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BSD

BSD: OpenBSD/NetBSD on FreeBSD and Upcoming OpenZFS Developer Summit 2018

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD/NetBSD on FreeBSD using grub2-bhyve

    When I was writing a blog post about the process title, I needed a couple of virtual machines with OpenBSD, NetBSD, and Ubuntu. Before that day I mainly used FreeBSD and Windows with bhyve. I spent some time trying to set up an OpenBSD using bhyve and UEFI as described here. I had numerous problems trying to use it, and this was the day I discovered the grub2-bhyve tool, and I love it!

    The grub2-bhyve allows you to load a kernel using GRUB bootloader. GRUB supports most of the operating systems with a standard configuration, so exactly the same method can be used to install NetBSD or Ubuntu. [...]

  • OpenZFS Developer Summit 2018

    The sixth annual OpenZFS Developer Summit took place September 10th and 11th in San Francisco, California with an expanded focus on non-technical topics like community development and cross-project coordination. It also marked the “light at the end of the tunnel” status of several long-term OpenZFS features, notably dRAID, the distributed spare technology originally developed by Intel. [...]

LLVM 7.0.0 is Ready

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • [llvm-dev] [7.0.0 Release] The final tag is in

    The final version of 7.0.0 has been tagged from the branch at r342370. It is identical to rc3 modulo release notes and docs changes.

  • LLVM 7.0 Is Ready For Release

    The LLVM/Clang 7.0 release had been running a bit behind schedule and warranted a third release candidate, but this week LLVM 7.0.0 is now ready to ship.

    Release manager Hans Wennborg announced minutes ago on the mailing list that the 7.0.0 release has been tagged in their source tree. This ends up being the same as last week's 7.0-RC3 except for release notes and documentation updates.

  • LLVM Developers Still Discussing SPIR-V Support Within Clang

    One of the features that didn't materialize for LLVM / Clang 7.0 is the SPIR-V support within the compiler toolchain.

    While there has been a SPIR-V / LLVM translator out-of-tree and various developers at different vendors have been discussing for months the prospects of adding SPIR-V intermediate representation support to LLVM/Clang, it has yet to materialize.

    The latest developer discussion is to have a roundtable talk on the SPIR-V integration at the 2018 LLVM Developers' Meeting. This year the LLVM Developers' Meeting is happening at the San Jose Convention Center from 17 to 18 October.

Doing One Thing, Well: The UNIX Philosophy

Filed under
OS
GNU
BSD

The Unix operating system has been around for decades, and it and its lookalikes (mainly Linux) are a critical part of the computing world. Apple’s operating system, macOS, is Unix-based, as are Solaris and BSD. Even if you’ve never directly used one of these operating systems, at least two-thirds of all websites are served by Unix or Unix-like software. And, if you’ve ever picked up a smart phone, chances are it was running either a Unix variant or the Linux-driven Android. The core reason that Unix has been so ubiquitous isn’t its accessibility, or cost, or user interface design, although these things helped. The root cause of its success is its design philosophy.

Good design is crucial for success. Whether that’s good design of a piece of software, infrastructure like a railroad or power grid, or even something relatively simple like a flag, without good design your project is essentially doomed. Although you might be able to build a workable one-off electronics project that’s a rat’s nest of wires, or a prototype of something that gets the job done but isn’t user-friendly or scalable, for a large-scale project a set of good design principles from the start is key.

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Compilers: LLVM and compiler as a shared library

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • LLVM 7.0 RC3 Released - The Last Release Candidate

    While only two release candidates were on the schedule for LLVM 7.0, release manager Hans Wennborg today opted for a third RC that he intends to be the final test version before officially releasing the LLVM 7.0.0 collection.

    LLVM 7.0 RC3 was released this morning as the last release candidate and incorporates the recent bug fixing that's went on since the RC2 release at the end of August. Assuming no serious issues are uncovered, this version should be very close to LLVM 7.0.0 final.

  • A Look At The Features Coming With LLVM 7.0 & Clang 7.0

    It's running a few days late, but the LLVM 7.0 release along with sub-projects like Clang 7.0 should be released very soon. Here is a look at some of the features coming to this six-month compiler infrastructure update.

