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BSD

BSD: OpenBSD Journal on Open Wi-Fi and 2TB of RAM

Filed under
BSD

OPNsense 19.1-RC1 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

For almost four years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

We thank all of you for helping test, shape and contribute to the project! We know it would not be the same without you.

Download links, an installation guide[1] and the checksums for the images can be found below as well.

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Also: OPNsense 19.1-RC1 Released With Many Improvements To This BSD Firewall Platform

Graphics: Vega, Radeon, Wayland on BSD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD
  • Vega 10 & Newer Getting More Fine-Grained PowerPlay Controls On Linux

    With the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel cycle, discrete Radeon graphics cards based on Vega 10 and newer will have fine-grained controls over what PowerPlay power management features are enabled and the ability to toggle them at run-time.

    Queued into the work-in-progress AMDGPU code for the eventual Linux 5.1 kernel cycle is now a ppfeatures for sysfs. This new "ppfeatures" file on sysfs will allow for querying the PowerPlay features state and toggling them individually. This includes features like GFXOFF (the ability to turn off the graphics engine when idling), automatic fan control, LED display for GPU activity, the dynamic power management state for the various blocks, and other features. Up to now the PowerPlay features couldn't be toggled individually but just a blanket enable/disable.

  • AMD Radeon 7 Will Have Day One Linux Support

    Linux gamers shouldn't see a repeat performance of the Radeon RX 590 situation.

  • Wayland Support On The BSDs Continuing To Improve

    While Wayland was designed on and for Linux systems, the BSD support for Wayland and the various compositors has continued improving particularly over the past year or so but it's still a lengthy journey.

    In a little more than one year, the FreeBSD Wayland support has been on a steady rise. It's looking like this year could even mark the KDE Wayland session for FreeBSD potentially getting squared away. Besides KDE, the GNOME Wayland work for FreeBSD has advanced a bit and is available in some FreeBSD Ports but there has been some complications around libinput and its Linux'isms. Details on the current state of Wayland-related components in FreeBSD is drafted at the FreeBSD Wiki.

New Releases: Kodachi 5.8, Tails RC, HardenedBSD Stable, KookBook 0.2.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Kodachi 5.8 The Secure OS

    Linux Kodachi operating system is based on Debian 9.5 / Ubuntu 18.04 it will provide you with a secure, anti-forensic, and anonymous operating system considering all features that a person who is concerned about privacy would need to have in order to be secure.
    Kodachi is very easy to use all you have to do is boot it up on your PC via USB drive then you should have a fully running operating system with established VPN connection + Connection established + service running. No setup or knowledge is required from your side we do it all for you. The entire OS is functional from your temporary memory RAM so once you shut it down no trace is left behind all your activities are wiped out.
    Kodachi is a live operating system that you can start on almost any computer from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card. It aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity, and helps you to:

  • Call for testing: [Tails] 3.12~rc1

    You can help Tails! The first release candidate for the upcoming version 3.12 is out. We are very excited and cannot wait to hear what you think about it, especially the new simplified USB installation method (see below). Smile

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 12-STABLE v1200058.2
  • KookBook 0.2.0 available – now manage your cooking recipes better

    Some people have started talking about maybe translation of the interface. I might look into that in the future.

    And I wouldn’t be sad if some icon artists provided me with a icon slightly better than the knife I drew. Feel free to contact me if that’s the case.

    Happy kooking!

New Release of HardenedBSD, New Show About BSDs and mintCast

Filed under
BSD

BSD: Trident 18.12 and LLVM/Clang Development

Filed under
BSD
  • Trident 18.12-RELEASE Available

    This version is based off the 18.12-stable branch of TrueOS (FreeBSD 13-CURRENT), using the new TrueOS distribution framework with several add-ons by Project Trident itself. The packages with this release were created from the TrueOS ports tree as-of January 7th. We are planning to release regular updates to packages every week or two depending on the state of the ports tree at any given time. In this release, both the Chromium and Iridium browsers have also been fixed and function normally again.

    18.12-RELEASE has been a long time in development, and we wish to say a bit “Thank You!” to everybody who has been helping test out the pre-release versions, find issues, submit fixes both to us and to upstream FreeBSD/TrueOS, and in general being a wonderful and supportive community! We look forward to continuing to work with all of you in making Project Trident amazing!

  • Google Is Hiring More LLVM/Clang Developers

    Android and Chrome are among their software now shipping in production that relies upon LLVM Clang rather than GCC or other alternatives, among other Google software projects. LLVM/Clang is also used by various internal projects at Google. Over the years Google developers have contributed back many improvements to upstream LLVM ranging from their Lanai processor back-end to security improvements to other language tooling on LLVM to performance optimizations.

  • LLVM 9.0 Is Now Open For Development, Releasing In Late 2019

    The code for the upcoming LLVM 8.0 release (Clang 8.0 included) is now branched and the release candidate process will begin shortly. That means LLVM 9.0 is now open for development on its master branch.

    Developers behind this compiler stack are planning to get out of the official LLVM 8.0.0 release by the end of February. The first release candidate is imminent and one or two more can be expected in February based upon how the testing proceeds.

