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Slack

LibreOffice 6.4.5 finally for Slackware 14.2

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LibO
Slack

The Document Foundation recently released version 7.0.0 of their Libre Office suite of applications. The packages for Slackware-current can be found in my repository. But the situation for Slackware 14.2 used to be different – I got stuck after LibreOffice 6.2 because the newer source releases (6.3 and onwards) require versions of system software that our stable Slackware 14.2 platform does not offer.

From time to time during the last year, when there was time and the build box was not compiling packages, I messed around with the libreoffice.SlackBuild script in futile attempts to compile recent versions of LibreOffice on Slackware 14.2. I failed all the time.
Until last week. After I had uploaded the new KDE Plasma5 packages to ‘ktown‘, I had an epiphany and decided to use a new approach. What I did was: question all the historic stuff in the SlackBuild script that got added whenever I needed to work around compilation failures; and accept that the compilation needs newer versions of software than Slackware 14.2 offers. The first statement meant that I disabled patches and variable declarations that messed with compiler and linker; and for the second statement I stuck to a single guideline: the end product, if I were able to compile a package successfully, has to run out of the box on Slackware 14.2 without the need to update any of the core Slackware packages.

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Porteus 5.0-rc2 Released: Slackware-Based Fast And Portable Linux Distro

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Linux
Slack

More than a year later, the Dev team of Porteus Linux has finally announced the second release candidate (RC-2) for its upcoming version 5.0. This means you can now try the new testing version Porteus 5.0-rc2.

For those who don’t know, Porteus is based on one of the oldest Linux distros, Slackware. It was also formerly known as Slax remix when it started as a community remix of Slax OS.

Porteus aims to provide a portable, fast, and light operating system that you can boot directly in less than 15 seconds (in the case of LXDE desktop) from CD, USB flash drive, hard drive, or other bootable storage media.

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KDE Plasma 5 August 2020 release for Slackware

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KDE
Slack

New Plasma5 packages for Slackware-current are ready for download & installation. I skipped July (holiday season) and so here is KDE-5_20.08 aka my August 2020 release. Be sure to read the upgrade instructions very carefully to prevent breakage, because starting with my June batch the goal is to remove Slackware’s ConsoleKit2 and replace it with elogind!.

It would not harm if you (re-)read my previous blog article about Plasma5, “Replacing ConsoleKit2 with elogind – first steps“. It has a lot more detail about the reasons for this move as well as guidance on using the Wayland Window Manager (as a test) instead of regular X.Org. Note that Wayland sessions still need a lot of maturing and X.Org will remain Slackware’s default choice.

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Slackel 7.3 Mate beta1

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Slack

Slackel 7.3 Mate beta1 has been released. Slackel is based on Slackware and Salix.

Includes the Linux kernel 5.4.50, Mate-1.22.1 and latest updates from Slackware's 'Current' tree.
Added support to do a real installation to an external usb stick or usb ssd or usb hard disk.

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[Slackware] Preparing to move to elogind

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Slack

Slackware community is very active nowadays, and that's for a reason. They are waiting for the big update coming to Slackware, which is the new Plasma 5 and XFCE. It has been requested for so long after -current start moving, but Pat hasn't made the change until 2020 when big basic components such as Qt5 went in and many followed up.

There were some distractions along the way, such as PAM taking some time to test (it was initially planned for a day or two in testing/), but at the end it was a smooth migration. I barely notice any changes since all the changes happening under the hood and it works well both in my MATE and Cinnamon project (basically for Cinnamon since i already have PAM installed, but not as part of the core packages. It just sit there as a requirement for Cinnamon-screensaver).

For next Plasma 5 and XFCE, there are some another changes needed for it to go smoothly and that's UPower and elogind. Slackware 14.2 up to -current is still using the old UPower which is already deprecated for some time, but since it's related to many other libraries/applications, Pat kept them until it's time to move on with the rest of the projects and i believe it's time. Newer UPower is needed by Plasma 5, XFCE, mate-power-manager 1.24 (it's still at 1.22 for now due to this constraints) and better battery support in Cinnamon.

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Plasma5 for Slackware: KDE 5_20.05. Also, new Ardour 6.0

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KDE
Slack

A new batch of Plasma5 packages for Slackware-current is available now. The KDE-5_20.05 release is also the last monthly update you’ll see from me for a while in my ‘ktown‘ repository. I expect Pat to add Plasma5 to Slackware-current, but I am done waiting and have an urgent need to dedicate my spare time to other matters. With PAM finally added to the core distro, there should no longer be a showstopper for getting rid of KDE4 and replacing it with Plasma5.