    Below is a look at the highlights for LLVM 7.0. Overall it's been another busy half-year with many additions to the AMDGPU back-end, the new LLVM MCA utility, continued work on the Spectre front, OpenCL C++ support is introduced, function multi-versioning (FMV) finally for Clang, OpenMP 4.5 offloading to NVIDIA NVPTX, and many other compiler infrastructure improvements.

  • The compiler as a shared library

    Since times immemorial, compilers have been run as standalone batch processes. If you have 50 files to compile, then you invoke the compiler 50 times, once on each file. Since each compilation is independent of all others, the work can be parallelised perfectly. This seems like a simple and optimal solution.
    But, as is commonly the case, this is not the whole truth. When compiling code, there are many subtasks that are common to each individual compilation and this causes a lot of duplication of effort. Perhaps the best known case of this are C++ templates. They are parsed and codegenerated for each file that uses them yielding in the same code in dozens of files. Then the linker comes along and throws all but one of them away. There are a bunch of other issues which are discussed in this video from LLVM developer's conference:

BSD Developers and News

Filed under
BSD
  • Pricing Shifts between CreateSpace, IngramSpark, and KDP Print

    Before I go all stabby, though, let’s gather all the information. For an apples-to-apples comparison, I’m setting the CreateSpace price of Spilled Mirovar to $6.99, same as KDP Print and IngramSpark. We really need to make two comparisons. CreateSpace’s Expanded Distribution (CSED) is analogous to IngramSpark, and CreateSpace’s Amazon service is migrating to KDP Print.

  • FreeBSD lockless algorithm - seq

    Those days locking algorithms are critical for operating systems, especially in a multi-threaded world. With time it turns out that classical locks, like mutex, are performance costly. Even when we are using techniques like having reads and writes mutex, synchronizing the state between CPUs can be costly. To optimize some cases, the lockless algorithm started to be used.

    There are multiple places in the kernel where we need to read some variables very often, but there is a small number of cases when we write to them. For such cases, the seq interface was created. [...]

  • How does the process title works?

    Let's start by defining what the title of a process is - in this article, we will understand the name reported by ps(1)/top(1). When we are creating a new process using fork(2) the process inherits the name from its parent. In the scenario when we call exec(2) function we also pass the list of the arguments for a process, which will be treated as a process title. What if we would like to change the title of the process when it's running? It turns out that many operating systems do it in a different way. In this article we will discuss how open source operating systems like FreeBSD, Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, and DragonFlyBSD do it.

  • OpenBSD on disk images

    Users are able to declare disk images as ‘raw’ or ‘qcow2’ using either vmctl and vm.conf. The default disk image format is ‘raw’ if not specified.

BSD: LLVM/Clang and Fuzzing the OpenBSD Kernel

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BSD
  • LLVM/Clang Gets Plumbed For Kernel Memory Sanitizer

    The latest "sanitizer" worked on by Google's developers for the LLVM/Clang compiler infrastructure is a Kernel Memory Sanitizer (KMSAN).

    KMSAN is a special sanitizer compared to the conventional Memory Sanitizer pass that is just focused on kernel memory. Currently this new LLVM pass just supports the Linux x86_64 kernel. Those unfamiliar with the existing MemorySanitizer functionality that already lives within LLVM can see the documentation on this pass.

  • Fuzzing the OpenBSD Kernel

    Anton Lindqvist (anton@) gave a talk at BSD Users Stockholm Meetup #3 on the kernel coverage tracing kit he committed recently. Slides are now available via the OpenBSD Events and Papers page.

NetBSD 7.2 Released

Filed under
BSD
  • NetBSD 7.2 released (August 29, 2018)

    The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 7.2, the second feature update of the NetBSD 7 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons, as well as new features and enhancements.

  • NetBSD 7.2 Released - Backports USB 3.0 Support, Raspberry Pi 3 Compatibility

    While NetBSD 8.0 was released in July with new features like initial USB 3.0 support and UEFI boot-loader support for x86 64-bit hardware, for those not wanting to jump to 8.0 from the 7 series can now enjoy NetBSD 7.2.

