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Slack

KDE: KWave and Plasma in Slackware

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KDE
Slack
  • Replacing Audacity with KWave

    KWave has been developed since 1998, yet few have heard of it. I only recently heard of it myself from writer and podcaster Marcel Gagné while I was setting up to do how-to-videos. Part of the reason for its obscurity might be that, despite its name, it only recently become an official KDE project in the last release. However, the major reason for its obscurity is probably that it has been overshadowed by the better-known Audacity — which is a pity, because in most ways, KWave is every bit as useful as an audio editor.

    Why would anyone want an Audacity substitute? For one thing, while Audacity is cross-platform, it is not well-integrated into Linux. Audacity handles its own resources, as you can tell by its lengthy load time. Often, Audacity frequently gives confusing options for input and playback sources, giving several names to the same device and offering irrelevant front and back options for mono devices, so that users can only find the one they need through trial and error. Sometimes, the necessary option for a particular source can change for no apparent each time Audacity starts.

  • October updates for the Slackware Plasma5 desktop

    There’s been updates to all the major components of the KDE Software Collection (I know they stopped using that name but I think it is still fitting). So I tasked my build box to compile hundreds of new packages and today I have for you the October ’17 set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current. KDE 5_17.10 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.39.0, Plasma 5.11.0 and Applications 17.08.2. All based on Qt 5.9.2 for Slackware-current and Qt 5.7.1 for Slackware 14.2.

Refreshed ISO’s for Slackware Live Edition, and more

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Slack

When I released new Live ISO images almost two weeks ago, a bug in the init script which became apparent with the latest Slackware initrd broke the encrypted /home feature. Therefore I am releasing an updated set of ‘liveslak‘ scripts with version 1.1.9.1 .

The latest set of Slackware Live Edition ISOs are based on liveslak 1.1.9.1 and Slackware-current dated “Fri Sep 29 22:58:54 UTC 2017“). That means, the new Live ISOs contain the updates to TexLive and Python3 (well, no texlive in the XFCE image due to its size limit of course).

If you already use a Slackware Live USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content. If you want to modify other parameters of your USB stick, use the script “upslak.sh“. It’s main feature is that it can update the kernel on the USB stick, but it also can replace the Live init script. As with most (if not all) of my scripts, use the “-h” parameter to get help on its functionality.

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Slackware-Based SlackEX Distro Updated with Linux Kernel 4.12, KDE 4.14.35 LTS

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Slack

After informing us of the release of his CruxEX 3.3 2017 GNU/Linux distribution, developer Arne Exton recently brought to our attention that his SlackEX distro got a new important update.

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Slackware Security and Windows Insecurity

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Microsoft
Security
Slack
  • OpenJDK7 and Flash Player security updates (Aug ’17)

    On the blog of IcedTea release manager Andrew Hughes (aka GNU/Andrew) you can find the announcement for IcedTea 2.6.11 which builds OpenJDK 7u151_b01. This release includes the official July 2017 security fixes for Java 7. Note that the security updates for Java 8 were already pushed to my repository some time ago.

  • Kremlin's hackers 'wield stolen NSA exploit to spy on hotel guests in Europe, Mid East'

    Miscreants are using various techniques, including the leaked NSA EternalBlue exploit also wielded by the WannaCry malware, to hack into laptops and other devices used by government and business travelers, FireEye researchers declared on Friday.

It's Now Possible to Install the Linux 4.13 RC2 Kernel on Your Slackware Distro

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Linux
Slack

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is known for creating and maintaining a bunch of Linux-based operating systems, as well as for packaging the latest kernels for Slackware Linux.

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Netrunner, Slackware and Debian Updates

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Slack
Debian
  • Netrunner Rolling 2017.07 released

    The Netrunner Team is happy to announce the release of Netrunner Rolling 2017.07 – 64bit ISO.

