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BSD

Webchats (so-called 'Events'): Red Hat/IBM, FreeBSD, KubeCon, and Other LF Fluff

Filed under
Red Hat
BSD
  • Hybrid and edge strategies in an open-source world will be key focus during Red Hat Summit on Apr. 27, 28

    When IBM announced its intention to acquire Red Hat Inc. for $34 billion in 2018, it was widely viewed as a sign that the open-source train had finally arrived in the station. Less than three years later, open source has grown to encompass not only the station, but the train tracks and surrounding enterprise territory as far as the eye can see.

    In March, Red Hat released its “State of Enterprise Open Source” report, which, not surprisingly, validated the technology’s widespread enterprise influence. The report found that 90% of IT leaders were using open-source products, primarily in infrastructure modernization, networking and application development.

  • FreeBSD meetings on the Desktop

    FreeBSD on the desktop is a whole stack - X11, Qt, KDE Frameworks, KDE Plasma and KDE Gear, and Wayland, and Poppler and GTK - o my!

  • Ubuntu Blog: Canonical & Ubuntu at KubeCon Europe 2021

    It’s that time of the year again! KubeCon and CloudNativeCon Europe 2021 are just around the corner and, as always, Canonical and Ubuntu have a lot cooking in the Kubernetes oven especially for the event. This year, we’ll be showcasing solutions and best practices around Charmed Operators, as well as streamlined Kubernetes at the edge with micro clouds.

    We’ll be at KubeCon on May 4-7th, as well as hosting a co-located event of our own on May 3 so make sure to book a meeting and come by to chat about your K8s use case anytime during the week.

  • SD Times news digest: Android GPU Compute changes, Xilinx’s Kria Portfolio, and ELISA Project expands its global ecosystem

    The ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) Project announced that Codethink, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, NVIDIA and Red Hat joined its ecosystem.

    The project aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems

    “The primary challenge is selecting Linux components and features that can be evaluated for safety and identifying gaps where more work is needed to evaluate safety sufficiently,” said Shuah Khan, Chair of the ELISA Project Technical Steering Committee and Linux Fellow at the Linux Foundation. “We’ve taken on this challenge to make it easier for companies to build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications by exploring potential methods to enable engineers to answer that question for their specific system.”

  • Linux, Lyft establish mobile developers collective to build enterprise-grade apps

    To stimulate better collaboration amongst mobile developers, the Linux Foundation has founded one of its first open-source platforms centered around mobile app development. The new group is known as the Mobile Native Foundation, and it will be a collaborative IT infrastructure intended at enhancing the building of Android and iOS smartphone applications.

DragonFlyBSD 6.0 To Be Released Soon

Filed under
BSD

It's been over one year already since the debut of DragonFlyBSD 5.8 while fortunately DragonFlyBSD 6.0 will be here soon for this popular BSD operating system.

DragonFlyBSD 6.0 is overdue for release compared to their usual bi-annual release rhythm. One of the hold ups towards the end of last year was a DRI bug that was delaying things. DragonFlyBSD 6.0 is the version number rather than 5.10 since that is an "annoying version number".

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Interview with Michael Lucas *BSD, Unix, IT and other books author

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

Michael Lucas is a famous IT book author. Perhaps best know for FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and Unix book series. He worked as a system administrator for many years and has now become a full-time book writer. Lately, I did a quick Q and A with Michael about his journey as a professional book author and his daily workflow for writing books.

[...]

In 1995, I was responsible for a couple of heavily loaded client-facing nameservers. Most operating systems folded under the load. I worked nights. When a nameserver imploded, I got called and had to fix it. This was before virtualization, before remote consoles, before VPNs. My Internet access at home was a 33.6kB dialup, and I could either be on the phone or connected to the network. I tried Linux, SunOS, UnixWare. I even tried a Windows NT nameserver, out of sheer desperation.

The day I installed a FreeBSD nameserver, I got a glorious ten hours of uninterrupted sleep.

