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BSD

OpenBSD 6.8

Filed under
OS
BSD

This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 6.8. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 6.8.

Read more

Also: OpenBSD Marks 25th Anniversary By Releasing OpenBSD 6.8 With POWER 64-Bit Support

FreeBSD 12.2-RC3 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The third RC build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-RC3 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-RC3 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-RC3 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-RC3 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-RC3 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC3 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-RC3 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-RC3 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.2-RC2 includes:

o Report what console the boot loader is telling the kernel to use and
  allow toggling between them.

o Allow slow USB devices to be given more time to return their USB
  descriptors.

o Allow using zstd and encryption in the loader.

A list of changes since 12.1-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.2
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.2R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.

Read more

LLVM 11.0.0 Release

Filed under
Development
BSD

I am pleased to announce that LLVM 11 is now finally available.

Get it here: https://releases.llvm.org/download.html#11.0.0

This release is the result of the LLVM community's efforts over the
past six months (up to 2e10b7a3 on trunk plus commits up to 176249bd
on the release/11.x branch).

One highlight is that the Flang Fortran frontend is now part of the release.

And as usual, there are many bug fixes, optimizations, new compiler
diagnostics, etc.

For details, see the release notes:

https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/clang/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/clang/tools/extra/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/flang/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/lld/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/tools/polly/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
https://releases.llvm.org/11.0.0/projects/libcxx/docs/ReleaseNotes.html

The release would not be possible without the help of everyone who
reported, investigated and fixed bugs, pointed out patches that needed
merging, wrote release notes, etc. Thank you!

Special thanks to the release testers and packagers: Ahsan Saghir, Amy
Kwan, Andrew Kelley, Bernhard Rosenkraenzer, Brian Cain, Diana Picus,
Dimitry Andric, Florian Hahn, Martin Storjö, Michał Górny, Neil
Nelson, Nikita Popov, Rainer Orth, Shoaib Meenai, Sylvestre Ledru, and
Tobias Hieta!

For questions or comments about the release, please contact the
community on the mailing lists.

Onwards to LLVM 12! And take care.

Thanks,
Hans

Read more

Also: LLVM 11.0 Finally Available With Flang Fortran Compiler, Continued C++20 Work

FreeBSD 12.2-RC2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD


The second RC build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-RC2 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-RC2 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-RC2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-RC2 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-RC2 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC2 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-RC2 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-RC2 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

Please note, dvd1.iso images for non-x86 architectures that are normally
provided are missing from this release candidate due to human error.
They will be provided for 12.2-RC3 if it is deemed necessary, as well as
12.2-RELEASE.  We apologize for the inconvenience.

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.2-RC1 includes:

o Fix Typo in ng_hci_le_connection_complete_ep struct.

o Set up the firmware flowc for the tid before send_abort_rpl in
  cxgbe(4).

o Fix resuming receive stream to dataset with a mounted clone.

o Fix "zfs receive" of interrupted stream without "-F".

o Set the correct HWCAP for arm64/aarch64.

A list of changes since 12.1-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.2
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.2R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.

Read more

20 Years of The FreeBSD Foundation: Interview With Deb Goodkin, Executive Director

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

Besides Linux distributions, FreeBSD is one such Unix-like operating system, which is free and open source. It is one of the oldest and most popular operating systems descended from the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD).

It is still actively maintained and used on desktops, servers, and embedded devices. As the FreeBSD Foundation recently celebrated its 20th anniversary, we spoke with Deb Goodkin, executive director of the FreeBSD Foundation, about the FreeBSD project.

Read more

FreeBSD 12.2-RC1 Now Available

Filed under
OS
BSD

The first RC build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-RC1 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-RC1 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-RC1 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-RC1 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-RC1 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-RC1 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-RC1 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-RC1 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.2-BETA3 includes:

o OpenSSL 1.1.1h has been merged.

o A fix for UFS hash checking had been added.

o A fix for mmap'd writes in fusefs for writes in direct_io mode had
  been addressed.

o Amazon EC2 AMIs for arm64 have been updated to include ebsvnme-id.

o A fix to NFSv4.1 addressing a locking issue had been addressed.

o Other miscellaneous bug fixes.