    NetBSD 7.2 is a feature update to NetBSD 7 for those not yet or unable to migrate to NetBSD 8.0. NetBSD 7.2 back-ports support for USB 3.0 hardware, enhances the Linux emulation subsystem, provides support for newer Intel WiFi/WLAN cards, adds Raspberry Pi 3 support, offers various USB improvements, and has various bug fixes and stability improvements.

  • NetBSD 7.2 Branch Update Release Brings USB 3.0 and Raspberry Pi 3 Support

    The NetBSD Project has released NetBSD 7.2, which is the second feature update of the NetBSD 7 release branch. This release brings a subset of fixes that were deemed important to security or stability reasons, and several new features and overall enhancements.

    NetBSD is a free and highly portable Unix-like operating system, and is entirely Open Source. It is available for many platforms such as 64-bit x86 servers, to various embedded ARM and MIPS based devices (SoCs).

A Look At DragonFlyBSD's Kernel Tuning Performance On The AMD Threadripper 2990WX

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Last week I posted some initial tests and benchmarks of DragonFlyBSD/FreeBSD on the AMD Threadripper 2990WX. While that went well and the BSDs scale with this 32-core / 64-thread processor better than Windows, lead DragonFly developer Matthew Dillon had picked up a 2990WX system and has been tuning the kernel ever since. Here are some benchmarks looking at some of his recent optimizations.

Hours after that BSD Threadripper testing ended last week, Matthew Dillon landed some more performance tuning/optimizations to benefit the Threadripper 2990WX design. Here are some benchmarks of that original 2990WX support on DragonFlyBSD 5.3-DEVELOPMENT compared to the later daily snapshot.

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BSD: OpenBSD and KDE-FreeBSD

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BSD
  • RSS Feed available for OpenBSD-current special instructions

    I wrote a script generating a RSS file from the content of the page https://www.openbsd.org/faq/current.html

  • Out with the Old ..

       KDE4 ports will be removed from FreeBSD ports on December 31st, 2018

    [...]

    As for KDE4 itself: there haven’t been any upstream KDE4 releases since Applications 17.08.3, and Qt4 upon which it depends is EOL since 2015. The latest KDE Plasma desktop has been available in the official ports tree for over four months (and has been in use by users of Area51 for much much longer).

    So, given that there is a viable upgrade path (although, truth be told, you’ll probably have to re-configure KMail and get used to Falkon), we’ve decided to put a four month deprecation period on all the KDE4 ports. They will be removed at the end of this year, which will free up some maintainence time for chasing the steady stream of updates from the KDE community.

  • KDE4 Being Dropped From FreeBSD At The End Of The Year

    With KDE4 not having seen an upstream release in years and the old KDE4 code beginning to break under newer C++ compilers, the KDE-FreeBSD team has announced a four-month deprecation period after which they are dropping the KDE4 ports from the operating system.

    On 31 December 2018 is when the FreeBSD maintainers of these older KDE packages plan to drop the KDE4 packages from their tree.

BSD: OpenSSH 7.8, OpenBSD Foundation, FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenSSH 7.8 released

    OpenSSH 7.8 is out. It includes a fix for the username enumeration vulnerability; additionally, the default format for the private key file has changed, support for running ssh setuid root has been removed, a couple of new signature algorithms have been added, and more.

  • OpenBSD Foundation gets first 2018 Iridium donation!

    This year the first $100K+ donation came from Handshake (https://www.handshake.org).

  • Remote Access Console using Raspberry Pi 3b+ and FreeBSD

    I have a small homelab and I was looking into some sort of KVM console to be able to access them both locally and remotely instead of moving around VGA cables/serial cables.