And remember, these packages will not work on Slackware 14.2. Along with adding the May batch for -current, I have removed the old (KDE 5_17.11) Plasma5 packages that were still in my ‘ktown’ repository for Slackware 14.2. They have been un-maintained for two and a half years, who knows what security issues they cause. If you really want or need Plasma5, migrate to Slackware-current please.

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Slackware Gets Cinnamon 4.6 Early Preview and Slackware-Based Plamo 7.2 Released in Japan

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Slack
  • Cinnamon 4.6 Early Preview

    Few days ago i saw that Cinnamon 4.6.0 has been released on GitHub and as usual, developers will still release a couple more releases before they mark it stable, but i have made some changes to the SlackBuild scripts and push it to master branch for those who are eager to try the new Cinnamon 4.6.x series.

    I believe this version will be used in the next Linux Mint 20 which will be released in June, but i want Slackware-Current users to try this version first Smile

  • Plamo 7.2 リリース

    従来同様、4.7Gのサイズに収まるようにDVD用は2枚組みです。他に USB メモリからインストールする用に DVD 2 枚分をまとめてひとつにした USB 用イメージがあります(_usb.iso)。

Distros: Debian, SUSE and Slackware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Slack
  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in April 2020

    This month I accepted 384 packages and rejected 47. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 457.

  • Use Speedtest CLI to test your Internet Speed on Debian 10

    In order to fix problems with slow connections that lead to poor Internet access, we first want to check the Internet speed on our system. E.g. when you have switched to a new internet connection and want to make sure that you are getting what the provider offers, it is useful to check the internet speed. In this article, we will use a Linux command-line tool called speedtest-cli. It is written in Python and uses the website speedtest.net to check bandwidth by uploading and downloading data to and from your system.

  • Community Account Migration

    The authentication system behind the following services are expect to changed this month. Here is a list of services the might be affected. An email about this topic was sent out on the openSUSE Project Mailing List. More information about this topic will be updated on the Account Migration Wiki page.

    [...]

    The services using the Community Accounts will migrate step-by-step. This means that for some days you need to use the old and new credentials until the services are migrated.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/19

    During this week, we managed to set a new record: the most broken Tumbleweed snapshot handed over to openQA. W whopping 9 tests out of > 220 passed, everything else failed. What a luck we have openQA, right? Nothing of that was mirrored out and sent out to users. Fur the curious ones: the issue came from an incomplete rebuild after the switch to Ruby 2.7. Still, we managed to release 6 snapshots during this week (0429, 0501, 0502, 0503, 0504 and 0506)

  • Old box, dumb code, few thousand connections, no big deal

    I wrote up a load testing tool, too. It will create any number of worker threads, each of which opens a TCP connection back to the server. Each one of those will fire a request down the pipe, wait for the response, sleep a configurable period, and then go again.

    Let's say I stand up the server and a loadgen instance on the same machine. In this case it's my nine-year-old workstation box running Slackware64. I tell the load generator to hit the server (on localhost), run 2000 workers, and wait 200 milliseconds between queries.

Chrome/Chromium 83 Beta and Chromium 81 for Slackware 14.2

Filed under
Slack
Web
Gaming
  • Chrome 83 Beta: Cross-site Scripting Protection, Improved Form Controls, and Safe Cross-origin Resource Sharing

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Learn more about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 83 is beta as of April 16, 2020.

  • Chrome 83 Beta Rolls Out With Better Form Controls, Barcode Detection API

    Following the release of Chrome 81 earlier this month, Chrome 83 is now in beta with Google having skipped Chrome 82 due to delays / internal issues.

    Chrome 83 Beta is out today with trusted types for DOM manipulation, improved form controls that provide much nicer looking HTML input form controls by default, new origin trials, a barcode detection API is introduced as part of their shape detection API, various WebRTC improvements, and other changes.

  • Chromium 81 – and the new build process for Slackware 14.2

    Google released version 81 of their Chromium browser sources last week, after spending a lot of effort to bring security patches to the 80.x releases in the weeks before. As said before, Google is going to skip the 82 release entirely because of the staffing challenges resulting from the Corina crisis, and will jump straight to release 83 somewhere mid-May.
    I uploaded packages for chromium 81.0.4044.92 a few days ago – but those were only for Slackware-current.

