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BSD

GCC 7.2 Release and LLVM Updates

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • GCC 7 Release Series

    The GNU project and the GCC developers are pleased to announce the release of GCC 7.2.

    This release is a bug-fix release, containing fixes for regressions in GCC 7.1 relative to previous releases of GCC.

  • GCC 7.2 Compiler Released

    Richard Biener of SUSE has just announced the release of the GNU Compiler Collection 7.2.

    GCC 7.2 is available this morning and is a point release to this year's GCC 7 stable release. This is the first point release since the GCC 7.1 release earlier this year, which was the first stable version of GCC 7.

  • More Sandy Bridge Scheduling Updates For LLVM

BSD: DragonFlyBSD and BSDCam

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Finalizes Its Ryzen Workaround

    Separate from the AMD Ryzen performance marginality problem affecting Linux users, BSD users have been working on a workaround for their kernels to address problems with how their user stacks are mapped.

    A link circulating earlier this month was this FreeBSD commit to work around a guard page issue. Issues (funky behavior) can occur if code is running at the top of the user memory address space, so the workaround is to increase the guard page size. Linux has already had a large guard page while the BSDs have not, but they are now being increased for Ryzen.

  • BSDCam 2017 Trip Report: Michael Lucas

     

    BSDCam attendance is invitation only, and the facilities can only handle fifty folks or so. You need to be actively working on FreeBSD to wrangle an invite. Developers attend from all over the world. Yet, there’s no agenda. Robert Watson is the chair, but he doesn’t decide on the conference topics. He goes around the room and asks everyone to introduce themselves, say what they’re working on, and declare what they want to discuss during the conference. The topics of interest are tallied. The most popular topics get assigned time slots and one of the two big rooms. Folks interested in less popular topics are invited to claim one of the small breakout rooms.

Initial ARMv8.3-A Support Added To LLVM and LLVM 5.0 RC2 Released

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Development
BSD
  • Initial ARMv8.3-A Support Added To LLVM

    Initial enablement of the ARMv8.3-A architecture changes are now in place for the LLVM compiler infrastructure.

    The ARMv8.3-A update to the ARMv8 architecture include features pertaining to pointer authentication, nested virtualization, advanced SIMD complex number support, improved JavaScript type conversion support, changes to the memory consistency model, and an ID mechanism support for larger system-visible caches.

  • [llvm-dev] [5.0.0 Release] Release Candidate 2 tagged
  • LLVM 5.0 RC2 Released

    The second release candidate has been tagged for the upcoming LLVM 5.0 release.

    Hans Wennborg wrote that there are still "a bunch of open release blockers", but many patches have been merged since 5.0 RC1 so he is hoping for some fresh testing.

GhostBSD 11.1 Alpha

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BSD
  • GhostBSD 11.1 Enters Alpha: FreeBSD 11.1 Paired With MATE, Xfce Desktops

    While TrueOS (formerly PC-BSD) is arguably the most well known desktop variant of FreeBSD, GhostBSD has been gaining ground as well as a FreeBSD-based desktop-friendly operating system. Today marks the availability of GhostBSD 11.1 Alpha.

  • GhostBSD 11.1 ALPHA1 is ready!

    This first alpha development release of GhostBSD 11.1 is ready for testing. All MATE and XFCE image is available with i386 and amd64 architectures. We hope to see a lot of people helping to test this next release.

BSD: openbsd and kcollect in DragonFly

Filed under
BSD
  • openbsd changes of note 626
  • kcollect description
  • New mechanism: kcollect

    There’s a new facility in DragonFly: kcollect(8). It holds automatically-collected kernel data for about the last day, and can output to gnuplot. Note the automatic collection part; your system will always be able to tell you about weirdness – assuming that weirdness extends to one of the features kcollect tracks.

BSD: Contributing to FreeBSD and Release of DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1

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BSD
  • Contributing to FreeBSD

     

    The FreeBSD Testing Project is building an automated test suite for the entire operating system. They have a whole mess of work to do. There’s only four people on the team, so each additional person that contributes can have a serious impact. They have tutorials on how to write tests, and sample tests.

  • DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1 Released, Updates Intel DRM Against Linux 4.7.10

    DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1 has been released by Justin Sherrill with various minor updates -- particularly for Intel DRM graphics and other kernel improvements -- over the recent v4.8 milestone.

BSD: OPNsense 17.7, OpenBSD and LLVM

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BSD

OPNsense 17.7 released

Filed under
BSD

For more than two and a half years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

We are writing to you today to announce the final release of version 17.7 “Free Fox”, which, over the course of the last 6 months, includes highlights such as SafeStack application hardening, the Realtek re(4) driver for better network stability, a Quagga plugin with broad routing protocol support and the Unbound resolver as the new default. Additionally, translations for Czech, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and German have been completed for the first time during this development cycle.

Read more

BSD/UNIX: Trying OpenIndiana Hipster On The Core i9 7900X and 'End' of Bitrig

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BSD
  • Trying OpenIndiana Hipster On The Core i9 7900X

    Following the Linux and BSD multi-threaded tests on the Intel Core i9 7900X, I next decided to try this system with the Solaris-based OpenIndiana. Sadly, it didn't end well.

    With various BSDs working fine on the Core i9 7900X box paired with the NVMe storage, MSI X299 SLI PLUS motherboard, etc, I figured OpenIndiana would play fine. Sadly, I was wrong.

  • Bitrig: The Short-Lived OpenBSD Fork

    Bitrig, the operating system that forked OpenBSD back in 2012, is no longer being developed.

    Bitrig saw its initial release in 2014 but it's been relatively quiet since. In fact, pretty much forgotten on my end until seeing an LLVM commit this week mentioning Bitrig is dead and has been merged back into OpenBSD.

    Further showing the project is no more is the GitHub project area showing no more work since 2016.

BSD: TrueOS and OpenBSD mandoc

Filed under
BSD
  • Milestone Complete! OpenRC conversion

    The OpenRC conversion project is done! Over one thousand script/port conversions are complete, and all will be available in the TrueOS UNSTABLE and STABLE tracks soon. The project wants to extend a huge thank you to all those who contributed to completing this milestone, and a special thank you to contributors ZackaryWelch and elarge011 for doing the lion’s share of the work.

  • TrueOS Finishes Porting Scripts To OpenRC

    The TrueOS BSD distribution has finished porting over more than one thousand FreeBSD RC scripts into OpenRC format for this dependency-based init system.

    This year the TrueOS crew has been working on migrating to the OpenRC init system for better boot performance, easier configuration, better organization of configuration files, more reliable service status, etc. Popular services had been in OpenRC form already but now they have finished porting over more than 1,000 other scripts for OpenRC on TrueOS.

  • mandoc-1.14.2 released

     

    With the improved mandoc features, only twenty-five out of the ten thousand software packages in the OpenBSD ports tree still need groff to format their manual pages.

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GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday
    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.
  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today
    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer! Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!
  • Happy birthday, GNOME!
    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!
  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday
    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.