  • July 17 updates – Plasma 5, Live ISOS and more

    To celebrate I have created some goodies for you. Nothing you can eat or drink…

    First, Plasma 5 updates.

    I have uploaded the July ’17 set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current to the ‘ktown’ repository. KDE 5_17.07 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.36.0, Plasma 5.10.3 and Applications 17.04.3. All based on Qt 5.9.0 for Slackware-current and Qt 5.7.1 for Slackware 14.2.

  • Calibre and rar support

    Thanks to the cooperation with upstream authors and the maintainer Martin Pitt, the Calibre package in Debian is now up-to-date at version 3.4.0, and has adopted a more standard packaging following upstream. In particular, all the desktop files and man pages have been replaced by what is shipped by Calibre. What remains to be done is work on RAR support.

Slackware Turns 24 Years Old

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Slack

Today marks 24 years since the original release of Slackware, which continues to be led by Patrick Volkerding. Slackware releases are much more infrequent these days with the last official release being Slackware 14.2 from June of last year and before that was Slackware 14.1 in 2013. But development on Slackware does continue and its rolling-release code is currently on the Linux 4.9 LTS kernel and has many new packages compared to the v14.2 release.

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EFF Appeals EME Travesty, Slackware Developer Weighs In

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Slack
Web
  • Encrypted Media Extensions on the World Wide Web

    Before I continue, I want you to fully realize that with Slackware Linux, your rights are not taken away. You are free to use – or not use – technologies that allow you to watch “protected” content like Netflix videos. Our browsers will work just as well if you choose not to use DRM technologies. The libraries which implement the DRM layer are separate from the Slackware packages containing the browsers (Firefox, Chromium) and are not distributed with the OS. It is up to you to add DRM extensions if you need them. You are and remain in control of your OS.

  • [Older] Amid Unprecedented Controversy, W3C Greenlights DRM for the Web [Ed: see "I know this isn't specifically Linux related, but I'm shocked we're not talking about this already."]
  • EFF has appealed the W3C's decision to make DRM for the web without protections

    Five days ago, the World Wide Web Consortium announced that it would go ahead with its project of making DRM for web-video, and that the Director, Tim Berners-Lee had overruled or decided not to act further on all objections about the dangers this posed to legitimate and important activities including security audits, accessibility adaptation and competition.

    The W3C has an appeals process, which has never been successfully used in W3C history. If 5 percent of the members appeal a decision by the Director, all members are entitled to vote, and if there's a majority in favor of overulling the Director, the decision is unmade.

  • Global Web standard for integrating DRM into browsers hits a snag

    Days ago, Ars reported on a controversial decision by the industry trade group that oversees the global development of Web standards. The decision by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to back a standard for implementing digital rights management (DRM) for Web-based content is now under appeal, the Electronic Frontier Foundation announced Wednesday.

Newly-Built Software for Slackware

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Slack
  • What if gcc 7 gives you headaches?

    In Slackware-current we use version 7.1.0 of the gcc compiler suite. These advanced compilers can sometimes be quite a bit more strict about what they accept as valid code. As a consequence, you will regularly run into compilation issues with software. Not just the software made with the scripts on slackbuilds.org, but also some of the software in the Slackware core distribution requires patches in order to get them to compile.

    Until now, I have been lucky to find the patches I needed in the repositories of other distributions, or else developers patched their software themselves. But there will be corner cases where solutions and patches are not readily found, or the developers will simply not support gcc 7. Pale Moon is such a piece of software where the developers recommend compiling with gcc 4.x or as a last resort, gcc 5.