    Those are rather expensive so I opted to build my own remote access system. Since all my servers and switch(es) have a serial console that should not be to hard.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • First results of the ROSIN project: Robotics Open-Source Software for Industry
    Open-Source Software for robots is a de-facto standard in academia, and its advantages can benefit industrial applications as well. The worldwide ROS-Industrial initiative has been using ROS, the Robot Operating System, to this end. In order to consolidate Europe’s expertise in advanced manufacturing, the H2020 project ROSIN supports EU’s strong role within ROS-Industrial. It will achieve this goal through three main actions on ROS: ensuring industrial-grade software quality; promoting new business-relevant applications through so-called Focused Technical Projects (FTPs); supporting educational activities for students and industry professionals on the one side conducting ROS-I trainings as well as and MOOCs and on the other hand by supporting education at third parties via Education Projects (EPs).
  • Baidu To Launch World’s First Intelligent Vehicle Infrastructure Cooperative Systems Open Source Solution By End Of 2018
    Baidu Inc. has announced it will launch the Apollo Intelligent Vehicle Infrastructure Cooperative Systems (IVICS) open-source solution by the end of 2018, leveraging its capabilities in autonomous driving to bring together intelligent vehicles and infrastructure to form a “human-vehicle-roadway” interplay – an important step toward developing future intelligent transportation.
  • Versity Open Sources Next Generation Archiving Filesystem
    The ScoutFS project was started in 2016 to address the rapidly growing demand for larger POSIX namespaces and faster metadata processing. The design goal for ScoutFS includes the ability to store up to one trillion files in a single namespace by efficiently distributing metadata handling across a scale out cluster of commodity compute nodes.
  • Moving from Wordpress
  • Epic Clock Clocks The Unix Epoch
    Admit it: when you first heard of the concept of the Unix Epoch, you sat down with a calculator to see when exactly 2³¹-1 seconds would be from midnight UTC on January 1, 1970. Personally, I did that math right around the time my company hired contractors to put “Y2K Suspect” stickers on every piece of equipment that looked like it might have a computer in it, so the fact that the big day would come sometime in 2038 was both comforting and terrifying. [Forklift] is similarly entranced by the idea of the Unix Epoch and built a clock to display it, at least for the next 20 years or so. Accommodating the eventual maximum value of 2,147,483,647, plus the more practical ISO-8601 format, required a few more digits than the usual clock – sixteen to be exact. The blue seven-segment displays make an impression in the sleek wooden case, about which there is sadly no detail in the build log. But the internals are well documented, and include a GPS module and an RTC. The clock parses the NMEA time string from the satellites and syncs the RTC. There’s a brief video below of the clock in action.
  • 3 top Python libraries for data science
    Python's many attractions—such as efficiency, code readability, and speed—have made it the go-to programming language for data science enthusiasts. Python is usually the preferred choice for data scientists and machine learning experts who want to escalate the functionalities of their applications. (For example, Andrey Bulezyuk used the Python programming language to create an amazing machine learning application.) Because of its extensive usage, Python has a huge number of libraries that make it easier for data scientists to complete complicated tasks without many coding hassles. Here are the top 3 Python libraries for data science; check them out if you want to kickstart your career in the field.
  • PortableCL 1.2 Still Coming While POCL 1.3 Will Further Improve Open-Source OpenCL
    It's been a number of months since last having any major news to report on POCL, the "PortableCL" project providing a portable OpenCL/compute implementation that can run on CPUs, select GPUs, and other accelerators. POCL 1.1 from March remains the current stable release while POCL 1.2 has been in the release candidate stage. The POCL 1.2 release candidates began last month with a few highlights like LLVM 7.0 support, device-side printf support, and HWLOC 2.0 library support.

New CloudBees Suite Addresses DevOps Gaps in Software Delivery

CloudBees is bringing a set of products into a new CloudBees Suite that it said will help companies of all sizes streamline the software development process. The new software is set to be announced Sept. 18 at the company’s DevOps World / Jenkins World conference in San Francisco. Jenkins is the open-source version of CloudBees, which is a commercial offering. A central piece of the CloudBees Suite is the CloudBees Core for unified governance of continuous delivery operations and processes used in DevOps. Software pipelines can also use Core to run software pipelines more efficiently in a self-managed way in the cloud or on-premises. Read more Also: CloudBees Announces Availability of Support for Jenkins Open Source

Chrome's Latest

Everything Is File In Linux - Part 1

Divided into 2 parts, in this first part I will introduce the concept that everything is file and present the special devices / dev / null, / dev / zero, / dev / random and / dev / full. Part 2 will be to present didactically interesting features about this, for example, how to turn a file into a partition! Read
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