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We have released LibreSSL 3.3.2

Filed under
Security
BSD

The LibreSSL project continues improvement of the codebase to reflect modern, safe programming practices. We welcome feedback and improvements from the broader community. Thanks to all of the contributors who helped make this release possible.

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OpenSSH 8.6 was released on 2021-04-19

Filed under
Security
BSD

This release contains mostly bug fixes.

New features
------------

* sftp-server(8): add a new limits@openssh.com protocol extension that allows a client to discover various server limits, including maximum packet size and maximum read/write length.

* sftp(1): use the new limits@openssh.com extension (when available) to select better transfer lengths in the client.

* sshd(8): Add ModuliFile keyword to sshd_config to specify the location of the "moduli" file containing the groups for DH-GEX.

* unit tests: Add a TEST_SSH_ELAPSED_TIMES environment variable to enable printing of the elapsed time in seconds of each test.

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Audiocasts/Shows: BSDNow, FLOSS Weekly, TLLTS and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • BSDNow 398: Coordinated Mars Time

    FreeBSD 13.0 Full Desktop Experience, FreeBSD on ARM64 in the Cloud, Plan 9 from Bell Labs in Cyberspace, Inferno is open source as well, NetBSD hits donation milestone, grep returns (standard input) on FreeBSD, Random Programming Challenge, OpenBSD Adds Support for Coordinated Mars Time (MTC) and more

  • FLOSS Weekly 625: Endless Sky - Jonathan Steck

    Jonathan Steck joins Jonathan Bennett and Dan Lynch talk to about Endless Sky, an open source video game reminiscent of Elite and Escape velocity, and one that even hearkens back to Spacewar! On FLOSS Weekly, Steck and the show hosts talk about the game itself and the community around it. The project has attracted an interesting bunch of contributors, mainly through its presence on Steam as a free game. There are several challenges the project has overcome, from the sabbatical of the founder, to managing the continued growth and interest in the game. The game is addictive, and the conversation is just as good.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 902

    retro computing, sound cards, mumble woes

  • Conflict | Coder Radio 409

    We visit an alternate reality where Epic wins in their fight against Apple, COBOL reigns supreme, and the halls of great Jedi Temple are lined with Object-C developers.

  • KDE Neon | Plasma Desktop Linux Distrubution

FreeBSD 13.0-RELEASE Announcement

Filed under
BSD

The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 13.0-RELEASE. This is the first release of the stable/13 branch.

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FreeBSD 13.0 – Full Desktop Experience

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

With the release of FreeBSD 13.0 on the horizon, I wanted to see how it shapes up on my Lenovo T450 laptop. Previous major releases on this laptop, using it as a workstation, felt very rough around the edges but with 13, it feels like the developers got it right.

I like to keep things simple when it comes to a desktop operating system so the description below is how I went from a fresh install of FreeBSD 13.0RC1 to a working environment that is based on using the XFCE4 desktop experience.

The FreeBSD install process is simple and well documented in other official locations, so I am not going to repeat that here. However, some of the configuration items that I did select was to use ZFS on Root, encrypted swap and disabled all services (this is a workstation, not a server).

Once the machine had been rebooted, we need to set it up so that suspend/resume works correctly (and tests as such) and enable power management. The main issue that people have getting the resume part of the suspend/resume to work is not having the drm or xf86 drivers loaded that are applicable to the onboard graphics.

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Linux, NetBSD, and OpenBSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD

  • EXT4 With Linux 5.13 Looks Like It Will Support Casefolding With Encryption Enabled - Phoronix

    While EXT4 supports both case-folding for optional case insensitive filenames and does support file-system encryption, at the moment those features are mutually exclusive. But it looks like the upcoming Linux 5.13 kernel will allow casefolding and encryption to be active at the same time.

    Queued this week into the EXT4 file-system's "dev" tree was ext4: handle casefolding with encryption.

