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NetBSD 9.0 available!

Filed under
BSD

Sixth months after the start of the release engineering process, NetBSD 9.0 is now available.

Since the start of the release process a lot of improvements went into the branch - over 700 pullups were processed!

This includes usbnet (a common framework for usb ethernet drivers), aarch64 stability enhancements and lots of new hardware support, installer/sysinst fixes and changes to the NVMM (hardware virtualization) interface.

We hope this will lead to the best NetBSD release ever (only to be topped by NetBSD 10 - hopefully later this year).

Read more

Also: NetBSD 9.0 Debuts As The "Best NetBSD Release Ever"

OpenSSH 8.2 was released on 2020-02-14.

Filed under
Security
BSD

It is now possible[1] to perform chosen-prefix attacks against the SHA-1 hash algorithm for less than USD$50K. For this reason, we will be disabling the "ssh-rsa" public key signature algorithm that depends on SHA-1 by default in a near-future release.

This algorithm is unfortunately still used widely despite the existence of better alternatives, being the only remaining public key signature algorithm specified by the original SSH RFCs.

Read more

Also: DragonFlyBSD Improves Its TMPFS Implementation For Better Throughput Performance

Audiocasts/Shows: Command Line Heroes, BSD Now and Linux Headlines

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Command Line Heroes season 4 episode 2: Mainframes

    The story of a small team of rebel employees at General Electric who built a mainframe that pushed computing from a niche market to the mainstream.

  • Kubernetes on bhyve | BSD Now 337

    Happinesses and stresses of full-time FOSS work, building a FreeBSD fileserver, Kubernetes on FreeBSD bhyve, NetBSD 9 RC1 available, OPNSense 20.1 is here, HardenedBSD’s idealistic future, and more.

  • 2020-02-13 | Linux Headlines

    IBM brings Kubernetes to the mainframe, PeerTube 2.1 is packed with polish, lazy image loading is slowly coming to Firefox, and find out which podcast was awarded Podcast of the Year.

Second (final) release candidate for NetBSD 9.0 available!

Filed under
BSD

Sixth months after the start of the release engineering process for 9.0, the second (and most likely final) release candidate is now available.

Shortly after the first release candidate had been published and feedback came it, it became clear that this was not going to be the final state of 9.0. In the end a lot of fixes were done, but we used the opportunity to also incorporate more hardware support (Pinebook Pro) and update a few components (dhcpcd, openssl).

We will be very restrictive with further changes and expect a quick and smooth release from this point on. Tentative release date is February 14, 2020.

Since the start of the release process a lot of improvements went into the branch - nearly 700 pullups were processed!

This includes usbnet (a common framework for usb ethernet drivers), aarch64 stability enhancements and lots of new hardware support, installer/sysinst fixes and changes to the NVMM (hardware virtualization) interface.

We hope this will lead to the best NetBSD release ever (only to be topped by NetBSD 10 - hopefully later this year).

Read more

Also: NetBSD 9.0 Coming Soon With 64-bit ARM, Updated ZFS, Hardware-Accelerated Virtualization

GhostBSD 20 - When there's something wrong with your Tux

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

In the Linux world, Arch is the great noob equalizer. But there's an ever more frightening beast in the forest. It's BSD, and even invoking its name can send the lesser man into despair. The simple truth of the matter is, throughout the nerdy circles of the world, BSD holds a respectable place as a stable, reliable workhorse. But it's never distinguished itself as a viable desktop alternative.

Over the years, I've dabbled in BSD quite some - you can check my UNIX reviews to figure out what gives. Sometimes, there would be this or that BSD flavor that surprised with its simplicity, but things would usually unravel at some point, whether it's hardware compatibility, disk-greedy partitioning, or perhaps the ease of everyday use. Then, recently, I came across GhostBSD, and it looks pretty and inviting. So let's see what gives.

Read more

BSD: HardenedBSD and AsiaBSDCon

Filed under
BSD
  • HardenedBSD Tor Onion Service v3 Nodes

    I've been working today on deploying Tor Onion Service v3 nodes across our build infrastructure. I'm happy to announce that the public portion of this is now completed. Below you will find various onion service hostnames and their match to our infrastructure.

  • The MWL 2020 Asia Tour

    Why do this trip, when I loathe travel? Over the last twenty years, I’ve promised several folks that I would one day attend AsiaBSDCon. I keep my promises. I’m looking forward to being there, but not to getting there. The Bangalore trip is serendipitous. Presenting technology is how I built my career. Bangalore is a technology center and obviously a place I should present in. HasGeek asked if I would be interested, I said “if you could put an event by AsiaBSDCon,” and those folks actually went and did it. I’m simultaneously amazed and honored that they’ve gone to such trouble.

