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BSD

Linux vs. BSD: 10 Key Things You Need to Know

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Both Linux and BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) are free, open-source, and based on Unix. Both systems also use many of the same applications and strive towards the same goal – developing the most stable and reliable operating system.

But, despite all the similarities, these are two distinct operating systems with plenty of differences. Keeping this in mind, we have put together a detailed read going over 10 key differences between Linux vs. BSD to give you a better understanding of the two systems.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, ZaReason Review and BSD Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Ubuntu Podcast S13E31 – Cheers with water

    This week we’ve been upgrading computers and Ebaying stuff. We discuss the Windows Calculator coming to Linux, Microsoft Edge browser coming to Linux, Ubuntu Community Council elections and LibreOffice office getting Yaru icons. We also round up our picks from the general tech news.

  • Review - The Verix 9100 Linux Laptop from ZaReason

    Time for another laptop review! This time I have the Verix 9100 in the studio sent over from ZaReason, an awesome local Linux laptop vendor that has some great hardware available.

  • BSD Now #373: Kyle Evans Interview

    We have an interview with Kyle Evans for you this week. We talk about his grep project, lua and flua in base, as well as bectl, being on the core team and a whole lot of other stuff.

FreeBSD Can Now Be Built From Linux/macOS Hosts, Transition To Git Continues

Filed under
BSD

The FreeBSD project has published their Q3-2020 report on the state of this leading BSD operating system.

Among the highlights they made during the third quarter include:

- The FreeBSD Foundation issued additional grants around WiFi and Linux KPI layer improvements, Linux application compatibility improvements with the Linuxulator, DRM/graphics driver updates, Zstd compression for OpenZFS, online RAID-Z expansion, and modernizing the LLDB target support for FreeBSD.

- FreeBSD Foundation staff members have been working to improve the build infrastructure, ARM64 support, migrating their development tree to Git, rewriting the UNIX domain socket locking, and run-time dynamic linker and kernel ELF loader improvements.

Read more

Original/source:

  • FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - Third Quarter 2020
    FreeBSD Project Quarterly Status Report - Third Quarter 2020
    Introduction
    
       This report covers FreeBSD related projects for the period between July
       and September, and is the third of four planned reports for 2020.
    
       This quarter brings a good mix of additions and changes to the FreeBSD
       Project and community, from a diverse number of teams and people
       covering everything from architectures, continuous integration,
       wireless networking and drivers, over drm, desktop and third-party
       project work, as well as several team reports, along with many other
       interesting subjects too numerous to mention.
    
       As the world is still affected by the epidemic, we hope that this
       report can also serve as a good reminder that there is good work that
       can be done by people working together, even if we're apart.
    
       We hope you'll be as interested in reading it, as we've been in making
       it. Daniel Ebdrup Jensen, on behalf of the quarterly team.
    

[Old] History of FreeBSD: Part 1: UNIX and BSD

Announcing NetBSD 9.1

Filed under
BSD

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 9.1, the first update of the NetBSD 9 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons, as well as new features and enhancements.

Read more

Also: NetBSD 9.1 Released With Parallelized Disk Encryption, Better ZFS, X11 Improvements

OpenBSD 6.8

Filed under
OS
BSD

This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 6.8. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 6.8.

Read more

Also: OpenBSD Marks 25th Anniversary By Releasing OpenBSD 6.8 With POWER 64-Bit Support

FreeBSD 12.2-RC3 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The third RC build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-RC3 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-RC3 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-RC3 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-RC3 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-RC3 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-RC3 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.2-RC2 includes:

o Report what console the boot loader is telling the kernel to use and
  allow toggling between them.

o Allow slow USB devices to be given more time to return their USB
  descriptors.

o Allow using zstd and encryption in the loader.

A list of changes since 12.1-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.2
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.2R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.

Read more

LLVM 11.0.0 Release

Filed under
Development
BSD

I am pleased to announce that LLVM 11 is now finally available.

Get it here: https://releases.llvm.org/download.html#11.0.0

This release is the result of the LLVM community's efforts over the
past six months (up to 2e10b7a3 on trunk plus commits up to 176249bd
on the release/11.x branch).

