Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Slack

New in Slackware

Filed under
Slack
  • KDE 5_15.11 for Slackware-current – visual improvements

    In one of my previous articles, where I wrote about the upcoming Slackware Live edition, I added some premature screenshots of the Plasma 5 packages I am announcing today. Just when I was preparing for upload, Pat released his big November 14th batch of updates to Slackware-current (including new kernel, compilers and X.Org), dubbing it “almost a beta”. That delayed the release process for my November Plasma 5 packages because I needed to check the impact of these updates to my already compiled packages.

  • Last week’s security updates

A Real Honest-to-Goodness Live Slackware Coming Soon

Filed under
Slack

There is Porteus and SLAX, but no real Slackware live. Perhaps that's about to change. Should Linux users live in fear of viruses and malware as Windows users do? Mel Khanlichi answered today. SteamOS was found to be lagging behind Windows performance for gaming and Josh Fruhlinger found 10 odds places for Linux. All this and more in today's Linux news.

Read more

Slackel Linux: Not Your Father's Slackware

Filed under
Reviews
Slack

You might think of the Slackel distro as a better Slackware derivative. Slackware dates back to 1992. By comparison, well-known and well-used distros such as Ubuntu, Fedora and Linux Mint were introduced in the mid-2000s. So Slackware is among the oldest actively maintained Linux distros. Despite its longevity, it has not joined more modern Linux offspring in terms of user friendliness.

Read more

Unofficial Linux Kernel 4.2.2 Now Available for Slackware 12.0 and Its Derivatives

Filed under
Linux
Slack

Arne Exton, the developer of numerous Linux kernel-based and Android-x86 distributions, was happy to inform Softpedia about the release of a custom kernel for the Slackware 12.0 operating system and its derivatives.

Read more

Slackware Packages

Filed under
Slack

Wifislax 4.11.1 Linux Distro Arrives with Linux Kernel 4.1.3 LTS, Xfce 4.12.3

Filed under
Slack

The developers of the popular Wifislax Linux distribution based on the well-known Slackware operating system and built around the KDE and Xfce desktop environments announced the release of Wifislax 4.11.1.

Read more

Vector Light Linux 7.1 Is Based on Slackware and IceWM

Filed under
Slack

Vector Light Linux, a distribution based on Slackware that uses the IceWM window manager by default, has been released and is now available for download.

Read more

Slackware-Based VectorLinux 7.1 Officially Released with the Latest Xfce Desktop

Filed under
Slack

The VectorLinux developers were euphoric to announce today, June 27, the immediate availability for download of the final release of the VectorLinux 7.1 operating system derived from Slackware.

Read more

ConnochaetOS Makes Slackware Truly Free and a Bit Easier

Filed under
OS
Slack

Of course, Linux is open source. Most people mistakenly equate open source with "free," as in pay nothing. Experienced Linux users know, however, that the open source concept separates the price of the software from the cost of obtaining enterprise-level modifications and support.

Read more

ConnochaetOS 14.1 is released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Slack

I'm happy to announce the release of ConnochaetOS 14.1. The installation ISO image comes with
Kernel GNU Linux Libre 3.10.77
IceWM 1.3.7
Iceweasel 31.6.0esr libre
Compared with RC2 Icecat was replaced by Iceweasel libre because Iceweasel needs lesser resources.
ConnochaetOS is a fully free/libre GNU/Linux distro for x86 computers with limited resources, based on Slackware and Salix OS. "Fully free" means, that ConnochaetOS does only contain free software and no proprietary, non-free software, blobs or firmware. Non-free parts of the upstream distros were removed and - where possible - replaced by free counterparts. ConnochaetOS retains full backwards compatibility with Slackware and Salix OS.
You can download the ConnochaetOS 14.1 ISO image from Sourceforge

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Released

The FreeBSD-based operating system TrueOS that's formerly known as PC-BSD has put out their last stable update of 2017. TrueOS 17.12 is now available as the latest six-month stable update for this desktop-focused FreeBSD distribution that also offers a server flavor. TrueOS continues using OpenRC as its init system and this cycle they have continued improving their Qt5-based Lumina desktop environment, the Bhyve hypervisor is now supported in the TrueOS server install, improved removable device support, and more. Read more

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more