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Slack

Slackel 7.3 Mate beta1

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Slack

Slackel 7.3 Mate beta1 has been released. Slackel is based on Slackware and Salix.

Includes the Linux kernel 5.4.50, Mate-1.22.1 and latest updates from Slackware's 'Current' tree.
Added support to do a real installation to an external usb stick or usb ssd or usb hard disk.

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[Slackware] Preparing to move to elogind

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Slack

Slackware community is very active nowadays, and that's for a reason. They are waiting for the big update coming to Slackware, which is the new Plasma 5 and XFCE. It has been requested for so long after -current start moving, but Pat hasn't made the change until 2020 when big basic components such as Qt5 went in and many followed up.

There were some distractions along the way, such as PAM taking some time to test (it was initially planned for a day or two in testing/), but at the end it was a smooth migration. I barely notice any changes since all the changes happening under the hood and it works well both in my MATE and Cinnamon project (basically for Cinnamon since i already have PAM installed, but not as part of the core packages. It just sit there as a requirement for Cinnamon-screensaver).

For next Plasma 5 and XFCE, there are some another changes needed for it to go smoothly and that's UPower and elogind. Slackware 14.2 up to -current is still using the old UPower which is already deprecated for some time, but since it's related to many other libraries/applications, Pat kept them until it's time to move on with the rest of the projects and i believe it's time. Newer UPower is needed by Plasma 5, XFCE, mate-power-manager 1.24 (it's still at 1.22 for now due to this constraints) and better battery support in Cinnamon.

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Plasma5 for Slackware: KDE 5_20.05. Also, new Ardour 6.0

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KDE
Slack

A new batch of Plasma5 packages for Slackware-current is available now. The KDE-5_20.05 release is also the last monthly update you’ll see from me for a while in my ‘ktown‘ repository. I expect Pat to add Plasma5 to Slackware-current, but I am done waiting and have an urgent need to dedicate my spare time to other matters. With PAM finally added to the core distro, there should no longer be a showstopper for getting rid of KDE4 and replacing it with Plasma5.

And remember, these packages will not work on Slackware 14.2. Along with adding the May batch for -current, I have removed the old (KDE 5_17.11) Plasma5 packages that were still in my ‘ktown’ repository for Slackware 14.2. They have been un-maintained for two and a half years, who knows what security issues they cause. If you really want or need Plasma5, migrate to Slackware-current please.

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Slackware Gets Cinnamon 4.6 Early Preview and Slackware-Based Plamo 7.2 Released in Japan

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Slack
  • Cinnamon 4.6 Early Preview

    Few days ago i saw that Cinnamon 4.6.0 has been released on GitHub and as usual, developers will still release a couple more releases before they mark it stable, but i have made some changes to the SlackBuild scripts and push it to master branch for those who are eager to try the new Cinnamon 4.6.x series.

    I believe this version will be used in the next Linux Mint 20 which will be released in June, but i want Slackware-Current users to try this version first Smile

  • Plamo 7.2 リリース

    従来同様、4.7Gのサイズに収まるようにDVD用は2枚組みです。他に USB メモリからインストールする用に DVD 2 枚分をまとめてひとつにした USB 用イメージがあります(_usb.iso)。

Distros: Debian, SUSE and Slackware

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GNU
Linux
Slack
  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in April 2020

    This month I accepted 384 packages and rejected 47. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 457.

  • Use Speedtest CLI to test your Internet Speed on Debian 10

    In order to fix problems with slow connections that lead to poor Internet access, we first want to check the Internet speed on our system. E.g. when you have switched to a new internet connection and want to make sure that you are getting what the provider offers, it is useful to check the internet speed. In this article, we will use a Linux command-line tool called speedtest-cli. It is written in Python and uses the website speedtest.net to check bandwidth by uploading and downloading data to and from your system.

  • Community Account Migration

    The authentication system behind the following services are expect to changed this month. Here is a list of services the might be affected. An email about this topic was sent out on the openSUSE Project Mailing List. More information about this topic will be updated on the Account Migration Wiki page.

    [...]

    The services using the Community Accounts will migrate step-by-step. This means that for some days you need to use the old and new credentials until the services are migrated.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/19

    During this week, we managed to set a new record: the most broken Tumbleweed snapshot handed over to openQA. W whopping 9 tests out of > 220 passed, everything else failed. What a luck we have openQA, right? Nothing of that was mirrored out and sent out to users. Fur the curious ones: the issue came from an incomplete rebuild after the switch to Ruby 2.7. Still, we managed to release 6 snapshots during this week (0429, 0501, 0502, 0503, 0504 and 0506)

  • Old box, dumb code, few thousand connections, no big deal

    I wrote up a load testing tool, too. It will create any number of worker threads, each of which opens a TCP connection back to the server. Each one of those will fire a request down the pipe, wait for the response, sleep a configurable period, and then go again.

