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Slack

Review: Slackware 13.1

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Slack

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: I never envisioned myself trying out any of the more advanced distributions like Slackware, Arch, or Gentoo, but having tried derivatives like GNU/Linux Utopia, Chakra, and Sabayon, I think I'm ready to try Slackware and Arch.

The Slacker’s Fav Linux List

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Linux
Slack

lockergnome.com: Here’s what I like. They’re all good. However, like anyone, I have my personal favorites. Here goes… My Top Five GNU/Linux Operating Systems and Why

Slackware review

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Slack

go2linux.org: One of the most common statements about Slackware is that, it is difficult to maintain, and not user friendly. This is only partially true and depends on what is easy for you.

Slackware Linux 13.1

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Slack

zdnet.co.uk/blogs: The latest stable release, 13.1, came out at the end of May - I'm a bit ashamed to say that it has taken me this long to get around to installing it. It is (of course) available in 32- and 64-bit versions, on an ISO DVD or 6 ISO CDs.

A look at Slackware 13.0

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technologytales.com: I recall a fellow university student using it in the mid/late 1990′s. Since then, my exploration took me into Redhat, SuSE, Mandrake and eventually to Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora. All of that bypassed Slackware so it was to give the thing a look.

Spotlight on Linux: Slackware Linux 13.1

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linuxjournal.com: People sometimes ask which distribution to try if they want to learn how Linux works. Common answers are Gentoo, Arch, or Debian. However, I disagree. Each of these distros teach users their particular brand of Linux. There's only one truly pure Linux, and that is Slackware.

Slackware Linux 13.1 arrives

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slackware.com: Yes, it's that time again! After many months of development and careful testing, we are proud to announce the release of Slackware version 13.1!

Slackware Linux 13.1 screenshots

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zdnet.com.au: If you've grown tired of all the hand-holding utilities in Ubuntu or Fedora, then look no further than Slackware.

Slackage Management, Baby!

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lockergnome.com: There are those who say that Slackware Linux doesn’t really have a package manager. BAH! I say. It has two package management systems, actually.

Get Slack!

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Slack

lockergnome.com: Like most X-MS Windows users, I did not come to Slackware directly. I took a round-about route through a few other distributions first.

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