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BSD

BSD: Capsicum Project in FreeBSD and Elisa in FreeBSD

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BSD
  • Capsicum

    I spent a couple of years evangelizing about Capsicum. I wrote many articles about it. So, it is very natural that I would also like to update you on this blog about the progress of the Capsicum project in FreeBSD, because this is what I’m doing in my free time. That said I feel that this blog wouldn’t be completed without some introduction to what Capsicum is. This post should fill this gap. Over the next weeks and months we will extend this topic and discuss different parts of Capsicum. Without further introduction let’s jump into the topic

  • Elisa in FreeBSD

    Elisa (product page, release announcements blog) is a music player designer for excellent integration into the KDE Plasma desktop (but of course it runs everywhere, including some non-Free platforms). I had used it a few times, but had not gotten around to packaging it. So today I threw together a FreeBSD port of Elisa, and you’ll be able to install it from official packages whenever the package cluster gets around to it.

FreeBSD 12.0 Beta 4 Released, Allows NVIDIA Driver To Work With 64-bit Linux Emulation

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BSD

One change catching our attention are to FreeBSD's linux/linux64 kernel modules for its Linux compatibility code. With changes that had been sought since early 2016, the FreeBSD NVIDIA proprietary driver should now play nicely with the linux64 module. This is necessary for FreeBSD 64-bit CUDA support with NVIDIA's driver. Previously the FreeBSD CUDA support played nicely with 32-bit, but that was dropped in CUDA 9.0. This should help too for other 64-bit Linux emulation code for working with NVIDIA's binary graphics driver.

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FreeBSD 12.0 Faces A Minor Setback But Still Should Be Out Ahead Of Christmas

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BSD

The big FreeBSD 12.0 release still is expected to happen in December but will be a bit later than originally planned.

The FreeBSD release engineering team has decided that a fourth beta is warranted before branching the FreeBSD 12 code and moving onto the release candidate phase. There already has been a number of alpha releases and three betas, but due to a boot time issue and allowing more time for ARM/ARM64 builds to complete, a fourth beta has been penciled into the schedule.

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Also: malloc.conf replaced with a sysctl

FreeBSD 12.0-BETA3 Now Available

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 12.0-BETA3 Now Available

    The third BETA build of the 12.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

  • FreeBSD 12.0 Beta 3 Brings Bhyve Update, NUMA Disabling Via sysctl

    Another weekly beta release of FreeBSD 12 is now available for testing with the official release still being several weeks out.

    FreeBSD 12.0 Beta 3 now allows NUMA support to be disabled via a new vm.numa.disabled sysctl tunable, the Bhyve hypervisor can now allow the VNC server to listen for incoming IPv6 connections, various hardware driver updates, and SPE exception handling for PowerPCSPE architecture.

OpenBSD on a Laptop

Filed under
BSD
HowTos

It's been almost a year since I've posted any articles, and I'm afraid I have a confession to make...I've joined the dark side! Most people know my site from the How to Run a Mail Server post, which targeted FreeBSD. A few months ago, I converted all that infrastructure to an automated OpenBSD platform. Turns out OpenBSD was so much easier, I decided to run it as a desktop too.

You won't find nearly as many online resources about setting up OpenBSD, because honestly, you really don't need any. Unlike much of Linux and FreeBSD, the included manuals are high quality, coherent, and filled with practical examples. You also need very little third party software to do basic tasks—almost everything you need is well-integrated into the base system.

You'll notice that many features that require toil to achieve on FreeBSD, such as suspend on lid close, working volume buttons, and decent battery life, work out of the box on OpenBSD. You can tell the developers actually use this thing on their personal devices.

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GhostBSD 18.10 Now Available

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BSD

GhostBSD 18.10 is our first official release of GhostBSD with TrueOS under the hood, and the official desktop is MATE. However, in the future, there might be some community release, but for now, there is no community released yet.

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Also: GhostBSD 18.10 Released, Built Off FreeBSD-Based TrueOS With MATE Desktop

BSD: Review of 'Absolute FreeBSD', Introducing the OpenBSD Virtualization FAQ

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BSD
  • Book Review: Absolute FreeBSD (3rd Edition)

    FreeBSD is a free and open source operating system for many different kinds of computers. FreeBSD's based upon BSD, the version of UNIX developed at the University of California, Berkeley. FreeBSD is an alternative to Linux or Windows-based system. You can run almost all apps written in Perl, Python, PHP and other programming languages. FreeBSD heavily used by Netflix, EMC, IBM, Juniper, NetApp, Apple, Sony, and others. Absolute FreeBSD (3rd ed) book aims to be the complete guide to FreeBSD. Let us see why Michael W. Lucas' FreeBSD system administration books so favorite among Unix lovers.

  • Introducing the OpenBSD Virtualization FAQ

    Now getting started with OpenBSD virtualization has become even easier: The OpenBSD FAQ has a new Virtualization section, written mainly by Solene Rapenne (solene@) and added to the site in this commit, that offers an introduction to the concepts as well as instructions on how to get started with vmm(4).

GhostBSD18.10 RC3 is Available for testing

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BSD

This third release candidate of GhostBSD 18.10 is the third official testing release of GhostBSD with TrueOS under the hood. The official desktop of GhostBSD is MATE. However, in the future, there might be an XFCE community release, but for now, there is no community release yet.

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Compilers News: GCC and LLVM

Filed under
Development
GNU
BSD
  • The D Language Front-End Finally Merged Into GCC 9

    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) has a new language front-end! The D language support has finally been merged.