  • Plasma 5 for Slackware – June release

    Slackware64 14.2 users will have to wait another day, but I have uploaded my latest set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware-current to the ‘ktown’ repository. KDE 5_17.06 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.35.0, Plasma 5.10.2 and Applications 17.04.2. I based this new release on Qt 5.9.0 (at least for Slackware-current… for 14.2 I will stick to Qt 5.7.1).
    NOTE: I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • LibreOffice 5.3.4 packages for -current

    When looking for package updates in preparation for a new Slackware Live PLASMA5 edition, I noticed that the Document Foundation had released LibreOffice 5.3.4 without updating their blog with the news – it’s only mentioned on the download page.
    I have built and uploaded Slackware-current packages for libreoffice-5.3.4. If you are on Slackware 14.2 you will probably have to skip this one, as I will not have time for compiling packages the coming weeks (allocates one virtual machine for one day per build, since I can only check on progress in the evenings).
    The package for -current needed to be (re-)built anyway because of the library issue with Slackware’s updated libGLEW which prevented Impress to start.

Slackware Packages and Security Fixes

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Slack
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More in Tux Machines

Software: Storage Software, Flatpak, Checkra1n, LibreOffice 7.0 and Crust

  • List Of Open Source Cloud Storage Software For Linux In 2020

    Insight: List Of Open Source Cloud Storage Software For Linux In 2020 Let’s have a look into the list of best and open-source cloud storage software for Linux in 2020. Bookmark out the post for future reference.

  • Flatpak 1.6.1 Released Due To Security Issue - Special Case Of Getting Access Outside Home

    Flatpak 1.6 was an exciting update for this Linux application sandboxing/distribution tech in that it started laying the foundation to support a paid app store but elsewhere in the code-base a security issue came about.

  • Checkra1n Jailbreak for Linux Nearing Completion, Could Release Soon

    Checkra1n co-developer Nikias Bassen or @pimskeks shared on Twitter the exciting news that the Linux version of the exploit is nearing completion and will be released soon rather than later. Henceforth, the jailbreak community now has something to look forward to. In addition, if you're looking to use the Checkra1n jailbreak for Linux, you will have to wait sometime before Nullcon in March.

  • LibreOffice 7.0 Is The Version Now In Development With Its Skia + Vulkan Support

    LibreOffice 6.4 is set to be released in the coming days while succeeding that will now be LibreOffice 7.0. LibreOffice 6.4.0 should be out over the next week with various user-interface improvements, performance improvements within the Calc spreadsheet software, a QR code generator, faster compilation support, dropping the GTK2 VCL plug-in, various import/export filter improvements, and much more. See the in-progress 6.4 release notes for more details on this exciting update for this free software office suite.

  • Crust Now Available On Univention Corporate Server

    With the addition of Crust in the Univention App Center, UCS users can easily add the entire Crust suite to their UCS instances. This includes Crust Compose for Low Code Development and End-to-End Business Automation, Crust CRM, Crust Service Cloud for Customer Support and Service Automation, Crust Enterprise Messaging, a self-hosted messenger for secure communication within your enterprise and Crust Corredor, for automating repeating tasks with End-to-End Business Automation.

Programming Leftovers

  • 6 things you should be doing with Emacs

    Imagine using Python's IDLE interface to edit text. You would be able to load files into memory, edit them, and save changes. But every action you perform would be defined by a Python function. Making a word all capitals, for instance, calls upper(), opening a file calls open, and so on. Everything in your text document is a Python object and can be manipulated accordingly. From the user's perspective, it's the same experience as any text editor. For a Python developer, it's a rich Python environment that can be changed and developed with just a few custom functions in a config file. This is what Emacs does for the 1958 programming language Lisp. In Emacs, there's no separation between the Lisp engine running the application and the arbitrary text you type into it. To Emacs, everything is Lisp data, so everything can be analyzed and manipulated programmatically. That makes for a powerful user interface (UI). But if you're a casual Emacs user, you may only be scratching the surface of what it can do for you. Here are six things you may not have realized you could do with Emacs.