A list of changes since 12.1-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.2
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.2R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.2-RC1/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-0b78d5e770bcdeb5e
  eu-north-1 region: ami-0505a8c0c52cfff31
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0c4c09e714e3a6e9f
  eu-west-3 region: ami-00e0dae18af349d16
  eu-west-2 region: ami-06e6d824cb38c5eef
  eu-south-1 region: ami-077bfe44af5272bfc
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0830c03d9511775c6
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-00d438c5be9106d1a
  me-south-1 region: ami-01efb2372fa56c3dd
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0276c6be8130eac10
  sa-east-1 region: ami-075bc30f68a1ef652
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0e6349ad57b6ec50e
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0934a82e2fe4fc324
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-082ef5fab8053e525
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-034eced9d3b0a5fcb
  eu-central-1 region: ami-003b3ecea55e0f34a
  us-east-1 region: ami-046ecf67c8b89748a
  us-east-2 region: ami-02a876a6124ba82ca
  us-west-1 region: ami-076e14c698318f4a1
  us-west-2 region: ami-0397116051898a487

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-04c4b469b7a750631
  eu-north-1 region: ami-0a5c67bbe7b0e8109
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0b1deff23e65431f0
  eu-west-3 region: ami-06968c110a4e11fd1
  eu-west-2 region: ami-04d9f8ba0273d9c53
  eu-south-1 region: ami-08f7137dc70ba9340
  eu-west-1 region: ami-09bdce51a19f36c5a
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0a943f6eb97da5f83
  me-south-1 region: ami-0640892b8fe159522
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0785670f49ecef76f
  sa-east-1 region: ami-07edcd782d88c3d98
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0e1a9498537799d77
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0f946da19f79ace77
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-09080b7b686213e52
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0ca96c25f1ab45e19
  eu-central-1 region: ami-04362b308dedebe83
  us-east-1 region: ami-07ce6d0ad55d93d8a
  us-east-2 region: ami-0367f7addcbc6a4f3
  us-west-1 region: ami-0d5a5ef688e8d1dbd
  us-west-2 region: ami-02cfa06ec6b5efd78

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.2-RC1
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.2-RC1

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 12.2-RC1 Available

Audiocasts/Shows: BSDNow, Ubuntu Podcast and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

Default window manager switched to CTWM in NetBSD-current

Filed under
OS
BSD

For more than 20 years, NetBSD has shipped X11 with the "classic" default window manager of twm. However, it's been showing its age for a long time now.

In 2015, ctwm was imported, but after that no progress was made. ctwm is a fork of twm with some extra features - the primary advantages are that it's still incredibly lightweight, but highly configurable, and has support for virtual desktops, as well as a NetBSD-compatible license and ongoing development. Thanks to its configuration options, we can provide a default experience that's much more usable to people experienced with other operating systems.

Read more

Announce: OpenSSH 8.4 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

It is now possible[1] to perform chosen-prefix attacks against the SHA-1 algorithm for less than USD$50K. For this reason, we will be disabling the "ssh-rsa" public key signature algorithm by default in a near-future release.

This algorithm is unfortunately still used widely despite the existence of better alternatives, being the only remaining public key signature algorithm specified by the original SSH RFCs.

The better alternatives include: [...]

Read more

FreeBSD 12.2-BETA3 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The third BETA build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-BETA3 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA3 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA3 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA3 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-BETA3 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-BETA3 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-BETA3 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-BETA3 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.2-BETA3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-BETA3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-BETA3 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-BETA3 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-BETA3 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-BETA3 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-BETA3 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA3 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-BETA3 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-BETA3 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.2-BETA2 includes:

o An installation issue with certctl(8) had been fixed.

o Read/write kstats for ZFS datasets had been added from OpenZFS.

o The default vm.max_user_wired value had been increased.

o The kern.geom.part.check_integrity sysctl(8) had been extended to work
  on GPT partitions.

o The cxgbe(4) firmware had been updated to version 1.25.0.0.

o Fixes for em(4) and igb(4) have been addressed.

o A fix for a potential NFS server crash had been addressed.

o A lock order reversal between NFS server and server-side krpc had been
  addressed.

A list of changes since 12.1-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.2
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.2R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.2-BETA3/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-085b7b5b76d8f88e1
  eu-north-1 region: ami-0d2aaf811cd455b5d
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0c85211fa78c701f5
  eu-west-3 region: ami-08c4c388a19042fb3
  eu-west-2 region: ami-030841f586c12d392
  eu-south-1 region: ami-035fcb9515104859e
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0d5e826250c10cd3a
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-01adc51da511ea8fc
  me-south-1 region: ami-04b2ddbedee42d57a
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0e5b3fc6777cd037d
  sa-east-1 region: ami-08be6405809912e60
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0c954a7d72d7b483c
  ap-east-1 region: ami-04377808aeca208a7
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-02e1e04501c308c0b
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0e9ae229b9ca55677
  eu-central-1 region: ami-002e88141d3b00ee2
  us-east-1 region: ami-0c678fade90df8f04
  us-east-2 region: ami-0967c088cbf208659
  us-west-1 region: ami-0dafae7edc2b2f376
  us-west-2 region: ami-07e4d062d094f5364

