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Slack

514cKW4r3 1337 R313453d - 700 (00L Ph0R 5(|-|00L

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Slack

ostatic.com: Among all the posts announcing the release of Ubuntu 11.04 was the few that acknowledged the release of Slackware 13.37. Slackware continues to boast a loyal following because of its rock hard stability and security.

Slackware, circa 1995 versus 13.37

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Slack

usalug-org.blogspot: I got my "Linux start" with Slackware way back in 1995. I even bought my first home computer in order to do it.

Slackware 13.37 is released!

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Slack

slackware.com: It's true! Slackware 13.37 has been released. Nearly a year in the making, you will appreciate the performance and stability that can only come with careful and rigorous testing.

Slackware 13.37

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Slack

linuxaria.com: Slackware has been said to be difficult to maintain, and to work with, it has also been said that it has no package manager tool. To say the truth I was afraid of the same things the first time I installed Slackware on my old Lenovo T60, but I’ve got a big surprise.

Slackware Linux 1.0 Released

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Slack
Humor

distrowatch.com: Patrick Volkerding has announced the release of Slackware Linux 1.0, a Linux operating system for computers coming on 24 floppy disks and featuring Linux kernel 0.99pl10 with PS/2 mouse and normal hard drive support:

Something about Slackware

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Slack

linuxinsight.com: Slackware server hosting is one of the newest trends in domain hosting that is allowing many users to move from a Windows hosting platform. There are a lot of clients that are accustomed to Windows hosting, but loads of clients are seeking new hosting environments.

Slackware Linux 13.37 RC 3.1415926535897932384626433832 Released

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distrowatch.com: More fun with Slackware's version numbers as Patrick Volkerding announces the latest release candidate for the upcoming Slackware Linux 13.37:

Adventures in Linux: an Update

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Linux
Slack

genek.net: I ran Slackware for awhile. Matter of fact, I still am using Slackware for servers. I’m thinking I’ll probably stick with Slackware as my server OS, simply because it trounces absolutely everything in terms of can’t-kill-it stability… even Debian stable.

Get Slack!

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Slack

go2linux.org: If you follow this blog, you know that I’ve been using Slackware for more or less three months now, Slackware as you may already know is the oldest surviving Linux distribution.

Review: Slackware 13.1

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Slack

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: I never envisioned myself trying out any of the more advanced distributions like Slackware, Arch, or Gentoo, but having tried derivatives like GNU/Linux Utopia, Chakra, and Sabayon, I think I'm ready to try Slackware and Arch.

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