BSD: HAMMER2 and First FreeBSD Conference in Australia

Filed under
BSD
  • HAMMER2 questions

    Still, my recommendation is that for anything that fits on one drive no mirroring or RAID should be used. Make discrete backups to another drive on a regular schedule instead. RAIDs are not actually any more reliable than non-RAID on small systems in terms of machine uptime. For larger many-drive arrays HAMMER2 just isn't the right solution (not yet) and I would recommend running ZFS on FreeBSD instead. But for any single-drive solution (even a large one), HAMMER2 gives premium performance and has a number of extremely useful features built-in such as automatic de-duplication (when copying a large file or tree), and compression. I use HAMMER2 on a bunch of 4TB HDDs and SSDs myself and it works flawlessly.

  • The first FreeBSD conference in Australia

    While there are many prominant Australian FreeBSD contributers, sysadmins, and users, we’ve always had to venture overseas for conferences. We’re always told Australians are among the most ardent travellers, but I always wondered if we could do a domestic event as well.

    And on Tuesday, we did! Deb Goodkin and the FreeBSD Foundation graciously organised and chaired a dedicated FreeBSD miniconf at the long-running linux.conf.au event held each year in a different city in Australia and New Zealand.

OPNsense 20.1 “Keen Kingfisher” and OPNsense 19.7.10 Released

Filed under
OS
Security
BSD

  • OPNsense 20.1 “Keen Kingfisher” released

    For over 5 years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

    20.1, nicknamed "Keen Kingfisher", is a subtle improvement on sustainable firewall experience. This release adds VXLAN and additional loopback device support, IPsec public key authentication and elliptic curve TLS certificate creation amongst others. Third party software has been updated to their latest versions. The logging frontend was rewritten for MVC with seamless API support. On the far side the documentation increased in quality as well as quantity and now presents itself in a familiar menu layout.

    Download links, an installation guide[1] and the checksums for the images can be found below as well.

  • OPNsense 19.7.10 released

    Hey hey,

    As Thursday nears the last preparations for 20.1 are underway. As a quick
    relief here is the End-Of-Life release of the 19.7 series with a tiny number
    of updates.

    Remember that when 20.1 is available it will take up to a day before we
    release the hotfix with the major upgrade path enabled. Please be patient
    as we simply want to ensure that upgrades will not be bumpy affair.

    Here are the full patch notes:

    o firewall: fix a typo in CARP validation
    o firmware: revoke 19.1 fingerprint
    o ipsec: add configurable dpdaction (contributed by Marcel Menzel)
    o mvc: BaseListField ignoring empty selected field
    o plugins: os-haproxy 2.20[1]
    o plugins: os-mail-backup 1.1[2]
    o plugins: os-nrpe 1.0 (contributed by Michael Muenz)
    o plugins: os-theme-rebellion 1.8.3 (contributed by Team Rebellion)
    o plugins: os-vnstat 1.2[3]
    o plugins: zabbix4-proxy 1.2[4]
    o ports: ca_root_nss 3.49.1
    o ports: curl 7.68.0[5]
    o ports: urllib3 1.27.7[6]
    o ports: isc-dhcp 4.4.2[7]

    Stay safe,
    Your OPNsense team

FreeBSD Quarterly Report

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD quarterly report for the period October 2019 - December 2019

    Here is the last quarterly status report for 2019. As you might remember from last report, we changed our timeline: now we collect reports the last month of each quarter and we edit and publish the full document the next month. Thus, we cover here the period October 2019 - December 2019.

    If you thought that the FreeBSD community was less active in the Christmas' quarter you will be glad to be proven wrong: a quick glance at the summary will be sufficient to see that much work has been done in the last months.

  • FreeBSD Had A Very Busy End Of Year 2019 With Numerous Advancements

    The FreeBSD project has issued their last quarterly status update for 2019.

    During Q4-2019 were many improvements to the FreeBSD project itself and related BSD ecosystem. Some of their happenings for Q4 included:

    - Delivering the successful FreeBSD 12.1-RELEASE in early November.

    - Support for newer Intel WiFi chipsets. As part of that, WiFi now works on the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 7th Gen laptop which is the laptop FreeBSD Foundation is aiming for good BSD support.

Meet FuryBSD: A New Desktop BSD Distribution

Filed under
BSD

FuryBSD is a new BSD distribution based on FreeBSD and tweaked for desktops. Here's more information about this new project.
Read more

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10 Best Linux Terminal Emulators [2020 Edition]

Do you prefer terminal emulators over GUI? But there are times when the terminal’s decent styling seems boring. In such cases, you look for more options to customize the terminal just like we do while choosing Linux distros. If that’s the case, your wait is over as we bring the list of best terminal emulators for Linux that you can use to refresh your monotonous daily work. Along with the styling, you can also turn the single terminal into a multigrid, observing the activity of each terminal simultaneously. Read more