  • Intersecting Intel & AMD Instruction Set Extensions

    In some of my projects, I’ve recently had the need to utilize FMA (fused-multiply-add) or AVX instructions. Compiling C/C++ on X86_64 will by default only activate MXX and a few of the early SSE extensions. The utilized instruction set basically predates the core2 which was introduced in 2006. Math instructions and vectorizations can greatly benefit from more modern instructions like SSE4*, FMA, AVX, AVX2, etc, but because of the way the -march compiler option works, those are not easily enabled for all CPU types of similar age.

  • Intel Continues Improving Its SYCL Stack - Now Supports Ahead-Of-Time Compilation

    The Khronos SYCL standard as a single-source C++-based programming model for OpenCL is one of the exciting elements for Intel's GPU compute plans with the forthcoming Xe graphics cards and fits into their oneAPI umbrella. They just released their SYCL Compiler and Runtimes 2019-12 release with numerous updates. First up this new version of their SYCL compiler/run-time features opencl-aot as a new tool for offering ahead-of-time compilation of SYCL sources. The AoT compilation tool is geared for generating device-dependent OpenCL program binaries optimized out of SPIR-V. The optimized binaries are catered for Intel's architecture.

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Fortran

    The language is designed to be simple to understand, yet retains the efficiency in execution as assembly language – about 80% as efficient as assembly/machine code. Fortran is machine independent, and a problem oriented language. It is often used in the scientific community, particularly among physicists, and is designed for scientific numerical computing. Fortran allows for high parallelization, it’s easy to optimize, and lends itself particularly well to computationally intensive fields such as finite element analysis, numerical weather prediction, computational physics, computational chemistry, and computational fluid dynamics. Fortran has evolved over time, with various standards including Fortran IV, Fortran 77, Fortran 90 and Fortran 95. More recent revisions are Fortran 2003, and Fortran 2008. Since Fortran 9x, it has many structured programming features, dynamic memory, operator overloading, and primitive objects. It is both the language of the past, the current, and the future (high-performance computing is unlikely to cast aside Fortran). Despite its age, Fortran is still very much alive and kicking. Fortran has a vast number of libraries of code.

  • k-means: a brief interlude into Data Wrangling

    When last we saw our heroes, what they thought was the brink of success turned out to be the precipice of hasty interpretation and now they are dangling for dear life on the branch of normalization! how's that for tortured metaphor! If you use raw values for your k-means clustering, dimensions with large values or large ranges can swamp smaller dimensions and skew your clusters. The process of normalization tries to bring everything into the same range, usually [0,1], although your choices on how to transform the ranges are also significant. There is not always one best way to do it and, as usual, get familiar with your dataset and use your judgement.

  • Paws XXXXIX (Very Close)

    Finally things were looking my way. I plowed thought the remaining CloudFront actions and got them all to work without any more changes to Paws. In the end I checked in 30+ new tests cases and over 2k of tests the other day. So I can safely say that 'CloudFront' is fully operational. That leaves only 'Route53' to look and for me this is somewhat problematic. The Route53 api deals with 'Domains', 'Checks', 'Hosts', 'Traffic' and such.

  • String Formatting with Python 3's f-Strings

    Python 3.6 introduced a new way to format strings: f-Strings. It is faster than other string formatting methods in Python, and they allow us to evaluate Python expressions inside a string. In this post, we'll look at the various ways we can format strings in Python. Then we'll have a deeper look at f-Strings, looking at how we can use it when displaying different data.

  • Massive change of file extension (bash)

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu’s Installer Slideshow Gets a Focal Refresh

Ubuntu’s installer slideshow isn’t something most of us spend an awful time looking at but for new users it serves an important educational goal. The Ubiquity desktop installer plays a slideshow during the main part of the install process. Each slide highlights a key feature or important function available in Ubuntu (or whichever Ubuntu flavour is being installed). The slideshow has been a staple part of Ubuntu (and many flavours) since it was introduced back in Ubuntu 10.10. For the upcoming release of Ubuntu 20.04 the look of the slideshow will better match the look of Yaru, Ubuntu’s default GTK theme (which recently got a big update of its own). Read more