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-07c05f6349125a1c7
  eu-north-1 region: ami-041e507b80cb59335
  ap-south-1 region: ami-064907659b94c4823
  eu-west-3 region: ami-000c4a31405be8e94
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0debbacd03a24e562
  eu-south-1 region: ami-0c358e05477cd8b6b
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0fc48c1fef0e255f0
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-06bd715c00c4237b7
  me-south-1 region: ami-04a671aa9611f8a74
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-008e0fa8be5e5c44c
  sa-east-1 region: ami-03c2f687354f086b4
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0647aa16bc62701a3
  ap-east-1 region: ami-08f54406159203762
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-007e5e33e3e4d9152
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0a028a4f5beeed373
  eu-central-1 region: ami-072e09d78436cf375
  us-east-1 region: ami-0218fa187d85dc688
  us-east-2 region: ami-06e8312e95743ce1a
  us-west-1 region: ami-0211983509f75ee9b
  us-west-2 region: ami-038188157f971a711

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.2-BETA3
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.2-BETA3

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

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Games: Godot Engine, Lutris, XCOM, KeeperRL, Ampersat, Europa Universalis and More

  • X11 display server progress report

    I'm Camille, aka PouleyKetchoupp. I use Godot as an indie game developer (Nekomatata) and I've been a Godot contributor for a while (Github). Recently I was hired to work as a contractor on fixes and improvements for the Linux port of Godot 4. Most of the work was dedicated to fixing regressions due to the new Display Server used for window management, which allows support for multiple windows. I've also spent some extra time fixing old issues we had with X11 which required some refactoring in how the engine communicates with the X server. Some of them will be available in a later Godot 3.2 release as well. In this post I'm summarizing all the changes I've made in the X11 Display Server, in order to (hopefully) clarify how the X server works and how Godot communicates with it.

  • Godot Engine to get improved Linux support in the upcoming Godot 4 release | GamingOnLinux

    While the free and open source game engine Godot Engine already has Linux support, for both exported games and the full editor, it's set to get even better in Godot 4.0. In a blog post written by Camille Mohr-Daurat, they mentioned how they've been hired by the Godot team to work as a contractor on fixes and improvements for the Linux port of Godot. Camille Mohr-Daurat is an indie developer who actually uses Godot too at Nekomatata, where they created the unique ping-pong battler Punch Pong. So this is a real fun example of open source in action. Godot 4.0 will be coming with a new windowing system, so that you can separate parts of the Godot Engine editor from the main window. A lot of their work is focused on ensuring that works great on Linux with X11, which seems like there's a lot of work involved, because there's places where X11 doesn't have APIs to handle things where it does on other platforms like Windows and macOS - with drag and drop between windows being one mentioned example they've had to solve directly.

  • Lutris game launcher has a huge new Beta update out for testing | GamingOnLinux

    Lutris is the impressive all-in-one solution for managing games on Linux, bundling tons of sources of Linux releases from different stores under one roof as well as emulators, compatibility layers and more. Just recently on October 19 they put up the Beta of the new 0.5.8 release, and it includes some pretty huge changes and improvements all across the application. The way it actually works under the hood has been completely changed in many ways, along with the way you add games to it. Instead of manually importing games, it now attempts to sync up with your library across other stores like GOG, Humble and Steam. Adding games from the Lutris website using their scripts to set things up is also now in its own section, just called Lutris and it no longer depends on having install scripts for 3rd party services as Lutris will now run stuff with an "auto-generated" script but scripts on the Lutris database will take precedence if available

  • XCOM-ish combat and HOMM-styled world exploration Fort Triumph has a major update and sale | GamingOnLinux

    Possibly one of my favourite strategy game releases of 2020, Fort Triumph blends together XCOM styled combat with HOMM (Heroes of Might and Magic) exploration into quite a gem that doesn't take itself too seriously. What makes it fun is the environment interactions during battles, as you push rocks and drop trees onto enemies - it never gets old. It appears the team at CookieByte Entertainment have been busy too, with a huge free first post-release content upgrade out now. They've added in 27 new locations/events to the world map, and with some of these encounters you can add/remove traits from your heroes. Some of these encounters mix up the combat too, with some being unique Physics-only battles where you can only move around parts of the environment and not use normal abilities which sounds pretty hilarious.

  • KeeperRL, the open source dungeon building sim is getting a price bump in November | GamingOnLinux

    Fancy becoming a dungeon master? Well, if you're watching the pennies you might want to go and pick up KeeperRL before they price gets bumped up. This excellent open source building sim that mixes in RPG and roguelike elements has a lot to like about it, and it's been continually improved over 7 years now. Since it's had a lot added to it, and the developer has been working almost full time on it, they're going to be increasing the price from $14.99 to $20 on November 15. Plenty of notice if you were thinking about picking it up. Keep in mind they also said there will be no discounts planned until the big 1.0 release, so it's not going to be cheaper again any time soon.

