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BSD

OpenBSD 6.0 to be released September 1, 2016

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BSD

Theo de Raadt (deraadt@) has updated the (in-progress) OpenBSD 6.0 release page to indicate that release will occur earlier than is usual...

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LLVM and DragonFlyBSD

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BSD

OpenBSD 6.0 tightens security by losing Linux compatibility

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Security
BSD

OpenBSD, one of the more prominent variants of the BSD family of Unix-like operating systems, will be released at the beginning of September, according to a note on the official OpenBSD website.

Often touted as an alternative to Linux. OpenBSD is known for the lack of proprietary influence on its software and has garnered a reputation for shipping with better default security than other OSes and for being highly vigilant (some might say strident) about the safety of its users. Many software router/firewall projects are based on OpenBSD because of its security-conscious development process.

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A Grand Experiment

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
BSD

The latest debacle over the "forced" upgrade to Windows 10 and Apple's increasingly locked-in ecosystem has got me thinking. Do I really need to use a proprietary operating system to get work done? And while I'm at it, do I need to use commercial cloud services to store my data?

I've always used Linux since the first time I tried installing Slackware in the mid-90s. In 1998 we were the first national TV show to install Linux live (Red Hat). And I've often advocated Ubuntu to people with older computers. I usually have at least one computer running Linux around, in the past couple of years Dell XPS laptops have been great choices. And a couple of months ago I bought a 17" Oryx laptop from System76, an Ubuntu system integrator, for use in studio.

But as time went by, even Ubuntu began to seem too commercial to me, and I've migrated to community supported Debian testing and the Arch-based Antergos distros for everything. (i use Antergos on my Oryx on the shows.)

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Also: Microsoft lays off remaining handful of Microsoft Press staff

Leftovers: BSD

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BSD
  • Why we use OpenBSD at VidiGuard

    At VidiGuard, we care a lot about physical security. In fact, it’s our job. But equally important to physical security is the security of our customers’ data. We also need a robust, reliable platform that can run with minimal interaction. To make both of those happen, we employ OpenBSD in our on-premise equipment and our data infrastructure. Why OpenBSD?

  • Building a home firewall: review of pfsense

    For some time now, I’ve been running OpenWRT on an RT-N66U device. I initially set that because I had previously been using my Debian-based file/VM server as a firewall, and this had some downsides: every time I wanted to reboot that, Internet for the whole house was down; shorewall took a fair bit of care and feeding; etc.

    I’ve been having indications that all is not well with OpenWRT or the N66U in the last few days, and some long-term annoyances prompted me to search out a different solution. I figured I could buy an embedded x86 device, slap Debian on it, and be set.

  • LLVM 3.9 Has Been Branched, LLVM 4.0 Will Be Up Next

    Right on schedule the LLVM 3.9 code was branched today in preparation for its formal release next month.

    LLVM 3.9 is another six-month feature update to the LLVM compiler stack. We'll have more on its features and performance in the weeks ahead, in addition to the LLVM Clang benchmarks we already do daily with it at LinuxBenchmarking.com.

NAS4Free 10.3.0.3 Embedded Storage Distribution Out Now Based on FreeBSD 10.3

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BSD

The developers of the NAS4Free open-source and free embedded storage BSD-based distribution for GNU/Linux, Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and other UNIX-like systems, announced the release of NAS4Free 10.3.0.3.

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FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches Beta

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BSD

BSD fans looking to do some testing this weekend can try out the beta of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0.

FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the tentative release notes and what's new guide.

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PC-BSD's Lumina Desktop Now In Beta For v1.0

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BSD

The Lumina Desktop Environment has made available their v1.0 beta release of the Qt-written desktop.

PC-BSD developers and others continue working on Lumina as an alternative, lightweight desktop environment. While originating in the BSD world, Lumina continues to be designed to work on any Unix-like OS and is licensed under a 3-clause BSD license. Should you not be familiar with Lumina from our past articles, visit Lumina-Desktop.org to learn more about the project.

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BSD Leftovers

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.0 Alpha 5 Released, Schedule So Far Going On Track

    The fifth alpha release of the huge FreeBSD 11.0 operating system update is now available for testing.

    FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a wide range of other enhancements outlined via the in-progress release notes.

  • DragonFly's HAMMER2 File-System Sees Some Improvements

    The HAMMER2 file-system is going on four years in development by the DragonFlyBSD crew, namely by its founder Matthew Dillon. It's still maturing and taking longer than anticipated, but this is yet another open-source file-system.

FreeBSD 11 Alpha 1 — New Features Coming To This Open Source OS

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BSD

For those unfamiliar with FreeBSD, it is considered one of the few operating systems left to be true UNIX. It is a direct descendant of the BELL/AT&T labs UNIX. Much of the software available for Linux is also available for FreeBSD as well, including Gnome and KDE desktop environments and much more user and server software. Despite the amount of software available, it is often thought of as an obscure system with a rather small software library. This is simply

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More in Tux Machines

Conversation With Jonathan Thomas of OpenShot

I think my initial fascination with Linux was based on rebuilding all my old, broken computers laying around my office/garage. I was having a ton of fun, pulling components out of old computers, installing various distros and seeing what worked/didn’t work. And then there was the 3D desktop cube, which was pretty awesome! Pretty soon I had built my kids their own computer, with “safe” web-browsing, education games, etc. It was many months of playing around with Linux before I learned about Python and started slowly getting more into the programming side of things. Read more

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Linux Is Coming Soon with Mesa 3D 12.0, Latest KDE Goodies

Kate Lebedeff from the OpenMandriva project informed Softpedia about the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) development build of the upcoming OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 operating system. Read more

Korora 24 "Sheldon" Linux Is Available Only for 64-bit PCs, Based on Fedora 24

After a long wait, the Korora 24 GNU/Linux distribution has been released, based, as its version number suggests, on many of the technologies included in the popular Fedora 24 operating system. Read more

Women In Tech: Jane Silber, CEO Of Canonical

When I sat down to interview Jane Silber, CEO of Canonical, I don’t think it was lost on either of us that our ability to chat freely even though I was in my office in the middle of the U.S. and she was in her office in London, England had everything to do with cloud computing, an area in which her company does brisk business. Silber has been running Canonical (maker of Ubuntu, among a great many other software products) in one form or another for well over a decade at this point, first as COO and now CEO. She answers questions thoughtfully, with carefully chosen words; even though I’m sure I’m not the first journalist to ask her some of the below questions (maybe not even the first one this week), she had no canned responses, and she never veered off course to discuss her own agenda. There were no preset talking points; simply, I asked questions, and she answered them. Read more