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Slack

Zenwalk 8.0 Is Based on Slackware 14.2, Gets New Desktop Layout for Xfce 4.12.1

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Slack

Jean-Philippe Guillemin, the developer of Zenwalk, proudly announced today, July 2, 2016, the final release of the Slackware-based Zenwalk 8.0 GNU/Linux operating system.

Based on the just released Slackware 14.2 operating system, Zenwalk 8.0 is finally here, powered by Linux kernel 4.4.14 LTS, the same one that powers the monumental Slackware Linux, thus offering users support for the latest hardware devices. Zenwalk's default desktop environment is Xfce 4.12.1, and it now ships with a new layout that's more user-friendly than ever.

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Slackware Release Announcement

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Slackware 14.2 brings many updates and enhancements, among which
you'll find two of the most advanced desktop environments available
today: Xfce 4.12.1, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and
easy to use desktop environment, and KDE 4.14.21 (KDE 4.14.3 with
kdelibs-4.14.21) a stable release of the 4.14.x series of the award-
winning KDE desktop environment. These desktops utilize eudev, udisks,
and udisks2, and many of the specifications from freedesktop.org which
allow the system administrator to grant use of various hardware devices
according to users' group membership so that they will be able to use
items such as USB flash sticks, USB cameras that appear like USB storage,
portable hard drives, CD and DVD media, MP3 players, and more, all
without requiring sudo, the mount or umount command. Just plug and play.
Slackware's desktop should be suitable for any level of Linux experience.

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Zenwalk 8.0 final release candidate - RC2

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Slack

This pre-release ISO should be at 99% the stable target, you will get latest Libreoffice 5.1.3, latest Chromium 51, Mplayer 1.3, ffmpeg 3.0.1, latest Slackware current system (many upstream packages updated) featuring the Linux kernel 4.4.13, and a new desktop layout for XFCE 4.12.

Lately, system tools have been heavily improved to fully integrate Policykit privileges elevation features, enabling the unprivileged user to tweak many system parameters that require root ownership : you can now change your user password from the XFCE Panel by just entering your previous password, you can set the Xorg keyboard layout without root privileges, set your locale, set the login manager settings, set system clock, etc...). All these features can of course be hardened with Policykit to disallow automatic privileges elevation for users.

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Salix Xfce 14.2 Now in Beta, Will Be Based on Slackware Linux 14.2 and Xfce 4.12

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GNU
Linux
Slack

The Salix Xfce 14.2 GNU/Linux operating system is in development, and it looks like a public Beta version has just been released into the wild, allowing the community to see what's coming in the Slackware-based OS.

Salix Xfce 14.2 Beta 1 arrives on June 15, 2016, three months after the Alpha milestone, bringing many enhancements and new features, among which we can mention an improved boot menu that lets users choose in which language to install Salix, and a boot prompt is no longer available on the ISO image.

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Also: KDE 5_16.06 for Slackware -current

Slackware Live Edition 1.1.0 comes with the latest Plasma5 on ISO

SlackBuilds.org Turns 10

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  • 10th Anniversary of SBo Project

    I started to use Slackware in 2005 when i couldn't get Mandriva 2005 working properly on my first laptop (Acer Travelmate). The installation went well, but it always ended in a kernel panic situation. I described them on my first post to this blog in 2006 (took me several months to decide to make a new blog that discuss my daily live with Slackware). I used Slackware 10.2 at that time.

  • Ten years of SlackBuilds.org

    Many of us will remember the time when a true Slacker did not bother herself with build scripts. The “configure && make && make install” mantra was at the forefront of everyone’s mind when it came to installing new software. Slackware made this possible. Unlike the other big distros, the Slackware package management did (and does!) not get in your way. If you want to compile your software by hand, bypassing the package management ‘database’ (which in Slackware is nothing more than a directory), then nothing or no one is stopping you.

Slackware News

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  • KDE 5_16.05 for Slackware -current

    While everyone is waiting for the 14.2 release of our beloved Slackware Linux distribution, those pesky developers keep releasing their own software. So this was the week where KDE Frameworks, Plasma and Applications all had newer versions than I have in my repository. Guess what – I have prepared a new set of Plasma5 packages for the month of May so that I am ready for a new Live ISO… next Slackware release or not.

  • Updates for LibreOffice, Chromium, Calibre, QBittorrent, Veracrypt
  • Stable 1.0.0 release of liveslak

    Yesterday on the final day of my short holiday (of sorts) I prepped and released version 1.0.0 of my “liveslak” project. It is stable and the bugs that were reported (plus some more) have been taken care of.

    The “1.0.0” marker is not the end of its development of course. It means that I consider the project production-ready. It will be used to create Live Editions of Slackware 14.2 (64bit and 32bit) when that is released. There’s still some more ideas for liveslak that I want to implement and those will become available as 1.x releases.

Slackware-Based Porteus 3.2 to Ship with Linux Kernel 4.5.3, RC2 Out for Testing

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The Porteus Linux development team announced today, May 8, 2016, the immediate availability for download of the second RC (Release Candidate) build for the upcoming Porteus 3.2 operating system.

To be honest, we had no idea that the development cycle of Porteus 3.2 has started, as there was no official announcement for a first Release Candidate build, so we're as surprised as you are to see today the release of Porteus 3.2 RC2, which comes one and a half years after the previous version, Porteus 3.1, announced in the first week of December 2014.

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Slackware News

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Slack
  • Chromium turns 50 (where’s the cake)

    So reserving time to compile the 32bit package for chromium took a while. And remember, even though I can still provide a 32bit Chromium browser, Google has ceased providing a 32bit version of their own Chrome browser – which means, no more updates to the 32bit PepperFlash and Widevine plugins.

  • Icedtea 3.0.0 brings Java 8 to Slackware

    Finally! IcedTea 3.0.0 has been released and it compiles OpenJDK 8u77.

    Java 8 has been available for considerable time, but I have been waiting for icedtea to support it before creating packages. According to release maintainer Andrew Hughes the main cause for this delay was having to start from scratch due to the new build system and basically lack of time.

  • Slackware 14.2 RC2 Now Available

Zenwalk 8.0 RC1 is hopefully the final release candidate

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Slack

Following the Slackware hopefully final release candidate, here we are for Zenwalk 8.0 RC1.

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Slackware Linux 14.2 Final Release Imminent as Second RC Build Goes Live

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Slackware developer Patrick Volkerding has rolled out the second RC (Release Candidate) version of Slackware 14.2 to early adopters with a clear indication that this new build is likely to become the final shipping version of the anticipated Linux OS.

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