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Slack

Slackware-Based Salix Openbox 14.1 Beta 1 Is Out and Ready for Testing

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Slack

Salix Openbox 14.1 Beta 1, a GNU/Linux distribution based on Slackware that is simple, fast, easy to use, and based on the Openbox window manager, has been released and is now available for download.

The Openbox version of Salix has been released has arrived and it’s pretty similar with the previous flavors that have been made available until now in this branch. This window manager is a very light one, which means that it can run on low-end hardware and on old computers.

“The 32-bit iso image includes both SMP (multiple processor capable) and non-SMP (single processor) kernels. The non-SMP kernel is mostly intended for machines that can’t run the SMP kernel, which is anything older than a Pentium III, and some models of the Pentium M that don’t support PAE.”

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Slackware Release Announcement [14.1]

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Slack

Yes, it is that time again! After well over a year of planning, development, and testing, the Slackware Linux Project is proud to announce the latest stable release of the longest running distribution of the Linux operating system, Slackware version 14.1!

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Slackware 14.1 on Its Way

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Slack

ostatic.com: Just when we needed some exciting development news Patrick Volkerding declared Current Beta, 14.1 is officially on its way! Distrowatch.com's top-secret webcrawler found the tidbit in this morning's changelog.

Slackware Turns 20

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Linux
Slack

ostatic.com: Slackware Linux turned 20 years old yesterday and no one gave them a party. Even I, who commonly remembered the illustrious distribution's birthdays in my now former column, had to be reminded by LWN. Well, that won't do.

Ten reasons to choose Slackware Linux

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Slack

kikinovak.net: This summer, the Slackware Linux distribution will celebrate its twentieth anniversary. Here's a list of ten reasons why Slackware is still the perfect choice.

Slackpkg Update Fixes Long Standing Annoyance

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Slack

ostatic.com: Slackware's Slackpkg has long had a design flaw that could result in inoperative applications or systems. But Patrick Volkerding recently addressed the issue with a simple but significant change.

Will there ever be a perfect operating system?

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OS
Linux
Slack
SUSE
  • Will there ever be a perfect operating system?
  • Running Slackware-Current
  • OpenSuSE 12.3 – the Cheater
  • elementary OS 0.2 review - Uphill
  • Review: Fuduntu 2013.2
  • North by (Linux Fest) Northwest
  • Fedora 19 Alpha Version Arrives
  • This week in rawhide 2013-04-23 edition
  • Mandriva Business Server gets updates
  • Lightweight openSUSE: LXDE Desktop From Scratch
  • Fedora 19 Sneak Peek
  • ROSA ABF 2.0
  • Release date for Wheezy announced
  • Manjaro: A Convenient Way To Play With Arch

Linux Potpourri: Slack Current, KDELyteDEsktop, and Sabayon systemd

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KDE
Linux
Slack

ostatic.com: I've gotten a bit behind the last few days and here are a few items I wanted to report about. Patrick Volkerding says Slackware Current is too current. Will Stephenson is developing a lighter KDE desktop. And Sabayon has implemented systemd.

Slackel 14.0: Slackware 14 further simplified!

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Linux
Slack

mylinuxexplore.blogspot: I tried using Slackware, 5 years back, when my Linux experience was still at infancy. I remember looking for a Linux distro to install and downloaded Slackware - but had a nightmare installing it and making it work! Slackel 14 - does it make using and installing Slackware easier?

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More in Tux Machines

How Google Does Open Source

Marc Merlin has been working as an engineer at Google since 2002 and has seen (and done) a lot of open source and Linux work during that time. Speaking at the LinuxCon North America event this week, Merlin provided a standing room only audience with an overview how Google uses and contributes to open source. "Google wouldn't be around today without open source software," Merlin said. Read more

High-end music player has a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian inside

Bryston has launched a high-end, compact “BDP-π” digital music player built on a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, plus a HifiBerry “Digi+” audio HAT add-on. Bryston’s new Raspberry Pi-based BDP-π digital music player costs a hefty $1,295. Yet that’s less than half the cost of the highly acclaimed Bryston BDP-2 player, while offering many of these same features and much of the same high-end sound quality. The BDP-π is faster and more capable than the BDP-1, says the company. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming (Mighty No. 9 and Wine)

  • “Mighty No. 9” Mac & Linux Versions Released on Steam
    The creators of the Kickstarter-funded video game, Mighty No. 9, announced on Thursday they released the Mac and Linux versions of the game. This announcement comes just a little over two months after the game was delivered to North American and Asian backers via PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The team revealed that both Mac and Linux versions are now available on Steam.
  • Mac and Linux Versions of Mighty No. 9 Released
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.4 Is Now Available
    The Wine team released today fifth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.4 has many small changes including 50 bugfixes. This stable release contains bugfixes, new cards were added to GPU description table, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.