    The D language support for GCC has long been sought after with over the past two years going through several revisions. Back in June of 2017 is when the GCC Steering Committee approved of adding the D front-end but it's taken more than a year to get the code in adequate shape for merging.

    Last month there was a renewed push for D in GCC 9 while on Sunday evening that front-end and related code was finally merged to mainline GCC.

  • Six Years After Launch, AMD Piledriver CPU Tuning Gets Reworked In LLVM Clang

    Six years after AMD introduced "Piledriver" as the successor to the original Bulldozer CPUs, the LLVM Clang compiler is seeing a revised scheduling model for these processors that can yield faster performance of generated code targeting this older class of AMD CPUs.

    Piledriver cores ended up a range of CPUs from the FX-8300 series through the FX-9590, many APUs including the A10-6800K, more than a dozen mobile parts, and also some Opteron CPUs. Piledriver as a reminder was based on a 32nm SOI process, offered better IPC over the original Bulldozer microarchitecture, bumped the clock speeds, and other incremental improvements.

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OSS Leftovers

  • OpenStack regroups
    Only a few years ago, OpenStack was the hottest open-source project around, with a bustling startup ecosystem to boot. The project, which gives enterprises the tools to run the equivalent of AWS in their own private data centers, ran into trouble as it tried to tackle too many individual projects at the same time and enterprises took longer than expected to adopt it. That meant many a startup floundered or was acquired before it was able to gain traction while the nonprofit foundation that manages the project started to scale back its big tent approach and refocused on its core services.
  • SD Times news digest: Docker and MuleSoft’s partnership, ActiveState’s open-source language automation category, and Instana’s automatic Python instrumentation
    Docker and MuleSoft have announced a new partnership to modernize applications and accelerate digital transformation. As part of the partnership, the companies will work together to deliver new capabilities for legacy apps with APIs, legacy apps without APIs and new apps created in Docker. In addition, MuleSoft’s Anypoint platform will be combined with Docker Enterprise.
  • ActiveState Creates Open Source Language Automation Category
  • New open source cloud discovery tool arrives from Twistlock
    Cloud Discovery connects to cloud providers' native platform APIs to discover services such as container registries, managed Kubernetes platforms, and serverless services, and requires only read permissions. Other key features include:
  • Google Open-Sources "Amber" Multi-API Shader Test Framework
    The newest open-source graphics project out of Google is called Amber and it's a multi-API shader testing framework focused on capturing and communicating of shader bugs. Google's Amber tries to make it easier to capture/communicate shader bugs with a scripting-based workflow. The captured shaders can be in binary form, SPIR-V assembly, or a higher-level shading language. Amber is currently focused on supporting the Vulkan and Dawn graphics APIs.
  • Microsoft allies with Facebook on AI software [Ed: Evil likes/attracts evil. Now they can do their crimes together while blaming "AI". Longtime Microsoft propagandist Jordan Novet has decided to add the Microsoft lie (PR campaign) "Microsoft loves Linux" (in photo form) to an article that has nothing to do with Linux.]
  • Microsoft alliance with Facebook signals shift in AI approach

Android Leftovers

Security Leftovers

Devices: Adding Linux to A PDP-11, Adding GNU/Linux Software to Chrome OS, and Adding Ubuntu to Android

  • Adding Linux To A PDP-11
    The UNIBUS architecture for DEC’s PDPs and Vaxxen was a stroke of genius. If you wanted more memory in your minicomputer, just add another card. Need a drive? Plug it into the backplane. Of course, with all those weird cards, these old UNIBUS PDPs are hard to keep running. The UniBone is the solution to this problem. It puts Linux on a UNIBUS bridge, allowing this card to serve as a memory emulator, a test console, a disk emulator, or any other hardware you can think of. The key to this build is the BeagleBone, everyone’s second-favorite single board computer that has one feature the other one doesn’t: PRUs, or a programmable real-time unit, that allows you to blink a lot of pins very, very fast. We’ve seen the BeagleBone be used as Linux in a terminal, as the rest of the computer for an old PDP-10 front panel and as the front end for a PDP-11/03.
  • Chrome OS Linux apps will soon be able to access your entire Downloads folder and Google Drive
    Google is working hard to turn Chrome OS into more than just a browser, but a real, functional operating system for consumers of all kinds. Most recently, they’ve invited developers to the platform with Linux app support that enables all of their tools, including Android Studio, to work as expected. Soon, your Chrome OS and Google Drive files will be even more accessible to your Linux apps. [...] According to a new commit on the Chromium Gerrit, that’s all about to change. The commit primarily pertains to a new dialog that will be shown when sharing ‘root’ folders like My Drive or Downloads with your Chrome OS Linux apps (internally known as Crostini) container. The dialog is intended to forewarn you that sharing a root folder is a bit more serious than just sharing a sub-folder, and to be sure you know what you’re doing.
  • Samsung Note 9 and Tab S4 owners can run a full Ubuntu Desktop – Linux on Dex
    We have come a long way as an industry and if this is not one of the biggest milestones in personal computing, I don’t know what else qualifies. Over the past decade of smartphones being around, we have seen an exponential increase in the power that our smartphones pack. I mean, flagships from the past few years spot more RAM and processing power than most laptops out there, but the small form factor has always been a hindrance to the utilization of this power. I mean you can only do so much on a 5.5-inch display. Samsung has launched its “Linux on Dex” app in beta and is inviting geeks and tinkerers to register and help test and develop it. The app lets owners of specific Samsung devices “run” a full Ubuntu desktop on their device alongside Android.