  • SiFive FU740 PCIe Support Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.13 - Phoronix

    Arguably the most interesting RISC-V board announced to date is SiFive's HiFive Unmatched with the FU740 RISC-V SoC that features four U74-MC cores and one S7 embedded core. The HiFive Unmatched also has 16GB of RAM, USB 3.2 Gen 1, one PCI Express x16 slot (operating at x8 speeds), an NVMe slot, and Gigabit Ethernet. The upstream kernel support for the HiFive Unmatched and the FU740 SoC continues.

    With the Linux 5.12 cycle there was the start of mainlining SiFive FU740 SoC support and that work is continuing for the upcoming Linux 5.13 cycle.

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  • The state of toolchains in NetBSD

                     

                       

    While FreeBSD and OpenBSD both switched to using LLVM/Clang as their base system compiler, NetBSD picked a different path and remained with GCC and binutils regardless of the license change to GPLv3. However, it doesn't mean that the NetBSD project endorses this license, and the NetBSD Foundation's has issued a statement about its position on the subject.

                       

    Realistically, NetBSD is more or less tied to GCC, as it supports more architectures than the other BSDs, some of which will likely never be supported in LLVM.

                       

    As of NetBSD 9.1, the latest released version, all supported platforms have recent versions of GCC (7.5.0) and binutils (2.31.1) in the base system. Newer (and older!) versions of GCC can be installed via Pkgsrc, and the following packages are available, going all the way back to GCC 3.3.6: [...]

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  • Review: OpenBSD 6.8 on 8th Gen Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 13.3"

                     

                       

    10 days ago, I bought this X1 Carbon. I immediately installed OpenBSD on it. It took me a few days to settle in and make myself at home, but here are my impressions.

                       

    This was the smoothest experience I've had getting OpenBSD set up the way I like it. The Toshiba NB305 in 2011 was a close second, but the Acer I used between these two laptops required a lot more tweaking of both hardware and kernel to get it to feel like home.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • How to set Proxy and Update FreeBSD

    FreeBSD is an operating system used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms A large community has continually developed it for more than thirty years. Its advanced networking, security, and storage features have made FreeBSD the platform of choice for many of the busiest web sites and most pervasive embedded networking and storage devices.

  • How to install software in FreeBSD (mc example install)

    FreeBSD is an operating system used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms A large community has continually developed it for more than thirty years. Its advanced networking, security, and storage features have made FreeBSD the platform of choice for many of the busiest web sites and most pervasive embedded networking and storage devices.

  • Link-o-Rama: Google testing new targeted ads, FreeBSD’s big oops, Henry Rollins’ record habits & Robyn Hitchcock’s essential records

    More than 20 years ago, when Linux was still wet around the ears, I remember a NetBSD proponent talking my ear off about how Linux was doomed (doomed!) and that the *BSDs would “win” in the long run because their code was more elegant and so forth. I’m still waiting… (To be fair, not all of my predictions and hot takes from the late 90s / early 00s were all that accurate, either.)

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More in Tux Machines

Dev kit and module run Linux on Zynq Ultrascale+

Topic Embedded has launched a “Florida Plus” dev kit that runs Linux on its Zynq Ultrascale+ based Miami MPSoC Plus module. Meanwhile, Aries announced it has begun distributing Topic’s Zynq-based Miami modules. Netherlands-based Topic Embedded Systems has been around for 20 years doing FPGA work, with the last decade focused primarily on manufacturing Linux-driven Xilinx Zynq based modules. Last week, Topic announced an open-spec Florida Plus Development Kit that showcases its top-of-the-line Miami MPSoC Plus compute module, which features the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. system-on-chip. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Install Mosh Shell as SSH Alternative on Linux Desktop

    Using an SSH client tool is always helpful and handy for the system administrator and the remote users. In the conventional SSH clients, you may find some network and auto session logout issues. As a system admin, you already realize the importance of the CLI-based remote SSH client. To solve frequent logout, lagging, and packet loss issues, you can install the Mosh SSH as an SSH alternative on Linux. The Mosh stands for the Mobile shell, which is a command-line-based secure shell client for Linux. It doesn’t require a stale and static IP address to establish the connection; moreover, the Mosh SSH shell client is also compatible with mobile devices.