    I found it impossible to compile the latest Chromium 81 code on Slackware 14.2 and I had been trying for days. Yesterday I finally succeeded after more than a week of trying since the sources were released. I can not sit behind my computer for long, but that was not too much of a setback in this particular case. I kept running into new compiler or linker errors, then I would think of a fix, set the box to compile again and had to wait for hours to see the result… and lie down in the meantime. For an entire week, I met failure upon failure.

New ISOs for Slackware Live (liveslak 1.3.5)

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Slack

I have uploaded a set of fresh Slackware Live Edition ISO images. They are based on the liveslak scripts version 1.3.5. The ISOs are variants of Slackware-current “Tue Feb 18 05:20:50 UTC 2020” with the 5.4.20 kernel but without PAM.
The PLASMA5 variant is my february release of ‘ktown‘ aka KDE-5_20.02 .

Download these ISO files preferably via rsync://slackware.nl/mirrors/slackware-live/ (or its mirror rsync://slackware.uk/people/alien-slacklive/ but allow that 24 to sync up) because that allows easy resume if you cannot download the file in one go.

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Security Leftovers

today's howtos

Python Programming

  • Teaching Comparing Strings in Python the Hard Way

    Some long-time subscribers may remember that I am teaching math to 10-18 year old students. The COVID-19 situation nearly made me quit and look for an alternative to earn my rent, but my love for the kids and teaching them was stronger. After a few months of shortage, we found ways to responsibly resume the meetings, either online or with safety measures. When schools were closed, some parents wondered what they could do to drag their offsprings away from computers; playing computer games seemed to be the new all-time favorite hobby. Of course, resistance was expected. Why not turn this interest into something useful? I didn’t expect that kids as young as eight are interested to learn how to create games. But why not? I learned from electronic magazines and books how computers, MS BASIC, and Z80 assembly worked when I was ten, and I am sure I would have been interested with eight, if my classmate had broken his leg two years earlier… But that’s not the story I want to tell.

  • This Python script mimics Babbage's Difference Engine

    After some contemplation, Charles Babbage's ghost replied, "This is all well and good, but here you only take the number of rows and give the number of marbles. With my table, I can also tell you how large a pyramid you might construct given a certain number of marbles; simply look it up in the table." Python had to agree that this was indeed the case, yet it knew that surely this must be solvable as well. With little delay, Python came back with another short script. The solution involves thinking through the math in reverse.

  • Setup and debug a Django app in PyCharm Community Edition

    Did you know that the freely available PyCharm community edition is perfectly suited for developing and debugging Django web applications? The goal of the article is to help you setup a new Django application framework in the PyCharm community edition, to the point that you can run and debug the Django application in PyCharm. We’ll also setup a virtual environment for the PyCharm project and install Django inside this virtual environment. [...] PyCharm comes in two editions: the professional edition and the community edition. The professional edition needs to be bought. In contrast, JetBrains makes the community edition free and open source. With other words, you can download the community edition for free and get started with it right away. When inspecting the differences between the PyCharm editions, you’ll notice that the PyCharm professional edition features all sort of Django specific support as you can read here. From this information you might think that you absolutely need to purchase the PyCharm professional edition, when programming and debugging Django applications. This is incorrect. You can definitely program and debug your Django application with the free PyCharm community edition. In this article, I’ll explain step-by-step how you can setup and debug a Django application in the free PyCharm community edition.

  • Using Google Login With Flask

    In this course, you’ll work through the creation of a Flask web application. Your application will allow a user to log in using their Google identity instead of creating a new account. There are tons of benefits with this method of user management. It’s going to be safer and simpler than managing the traditional username and password combinations.

  • Python Morsels: Writing a for loop

    You can use a for loop to loop over any iterable (iter-able). Anything you're able to iterate over can be looped over with a for loop.

  • Design of the Versioned HDF5 Library

    In a previous post, we introduced the Versioned HDF5 library and described some of its features. In this post, we'll go into detail on how the underlying design of the library works on a technical level. Versioned HDF5 is a library that wraps h5py and offers a versioned abstraction for HDF5 groups and datasets. Versioned HDF5 works fundamentally as a copy-on-write system. The basic idea of copy-on-write is that all data is effectively immutable in the backend. Whenever a high-level representation of data is modified, it is copied to a new location in the backend, leaving the original version intact. Any references to the original will continue to point to it.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #440 (Sept. 29, 2020)
  • Why use Python Programming for building a Healthcare Application

    Python is one of the best programming languages used across a plethora of industries. The healthcare sector is a significant benefactor of the language. With Python programming in healthcare, institutions and clinicians can deliver better patient outcomes through dynamic and scalable applications. Today, healthcare is generating tons of data from patients and facilities. By making the best use of this data, doctors can predict better treatment methods and improve the overall healthcare delivery system.