One highlight is that the Flang Fortran frontend is now part of the release.

And as usual, there are many bug fixes, optimizations, new compiler
diagnostics, etc.

For details, see the release notes:

https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/clang/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/clang/tools/extra/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/flang/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/lld/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/polly/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/projects/libcxx/docs/ReleaseNotes.html

The release would not be possible without the help of everyone who
reported, investigated and fixed bugs, pointed out patches that needed
merging, wrote release notes, etc. Thank you!

Special thanks to the release testers and packagers: Ahsan Saghir, Amy
Kwan, Andrew Kelley, Bernhard Rosenkraenzer, Brian Cain, Diana Picus,
Dimitry Andric, Florian Hahn, Martin Storjö, Michał Górny, Neil
Nelson, Nikita Popov, Rainer Orth, Shoaib Meenai, Sylvestre Ledru, and
Tobias Hieta!

For questions or comments about the release, please contact the
community on the mailing lists.

Onwards to LLVM 12! And take care.

Thanks,
Hans

Read more

Also: LLVM 11.0 Finally Available With Flang Fortran Compiler, Continued C++20 Work

FreeBSD 12.2-RC2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD


The second RC build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-RC2 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-RC2 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-RC2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-RC2 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-RC2 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-RC2 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

Please note, dvd1.iso images for non-x86 architectures that are normally
provided are missing from this release candidate due to human error.
They will be provided for 12.2-RC3 if it is deemed necessary, as well as
12.2-RELEASE.  We apologize for the inconvenience.

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.2-RC1 includes:

o Fix Typo in ng_hci_le_connection_complete_ep struct.

o Set up the firmware flowc for the tid before send_abort_rpl in
  cxgbe(4).

o Fix resuming receive stream to dataset with a mounted clone.

o Fix "zfs receive" of interrupted stream without "-F".

o Set the correct HWCAP for arm64/aarch64.

A list of changes since 12.1-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.2
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.2R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.

Read more

20 Years of The FreeBSD Foundation: Interview With Deb Goodkin, Executive Director

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

Besides Linux distributions, FreeBSD is one such Unix-like operating system, which is free and open source. It is one of the oldest and most popular operating systems descended from the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD).

It is still actively maintained and used on desktops, servers, and embedded devices. As the FreeBSD Foundation recently celebrated its 20th anniversary, we spoke with Deb Goodkin, executive director of the FreeBSD Foundation, about the FreeBSD project.

Read more

FreeBSD 12.2-RC1 Now Available

Filed under
OS
BSD

The first RC build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-RC1 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-RC1 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-RC1 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-RC1 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-RC1 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-RC1 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.2-BETA3 includes:

o OpenSSL 1.1.1h has been merged.

o A fix for UFS hash checking had been added.

o A fix for mmap'd writes in fusefs for writes in direct_io mode had
  been addressed.

o Amazon EC2 AMIs for arm64 have been updated to include ebsvnme-id.

o A fix to NFSv4.1 addressing a locking issue had been addressed.

o Other miscellaneous bug fixes.

A list of changes since 12.1-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.2
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.2R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.2-RC1/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-0b78d5e770bcdeb5e
  eu-north-1 region: ami-0505a8c0c52cfff31
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0c4c09e714e3a6e9f
  eu-west-3 region: ami-00e0dae18af349d16
  eu-west-2 region: ami-06e6d824cb38c5eef
  eu-south-1 region: ami-077bfe44af5272bfc
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0830c03d9511775c6
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-00d438c5be9106d1a
  me-south-1 region: ami-01efb2372fa56c3dd
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0276c6be8130eac10
  sa-east-1 region: ami-075bc30f68a1ef652
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0e6349ad57b6ec50e
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0934a82e2fe4fc324
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-082ef5fab8053e525
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-034eced9d3b0a5fcb
  eu-central-1 region: ami-003b3ecea55e0f34a
  us-east-1 region: ami-046ecf67c8b89748a
  us-east-2 region: ami-02a876a6124ba82ca
  us-west-1 region: ami-076e14c698318f4a1
  us-west-2 region: ami-0397116051898a487