    Let's say I stand up the server and a loadgen instance on the same machine. In this case it's my nine-year-old workstation box running Slackware64. I tell the load generator to hit the server (on localhost), run 2000 workers, and wait 200 milliseconds between queries.

Chrome/Chromium 83 Beta and Chromium 81 for Slackware 14.2

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Slack
Web
Gaming
  • Chrome 83 Beta: Cross-site Scripting Protection, Improved Form Controls, and Safe Cross-origin Resource Sharing

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Learn more about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 83 is beta as of April 16, 2020.

  • Chrome 83 Beta Rolls Out With Better Form Controls, Barcode Detection API

    Following the release of Chrome 81 earlier this month, Chrome 83 is now in beta with Google having skipped Chrome 82 due to delays / internal issues.

    Chrome 83 Beta is out today with trusted types for DOM manipulation, improved form controls that provide much nicer looking HTML input form controls by default, new origin trials, a barcode detection API is introduced as part of their shape detection API, various WebRTC improvements, and other changes.

  • Chromium 81 – and the new build process for Slackware 14.2

    Google released version 81 of their Chromium browser sources last week, after spending a lot of effort to bring security patches to the 80.x releases in the weeks before. As said before, Google is going to skip the 82 release entirely because of the staffing challenges resulting from the Corina crisis, and will jump straight to release 83 somewhere mid-May.
    I uploaded packages for chromium 81.0.4044.92 a few days ago – but those were only for Slackware-current.

    I found it impossible to compile the latest Chromium 81 code on Slackware 14.2 and I had been trying for days. Yesterday I finally succeeded after more than a week of trying since the sources were released. I can not sit behind my computer for long, but that was not too much of a setback in this particular case. I kept running into new compiler or linker errors, then I would think of a fix, set the box to compile again and had to wait for hours to see the result… and lie down in the meantime. For an entire week, I met failure upon failure.

New ISOs for Slackware Live (liveslak 1.3.5)

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Slack

I have uploaded a set of fresh Slackware Live Edition ISO images. They are based on the liveslak scripts version 1.3.5. The ISOs are variants of Slackware-current “Tue Feb 18 05:20:50 UTC 2020” with the 5.4.20 kernel but without PAM.
The PLASMA5 variant is my february release of ‘ktown‘ aka KDE-5_20.02 .

Download these ISO files preferably via rsync://slackware.nl/mirrors/slackware-live/ (or its mirror rsync://slackware.uk/people/alien-slacklive/ but allow that 24 to sync up) because that allows easy resume if you cannot download the file in one go.

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Slackware Going for PAM

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Slack
  • Slackware Going for PAM

    It has been requested by many people in the past, many debates have been sprung due to this discussions, and finally in 2020 Patrick is taking PAM in -current (still in /testing for now, but hopefully will be merged in the main tree in the next few days or hours). It's a long journey to get PAM gets included and some people have been working on this as a side project, namely Vincent Batts, Robby Workman, and Ivandi. Their work is finally paid off and next Slackware release will have PAM support out-of-the-box, so people in the corporate can start working on AD (Active Directory) on top of Slackware.

  • PAM landed in Slackware today, also new Plasma5 packages available

    What does that mean? Not much actually. Your Slackware will keep functioning as before. The new functionality offered by the Pluggable Authentication Modules is not directly visible.

    [...]

    Download the KDE-5_20.02 from the usual location at https://slackware.nl/alien-kde/current/ or one of its mirrors like http://slackware.uk/people/alien-kde/current/ .
    Check out the README file in the root of the repository for detailed installation or upgrade instructions.

    Development of Plasma5 is tracked in git: https://git.slackware.nl/ktown/ .

    A new Plasma5 Live ISO is going to be available soon at https://slackware.nl/slackware-live/latest/ (rsync://slackware.nl/mirrors/slackware-live/latest/) with user/pass being “live/live” as always. I am still working on an improved ‘setup2hd‘ and depending on the amount of work (and setbacks) I may decide to leave the ‘old’ setup2hd script in the ISO for now.

New ISOs for Slackware Live (liveslak-1.3.4)

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Slack

I have uploaded a set of fresh Slackware Live Edition ISO images. They are based on the liveslak scripts version 1.3.4.

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New Packages in Slackware

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Slack
  • LibreOffice updates for Slackware 14.2 and -current

    This month, I am building different versions for LibreOffice, for our stable Slackware 14.2 and for the -current testing ground. During my holiday, new versions became available and last week I built packages from those sources.

    The 6.2.6 release which was announced by the Document Foundation two weeks ago brings some security fixes to the 6.2 series. Therefore it was important to get rid of the old 6.2.5 packages. I built 6.2.6 for Slackware 14.2 and those packages have been available for download now since early last week. Go get them!