  • The Python return Statement: Usage and Best Practices

    The Python return statement is a key component of functions and methods. You can use the return statement to make your functions send Python objects back to the caller code. These objects are known as the function’s return value. You can use them to perform further computation in your programs. [...] Most programming languages allow you to assign a name to a code block that performs a concrete computation. These named code blocks can be reused quickly because you can use their name to call them from different places in your code. Programmers call these named code blocks subroutines, routines, procedures, or functions depending on the language they use. In some languages, there’s a clear difference between a routine or procedure and a function. Sometimes that difference is so strong that you need to use a specific keyword to define a procedure or subroutine and another keyword to define a function. For example the Visual Basic programming language uses Sub and Function to differentiate between the two.

  • Test and Code: 132: mocking in Python - Anna-Lena Popkes

    Using mock objects during testing in Python. Anna-Lena joins the podcast to teach us about mocks and using unittest.mock objects during testing.

  • Resources: Python for Kids

    Friend of Mu, Kevin Thomas has been hard at work creating free-to-use resources for kids (and older kids) who want to learn Python, with the BBC micro:bit and Mu. [...] Meanwhile, in our secret fortress of solitude, the Mu “minions” (Munions..?) have been hard at work on some fantastic updates which we hope to reveal very soon.

  • wxPython by Example – Drag-and-Drop an Image (Video)

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to drag an image into your #wxPython application and display it to your user.

  • Solving Python Package Creation For End User Applications With PyOxidizer - Episode 282

    Python is a powerful and expressive programming language with a vast ecosystem of incredible applications. Unfortunately, it has always been challenging to share those applications with non-technical end users. Gregory Szorc set out to solve the problem of how to put your code on someone else's computer and have it run without having to rely on extra systems such as virtualenvs or Docker. In this episode he shares his work on PyOxidizer and how it allows you to build a self-contained Python runtime along with statically linked dependencies and the software that you want to run. He also digs into some of the edge cases in the Python language and its ecosystem that make this a challenging problem to solve, and some of the lessons that he has learned in the process. PyOxidizer is an exciting step forward in the evolution of packaging and distribution for the Python language and community.

  • Sumana Harihareswara is an open-source software fairy... and other things I learned recording her DevJourney
  • All You Need To Know For Selenium Testing On The Cloud

    Building large-scale web applications take a monumental effort. Testing the quality of these applications requires a whole other level of dedication. From a developer’s vantage point, the focus is on improving the feature set, speeding up the overall performance, and building a scalable product. As far as QA is concerned, a lot of focus is on usability testing and compatibility testing while testing a website or web application. If you are building a consumer-facing website or web application, your product is likely to be accessed by users from across the globe. Your product must be tested on various combinations of web browsers, devices, and platforms (operating systems) to ensure top-notch performance. Hence, browser compatibility testing becomes even more critical. No one wants to lose potential customers because of unpleasant user experience on select few browsers, devices, or platforms.

  • Montreal Python User Group: Montréal-Python 80 – Pedal Kayak

    Greetings Python community, October is fast approaching with vibrant fall colour and our favourite apples. This is the occasion to set the table for our 80th event – Pedal Kayak – which will take place this coming October 26.

  • Simple FPS fingerprint similarity search: variations on a theme

    It's easy to write a fingerprint search tool. Peter Willett tells a story about how very soon after he, Winterman, and Bawden published Implementation of nearest-neighbor searching in an online chemical structure search system (1986) (which described their nearest-neighbor similarity search implementation and observed that Tanimoto similarity gave more satisfactory results than cosine similarity), he heard from a company which wrote their own implementation, on a Friday afternoon, and found it to be very useful. Now, my memory of his story may be missing in the details, but the key point is that it's always been easy to write a fingerprint similarity search tool. So, let's do it! I'll call my program ssimsearch because it's going to be a simplified version of chemfp's simsearch command-line tool. In fact, I'll hard-code just about everything, with only the bare minimum of checking.

Android Leftovers