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-04c4b469b7a750631
  eu-north-1 region: ami-0a5c67bbe7b0e8109
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0b1deff23e65431f0
  eu-west-3 region: ami-06968c110a4e11fd1
  eu-west-2 region: ami-04d9f8ba0273d9c53
  eu-south-1 region: ami-08f7137dc70ba9340
  eu-west-1 region: ami-09bdce51a19f36c5a
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0a943f6eb97da5f83
  me-south-1 region: ami-0640892b8fe159522
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0785670f49ecef76f
  sa-east-1 region: ami-07edcd782d88c3d98
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0e1a9498537799d77
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0f946da19f79ace77
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-09080b7b686213e52
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0ca96c25f1ab45e19
  eu-central-1 region: ami-04362b308dedebe83
  us-east-1 region: ami-07ce6d0ad55d93d8a
  us-east-2 region: ami-0367f7addcbc6a4f3
  us-west-1 region: ami-0d5a5ef688e8d1dbd
  us-west-2 region: ami-02cfa06ec6b5efd78

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.2-RC1
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.2-RC1

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 12.2-RC1 Available

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More in Tux Machines

Wine 5.20 Released

The Wine development release 5.20 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - More work on the DSS cryptographic provider.
  - A number of fixes for windowless RichEdit.
  - Support for FLS callbacks.
  - Window resizing in the new console host.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
Read more Also: Wine 5.20 Released With Various Improvements For Running Windows Software On Linux

PostmarketOS update brings HDMI support for the PinePhone and PineTab

When the PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition smartphone began shipping to customers in September it came with a version of the operating system with one important feature missing: HDMI output. So when my phone arrived a few weeks ago I was able to spend some time familiarizing myself with the operating system and I could plug in the included Convergence Dock to use USB accessories including a keyboard, mouse, and storage. But I wasn’t able to connect an external display. Now I can. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

    This tutorial explains Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla computer installation. You will prepare at least two disk partitions, finishing it all in about twenty minutes, and enjoy! Let's start right now.

  • How to install Ubuntu 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu 20.10.

  • How To Install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as some extra required packages by Webmin control panel

  • Running Ironic Standalone on RHEL | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is only going to work if you have access to the OpenStack code. If you are not an OpenStack customer, you are going to need an evaluation entitlement. That is beyond the scope of this article.

  • Introduction to Ironic

    The sheer number of projects and problem domains covered by OpenStack was overwhelming. I never learned several of the other projects under the big tent. One project that is getting relevant to my day job is Ironic, the bare metal provisioning service. Here are my notes from spelunking the code.

  • Adding Nodes to Ironic

    TheJulia was kind enough to update the docs for Ironic to show me how to include IPMI information when creating nodes.

  • Secure NTP with NTS

    Many computers use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize their system clocks over the internet. NTP is one of the few unsecured internet protocols still in common use. An attacker that can observe network traffic between a client and server can feed the client with bogus data and, depending on the client’s implementation and configuration, force it to set its system clock to any time and date. Some programs and services might not work if the client’s system clock is not accurate. For example, a web browser will not work correctly if the web servers’ certificates appear to be expired according to the client’s system clock. Use Network Time Security (NTS) to secure NTP. Fedora 331 is the first Fedora release to support NTS. NTS is a new authentication mechanism for NTP. It enables clients to verify that the packets they receive from the server have not been modified while in transit. The only thing an attacker can do when NTS is enabled is drop or delay packets. See RFC8915 for further details about NTS. NTP can be secured well with symmetric keys. Unfortunately, the server has to have a different key for each client and the keys have to be securely distributed. That might be practical with a private server on a local network, but it does not scale to a public server with millions of clients. NTS includes a Key Establishment (NTS-KE) protocol that automatically creates the encryption keys used between the server and its clients. It uses Transport Layer Security (TLS) on TCP port 4460. It is designed to scale to very large numbers of clients with a minimal impact on accuracy. The server does not need to keep any client-specific state. It provides clients with cookies, which are encrypted and contain the keys needed to authenticate the NTP packets. Privacy is one of the goals of NTS. The client gets a new cookie with each server response, so it doesn’t have to reuse cookies. This prevents passive observers from tracking clients migrating between networks.