  • VLC 3.0.8 packages

    The Release Notes state that this releases provides fixes for several security issues among wich 11 which are CVE-worthy. Meaning that it’s prudent to upgrade your VLC to 3.0.8 soonest.

    I have the new packages available (for Slackware 14.2 and -current) in my repository since a couple of days. I used the opportunity to update the following internal libraries as well: bluray, dav1d, ebml, and matroska.

    You will also probably note that there is no “npapi-vlc” package. I decided to retire this VLC based NPAPI webbrowser plugin from my repository. Modern browsers are all moving away from NPAPI plugin support, and relying on HTML5 instead. Chrome/Chromium always only supported PPAPI based plugins anyway.

  • Chromium package updates

    There was a new Chromium source release last week, but there were other software releases that had priority to get packages out the door. Therefore I could only chromium packages this weekend.
    Chromium 76.0.3809.132 fixes 3 security holes. Note that the version before that (76.0.3809.100) also fixed 4 critical holes but I never packaged that as I went on holiday. So, upgrading now would be a good idea.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Open Usage Commons

  • Introducing the Open Usage Commons

    Open source maintainers don’t often spend time thinking about their project’s trademarks, and with good reason: between code contribution, documentation, crafting the technical direction, and creating a healthy contributor community, there’s plenty to do without spending time considering how your project’s name or logo will be used. But trademarks – whether a name, logo, or badge – are an extension of a project’s decision to be open source. Just as your project’s open source license demonstrates that your codebase is for free and fair use, an open source project trademark policy in keeping with the Open Source Definition gives everyone – upstream contributors and downstream consumers – comfort that they are using your project’s marks in a fair and accurate way.

  • Open Usage Commons Is Google-Backed Organization For Helping With Open-Source Project Trademarks

    Open Usage Commons is a new organization announced today that is backed by Google for helping open-source projects in managing their trademarks. Open Usage Commons was started by Google in conjunction with academia, independent contributors, and others for helping to assert and manage project identities through trademark management and conformance testing.

  • The "Open Usage Commons" launches

    Google has announced the creation of the Open Usage Commons, which is intended to help open-source projects manage their trademarks.

  • Announcing a new kind of open source organization

    Google has deep roots in open source. We're proud of our 20 years of contributions and community collaboration. The scale and tenure of Google’s open source participation has taught us what works well, what doesn’t, and where the corner cases are that challenge projects.

Android Leftovers

GNOME, Linux, Qt and Git Programming

  • Philip Withnall: URI parsing and building in GLib

    Marc-André Lureau has landed GUri support in GLib, and it’ll be available in GLib 2.65.1 (due out in the next few days). GUri is a new API for parsing and building URIs, roughly equivalent to SoupURI already provided by libsoup — but since URIs are so pervasive, and used even if you’re not actually doing HTTP conversations, it makes sense to have a structured representation for them in GLib.

  • Sandboxing in Linux with zero lines of code

    Modern Linux operating systems provide many tools to run code more securely. There are namespaces (the basic building blocks for containers), Linux Security Modules, Integrity Measurement Architecture etc. In this post we will review Linux seccomp and learn how to sandbox any (even a proprietary) application without writing a single line of code.

  • Mario Sanchez Prada: ​Chromium now migrated to the new C++ Mojo types

    At the end of the last year I wrote a long blog post summarizing the main work I was involved with as part of Igalia’s Chromium team. In it I mentioned that a big chunk of my time was spent working on the migration to the new C++ Mojo types across the entire codebase of Chromium, in the context of the Onion Soup 2.0 project. For those of you who don’t know what Mojo is about, there is extensive information about it in Chromium’s documentation, but for the sake of this post, let’s simplify things and say that Mojo is a modern replacement to Chromium’s legacy IPC APIs which enables a better, simpler and more direct way of communication among all of Chromium’s different processes.

  • 6 best practices for teams using Git

    Everyone should follow standard conventions for branch naming, tagging, and coding. Every organization has standards or best practices, and many recommendations are freely available on the internet. What's important is to pick a suitable convention early on and follow it as a team. Also, different team members will have different levels of expertise with Git. You should create and maintain a basic set of instructions for performing common Git operations that follow the project's conventions.

  • Qt for MCUs 1.3 released

    Qt for MCUs 1.3 is now available in the Qt installer. Download it to get the latest improvements and create stunning GUIs with the newly available timeline animation system. Since the initial release of Qt for MCUs 1.0 back in December last year, we've been hard at work to bring new features to MCUs with the 1.1 and 1.2 releases. Efforts haven't slowed down and it's already time to bring you another batch of improvements. Besides the new features, One of the goals has been to make Qt Quick Ultralite a true subset of Qt Quick and align their QML APIs to ensure both code and skills can be reused from traditional Qt platforms to microcontrollers. With Qt for MCUs 1.3, QML code written for Qt Quick Ultralite is now source-compatible with Qt 5.15 LTS.