  • New Linux Publication Released: How Linux Works, 3rd Edition: What Every Superuser Should Know by Brian Ward

    I am very excited about this publication not only because it is a great book covering such a large set of Linux-related topics but also because I helped with the technical review.

  • How to install the NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu 21.04

    The objective is to install the NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo Linux and switch from a opensource Nouveau driver to the proprietary Nvidia driver. To install Nvidia driver on other Linux distributions, follow our Nvidia Linux Driver guide.

  • How to install Blender 2.92 on Deepin 20.2

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Blender 2.92 on Deepin 20.2.

  • How to install Funkin' High Effort Ugh mod on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Funkin' High Effort Ugh mod on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below. If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

GNU Project: GCC 11.1 Release Candidate and Cryptographic Algorithms GnuTLS

  • GCC 11.1 Release Candidate available from gcc.gnu.org
    The first release candidate for GCC 11.1 is available from
    
     https://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/11.1.0-RC-20210420/
     ftp://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/11.1.0-RC-20210420
    
    and shortly its mirrors.  It has been generated from git revision
    r11-8265-g246abba01f302eb453475b650ba839ec905be76d.
    
    I have so far bootstrapped and tested the release candidate on
    x86_64-linux and i686-linux.  Please test it and report any issues to
    bugzilla.
    
    If all goes well, I'd like to release 11.1 on Tuesday, April 27th.
    
  • GCC 11.1 RC Released, GCC 12 In Development On Trunk

    The release candidate to GCC 11.1 as the first stable release of GCC 11 is now available for testing. If all goes well GCC 11.1.0 will officially debut next week while GCC 12 is now in development with their latest Git code. Red Hat's Jakub Jelinek announced the GCC 11.1 release candidate today, which has been bootstrapped and tested so far for i686 and x86_64 Linux. He is hoping to release GCC 11.1 officially next week if all goes well.

  • Daiki Ueno: AF_ALG support in GnuTLS

    The Linux kernel implements a set of cryptographic algorithms to be used by other parts of the kernel. These algorithms can be accessed through the internal API; notable consumers of this API are encrypted network protocols such as IPSec and WireGuard, as well as data encryption as in fscrypt. The kernel also provides an interface for user-space programs to access the kernel crypto API. GnuTLS has recently gained a new crypto backend that uses the kernel interface in addition to the user-space implementation. There are a few benefits of having it. The most obvious one is performance improvement: while the existing user-space assembly implementation has comparable performance to the in-kernel software emulation, the kernel crypto implementation also enables workload offloading to hardware accelerators, such as Intel QAT cards. Secondly, it brings support for a wider variety of CPU architectures: not only IA32 and AArch64, but also PowerPC and s390. The last but not least is that it could be used as a potential safety net for the crypto algorithms implementation: deferring the crypto operations to the kernel means that we could have an option to workaround any bugs or compliance (such as FIPS140) issues in the library.

More JingPad A1 Linux tablet detailed revealed ahead of crowdfunding

The JingPad A1 is a tablet with an 11 inch AMOLED touchscreen display, support for digital pen input, and a detachable keyboard that lets you use the tablet like a laptop. It also has an operating system that’s designed for both tablet and laptop mode. That’s because the JingPad A1 will be the first tablet to ship with JingOS, an operating system developed by Chinese company Jingling that’s a custom Linux distribution designed for tablets but capable of running desktop applications (as well as some Android applications). First unveiled in March, the tablet will go up for pre-order soon through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. Jingling hasn’t announced a price yet, but an Indiegogo preview page is now live, and folks who sign up with an email address may be able to save 40-percent when orders open up in May. Read more