  • Comfortable Motion: Absolutely Cursed Vim Scrolling - YouTube

    Have you ever felt like Vim was too useful and thought hey let's change that, well that's what this dev thought and now we have a plugin called comfortable motion that's adds physics based scrolling into vim, what's physics based scrolling you ask. Well it's scrolling that occurs based on how long you hold down the scroll key.

  • Running Cassandra on Fedora 32 | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is not a tutorial. These are my running notes from getting Cassandra to run on Fedora 32. The debugging steps are interesting in their own right. I’ll provide a summary at the end for any sane enough not to read through the rest.

  • Recovering Audio off an Old Tape Using Audacity | Adam Young’s Web Log

    One of my fiorends wrote a bunch of music back in high school. The only remainig recordings are on a casette tape that he produced. Time has not been kind to the recordings, but they are audible…barely. He has a device that produces MP3s from the tape. My job has been to try and get them so that we can understand them well enough to recover the original songs. I have the combined recording on a single MP3. I’ve gone through and noted the times where each song starts and stops. I am going to go through the steps I’ve been using to go from that single long MP3 to an individual recording.

  • Role of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation

    Open source allows anyone to dip their toes in the code, read up on the documentation, and learn everything on their own. That’s how most of us did it, but that’s just the first step. Those who want to have successful careers in building, maintaining, and managing IT infrastructures of companies need more structured hands-on learning with real-life experience. That’s where Linux Foundation’s Training and Certification unit enters the picture. It helps not only greenhorn developers but also members of the ecosystem who seek highly trained and certified engineers to manage their infrastructure. Swapnil Bhartiya sat down with Clyde Seepersad, SVP and GM of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation, to learn more about the Foundation’s efforts to create a generation of qualified professionals.

  • Hetzner build machine

    This is part of a series of posts on compiling a custom version of Qt5 in order to develop for both amd64 and a Raspberry Pi. Building Qt5 takes a long time. The build server I was using had CPUs and RAM, but was very slow on I/O. I was very frustrated by that, and I started evaluating alternatives. I ended up setting up scripts to automatically provision a throwaway cloud server at Hetzner.

Leftovers: Debian, Graphics and Audiocasts

  • Integer Scaling To Come With Linux 5.11 For Intel Graphics Driver - Phoronix

    Going back more than a year there have been Intel "i915" kernel graphics driver patches implementing integer mode scaling support while finally for Linux 5.11 in early 2021 the support will have landed. Intel added integer mode scaling to their Windows graphics driver back in 2019 to provide better clarity when upscaling games (particularly pixel art type content) and other software. The Linux patches materialized in September 2019 for nearest-neighbor integer mode scaling and then seemingly forgotten about. The capability works with Gen11 / Ice Lake and newer.

  • Linux Support for Variable Refresh Rates On Gen12+ Intel GPUs Is On The Way - LinuxReviews

    Intel developer Manasi Navare has submitted a series of patches for the Linux kernel that brings support for variable refresh rates on Intel's latest graphics chips to the Linux kernels i915 driver. The feature is only enabled on Tiger Lake, Sapphire Rapids and newer Intel graphics chips. [...] You do not need a special "Freesync" monitor to use adaptive vertical synchronization, Freesync is just a marketing term used by AMD. The DisplayPort specification has included variable refresh rate (VRR) as an option feature since DP 1.4 and there are many monitors with support for it that are not marketed as "Freesync" or "gaming" monitors. Monitors that are marketed as "Freesync" support the standard DisplayPort VRR protocol so you don't need to use a AMD graphics card to get the benefits of a Freesync monitor. You will soon be able to use one of the very latest Intel CPU's with integrated graphics or one of Intel's upcoming dedicated graphics cards with Freesync monitors on Linux.

  • Salsa updated to GitLab 13.5

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