Slackware Linux, a complete 32-bit and 64-bit multitasking "UNIX-like" system that is currently based around the 4.4 Linux kernel series, has been upgraded to version 14.2 Beta 1 and is now ready for download.

Slackware Linux is probably the oldest Linux distribution that’s still being maintained, and it managed to keep the same kind of development model for a very long time. There are no official repos and most of the changes, fixes, and new features are added by its creator, Patrick Volkerding.

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SlackEX Linux Distro Is Based on Slackware 14.1, Runs Linux Kernel 4.3.1 and KDE4

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We've reported earlier today, December 12, that an unofficial Linux 4.3.1 kernel package was made available by GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton for the Slackware 14.1 operating system and its derivatives.

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More in Tux Machines


  • New features in GNOME To Do
    Some of you might have noticed that GNOME To Do wasn’t released with GNOME 3.22. There is a reason for that: I didn’t have enough time to add new features, or fix any bugs. But that changed, and in fact big things happened.
  • CUDA 8, cuDNN, Nvidia drivers and GNOME Software metadata
    The Nvidia driver repository has been updated with AppStream metadata. From Fedora 25 onward, you will be able to search for Nvidia, CUDA, GeForce or Quadro to make the driver, control panel and other programs appear in the Gnome Software window. As far as I know, this should be enabled by default on Fedora 25.
  • Builder Rust
    With Federico’s wonderful post on Rust’ifying librsvg I guess it makes sense to share what I’ve been doing the last couple of days. I’ve been keeping my eye on Rust for quite a while. However, I’ve been so heads down with Builder the last two years that I haven’t really gotten to write any or help on integration into our platform. Rust appears to take a very pragmatic stance on integration with systems code (which is primarily C). The C calling convention is not going anywhere, so at some point, you will be integrating with some part of a system that is “C-like”. Allowing us to piecemeal upgrade the “Safety” of our systems is much smarter than rewrite-the-universe. This pragmatism is likely due to the realities of Rust’s birth at Mozilla. It’s a huge code-base, and incrementally modernizing it is the only reality that is approachable.
  • Librsvg gets Rusty
    I've been wanting to learn Rust for some time. It has frustrated me for a number of years that it is quite possible to write GNOME applications in high-level languages, but for the libraries that everything else uses ("the GNOME platform"), we are pretty much stuck with C. Vala is a very nice effort, but to me it never seemed to catch much momentum outside of GNOME. After reading this presentation called "Rust out your C", I got excited. It *is* possible to port C code to Rust, small bits at a time! You rewrite some functions in Rust, make them linkable to the C code, and keep calling them from C as usual. The contortions you need to do to make C types accessible from Rust are no worse than for any other language.

Leftovers: Software

  • Rblpapi 0.3.5
    A new release of Rblpapi is now on CRAN. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg Labs (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required).
  • Flatpak 0.6.13
    These used to take an application id and an optional branch name as two arguments. This meant you could not specify multiple apps to install in a single command. So, instead of having the branch as a separate argument we now support partial references. If you only specify an id we try to match the rest as best we can depending on what is installed/available, but if this matches multiple things you have to specify more details.
  • New features on Hosted Weblate
    Today, new version has been deployed on Hosted Weblate. It brings many long requested features and enhancements.
  • A Wild Desktop Reddit App for Linux Appears
    Reddit is …Well it’s Reddit: there’s little else like it on the internet. Thos of us who use Reddit probably do so a tab, in a browser, because that’s how the site works best. Many desktop Reddit apps exist, but few translate the unique experience of using the service to the desktop in a way that really works.
  • Opera 41 Browser Brings Performance Improvements
    For those still using the Opera web-browser, Opera 41 is now available as the latest stable release and seems primarily focused on performance improvements.
  • Faster and better browsing – Welcome Opera 41
    We all know the feeling. You want to check out your favorite website, but when you open your laptop or turn on your computer, you realize the browser is closed. You click on the browser icon and then have to wait while the browser opens all your previously opened sites… We have a solution for you that makes your browsing faster: Opera 41 includes a new, smarter startup sequence that cuts away almost all the wait time, no matter how many tabs you open on startup.

today's howtos

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • We Got Phished
    She logged into her account but couldn’t find the document and, with other more urgent emails to deal with, she quickly moved on and put this brief event out of mind. This staff member will henceforth be known as PZ, or “patient zero.” The login page wasn’t really a login page. It was a decoy webpage, designed to look legitimate in order to trick unsuspecting recipients into typing in their private login credentials. Having fallen for the ruse, PZ had effectively handed over her email username and password to an unknown party outside the Exploratorium. This type of attack is known as “phishing.” Much like putting a lure into a lake and waiting to see what bites, a phishing attack puts out phony prompts, such as a fake login page, hoping that unwitting recipients can be manipulated into giving up personal information.
  • DDoS attacks against Dyn the work of 'script kiddies'
    Last week's distributed denial of service attack in the US against domain name services provider Dynamic Network Services are more likely to have been the work of "script kiddies", and not state actors. Security researchers at threat intelligence firm Flashpoint dismissed reports that linked the attack to WikiLeaks, the Russian government or the New World Hackers group. Instead, Flashpoint said, it was "moderately confident" that the Hackforums community was behind the attack which led to well-known sites like Twitter, Spotify, Netflix and Paypal being inaccessible on 21 October (US time).
  • How one rent-a-botnet army of cameras, DVRs caused Internet chaos
    Welcome to the Internet of Evil Things. The attack that disrupted much of the Internet on October 21 is still being teased apart by investigators, but evidence thus far points to multiple "botnets" of Internet-connected gadgets being responsible for blocking access to the Domain Name Service (DNS) infrastructure at DNS provider Dyn. Most of these botnets—coordinated armies of compromised devices that sent malicious network traffic to their targets—were controlled by Mirai, a self-spreading malware for Internet of Things (IoT) devices. in a blog post on the attack, Dyn reported "tens of millions" of devices were involved in the attack But other systems not matching the signature of Mirai were also involved in the coordinated attack on Dyn. "We believe that there might be one or more additional botnets involved in these attacks," Dale Drew, CSO of Level 3 Communications, told Ars. "This could mean that they are 'renting' several different botnets to launch an attack against a specific victim, in which multiple other sites have been impacted." The motive may have been blackmail, since the attacker sought a payout by Dyn to stop. But Drew warned that the huge disruption caused by the attack "could result in large copycat attacks, and [a] higher [number of] victim payouts [so] as to not be impacted in the same way. It could also be a signal that the bad guy is using multiple botnets in order to better avoid detection since they are not orchestrating the attack from a single botnet source."
  • ARM builds up security in the tiniest Internet of Things chips
    IoT is making devices smaller, smarter, and – we hope – safer. It’s not easy to make all those things happen at once, but chips that can help are starting to emerge. On Tuesday at ARM TechCon in Silicon Valley, ARM will introduce processors that are just a fraction of a millimeter across and incorporate the company’s TrustZone technology. TrustZone is hardware-based security built into SoC (system on chip) processors to establish a root of trust. It’s designed to prevent devices from being hacked and taken over by intruders, a danger that’s been in the news since the discovery of the Mirai botnet, which recently took over thousands of IP cameras to mount denial-of-service attacks.
  • Antique Kernel Flaw Opens Door to New Dirty Cow Exploit