  • Ampersat is an upcoming hack and slash shooter where everyone is ASCII | GamingOnLinux

    Mixing together ASCII characters and enemies, along with a full colour world, the hack and slash shooter Ampersat seems like a rather unique blend. A little weird too, with styles that usually clash and don't make sense together. You're the "at sign", the ampersat, and enemies are also these flat characters yet the world is 3D and full of colour. It looks bizarre but it works. Solo developer Gaterooze, Ink mentioned it was inspired by elements of Gauntlet and Smash TV to Zelda and a dash of Angband that "distils some favourite childhood gaming experiences into a fresh, fun hybrid that sees you killing a lot of monsters, finding a lot of loot, freeing captured letters and growing from a world-weary warrior mage into a powerful smashing/blasting machine".

  • Free copy of Europa Universalis II on GOG, with a huge Paradox Interactive sale going on | GamingOnLinux

    Paradox Interactive are celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Europa Universalis series so they're giving away Europa Universalis II and putting a bunch of other games on sale. For the free game, simply head to GOG.com and find the big banner. It doesn't support Linux like Paradox's later games, since it's a proper classic from way back in 2001 but you can try your luck with the Wine compatibility layer if you really want it.

  • Try the demo for Pyramid Plunge, a lighthearted platformer with a really odd couple | GamingOnLinux

    Ah yes, dangerous ancient pyramids with traps and deadly creatures, why not let a totally unprepared couple explore it? That's what you're doing in Pyramid Plunge as you run, carry your partner, fart to get airtime are more. The result is actually quite hilarious, mixing together challenging random generation with a sprinkle of comedy from the two wildly different characters that have a bit of banter between them like a true couple would. You don't see many platformers come along like this, what joy.

  • Proton: The Native Port Killer?

    The thrill surrounding the announcement of Street Fighter V coming to Linux was real. It was a few years after SteamOS was announced. After years of silence, fans started to doubt that this was becoming a reality. It wasn’t until two years after the initial release of Proton that Valve started to work with Capcom to try and make the Windows version compatible with Linux. Some people are still salty that it took this long to get here, and even more upset that this isn’t a native port. On the other hand, fans like myself are pleased that Valve/Capcom held to their word, even though they may have compromised a bit by making it Proton-compatible. The same goes for Rocket League. End-users like myself naturally get upset when delays happen, even though we don’t understand what it’s like to be on the developer’s side. Several months came and went after the original announcement, and finally the Mac and Linux versions of the game went live on Steam. Fast forward a few years later, and Psyonix decides to drop the ball for said versions, leaving it up to Proton to pick up the slack on Linux and bootcamp for Mac OS. Don’t even get me started on the fact that they basically abandoned support on Steam altogether in favor of the Epic Crap Store.

today's howtos

System76 Thelio Mega is a quad-GPU Linux desktop powered by Ryzen Threadripper

System76 began its life as a Linux computer seller only. Essentially, the company would sell re-branded laptops with Ubuntu pre-installed. To provide a class-leading experience, however, System76 also provided top-notch customer service, helping Linux beginners get started with a little hand-holding when needed. This focus on service continues today, and it is largely responsible for the company's success and longevity. Seeking to better control its own destiny, the company branched out from only being a computer-seller and transformed into a maker too. It's handcrafted Thelio desktops are powerful works of art, comprised of wood, metal, and good ol' fashioned American elbow grease. Yes, these Thelio machines are made in the USA -- Colorado, specifically. System76 has even created its own operating system -- the Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS, which has been very well received by the Linux community. This Linux distro will work on most computers -- not just Sytem76 machines. If you want vanilla Ubuntu, don't worry -- the company continues to offer that OS as an option when buying one of its computers. Read more

Sailfish OS: Shared mobile devices

The need for device sharing has become increasingly important for our partners. And it’s easy to understand why: imagine a scenario where a mobile device is required for executing certain actions during a business process. Each workstation has a mobile device and when a work shift changes the previous shift logs out of it and the new shift logs in. In this case the mobile device is more of a shared resource than a personal device. One of the major new features that we’re excited to have included in the latest 3.4 Pallas-Yllästunturi release is the ability to have multiple users on the same device that can be switched between in this way. For regular everyday use of Sailfish OS this doesn’t have any impact, the device owner (the primary user) works just as it used to. However, release 3.4 will have a new ‘defaultuser’ (devices flashed prior to 3.4.0 keep ‘nemo’ user, but it’s only the name that’s different). The new ‘defaultuser’ name is mostly visible behind the scenes for application developers; end users can ignore this detail. Read more