ZOL 0.8 Nears With RC3 Release - Big Update For ZFS On Linux

Filed under
Linux
BSD

ZFS On Linux (ZOL) 0.8 is going to be a big release... No, a huge release. But for ensuring it's going to be a successful release, a third release candidate was just issued for further vetting of all the new code.

ZFS On Linux 0.8 is bringing a lot of new features including native encryption support, device removal, direct I/O, sequential scrub, pool checkpoints, and a lot of other new features for the first time with this Linux port of the Sun/Oracle ZFS file-system.

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Linux vs BSD: Is BSD better than Linux?

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Linux
BSD

Well, the world of operating systems isn’t that tiny. There is yet another class of operating system, which most users don’t know about, or haven’t used it ever in their life. It is BSD. BSDs are yet another class of operating system which is also popular among some individual users, or some organizations with some unified goal. If we keep the scene of Windows out of the picture, for now, most users might consider BSD and Linux to be quite similar, with some small differences, or do not have any conception about BSD altogether. And if you are on the verge of installing a new operating system on your computer, which is going to be better for you!

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DragonFlyBSD Continues Gutting Its i386 Code

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BSD

The DragonFlyBSD operating system dropped its i386 install support back in 2014 with DragonFlyBSD 4.0 and since then has been focused on x86_64-only. Over the past two years or so they have gutted much of their i386-specific code from their kernel that is no longer needed for today's modern processors while over the weekend they got back to doing some more of that cleansing.

Rounds 69 and 70 were merged this weekend on weeding out the i386 code that is no longer needed within their kernel.

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BSD: New Console Font Spleen and 2018 Recap

Filed under
BSD
  • New console font Spleen made default

    This new font brings more easily readable text to the higher resolution screens that are commonly seen on newer machines, while still filling the complete screen with a reasonable number of characters. If you like the Spleen font, you can use it in your xterminals by installing the fonts/spleen port with doas pkg_add spleen. More details can be found on Frederic's website. Those who prefer the old (or other) fonts while in console mode are invited to read the wsconsctl(8) manpage.

  • 2018 Recap

    Unfortunately I didn’t spend as much time as I wanted doing stuff for FreeBSD, but it also wasn’t tragic. I did some commits which meant I placed 28th out of 218 active FreeBSD commiters this year. This year I also did my 200th commit!

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Windows Server Benchmarked Against Six Linux Distributions

While it was not too long ago that Microsoft Windows Server 2019 began shipping and that we conducted some end-of-year benchmarks between Windows and Linux, with being in the process of running a number of Windows and Linux benchmarks as part of our ongoing 10GbE OS performance testing, I also took the opportunity to run some other benchmarks on Windows Server 2016 and 2019 as well as a set of Linux distributions. With carrying out the fresh OS installations anyways for the network testing, with recently having brought over some more Phoronix Test Suite test profiles with Windows support, I decided to run some fresh Windows Server vs. Linux benchmarks anyways. Granted, not all of the tests are server-oriented and not all of the traditional Linux server distributions were used. Just take this as you wish of some fresh Windows vs. Linux performance benchmarks. Read more

Games: Lutris, Little Mouse's Encyclopedia, Team Fortress 2 and More

Roundup of Wine 4.0 Release Coverage

  • Wine 4.0 Released
    The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 4.0 is now available.
  • Wine 4.0 Officially Released with Vulkan & Direct3D 12 Support, HiDPI on Android
    The Wine project proudly announced today the general availability of the Wine 4.0 release, a major version of the open-source software that lets Linux and macOS users install and use Windows apps on their computers. Wine 4.0 comes about a year after the Wine 3.0 release, which was the first to introduce an Android driver to allow users run Windows apps and games on devices powered by Google's Android mobile OS, Direct3D 11 support by default for AMD Radeon and Intel GPUs, a task scheduler, as well as AES encryption support on macOS. With Wine 4.0, the team continues to improve the free and open-source compatibility layer that allows Windows program to run on Linux and Mac computers, adding new features like support for the next-generation Vulkan graphics API, Direct3D 12 support, HiDPI (High-DPI) support on Android, and support for game controllers.
  • Wine 4.0 Released With New Features: Run Windows Apps On Linux Efficiently
    With Microsoft’s initiative to bring Linux Bash Shell on Windows 10, the Windows users are now able to run their favorite Linux tools on their current operating system. But what if you need to run full-fledged Windows apps and games on a Linux distro? In that case, a software like Wine is really helpful. The developers of this utility have recently released the new version, i.e., 4.0, with lots of features. Wine 4.0 is the result of a year of development effort.
  • Wine 4.0 Released With Vulkan Support, Initial Direct3D 12 Support, CSMT Enabled By Default
    After being in development for a year, Wine 4.0 is now available for download. The new stable Wine release includes important changes like support for Vulkan, Direct3D 12 and game controllers. For those that might not be familiar with it, Wine is a Windows compatibility layer for Linux that lets you run Windows applications and games on Linux, macOS, and Android (experimental). Wine is used by Proton, Valve's Steam Play compatibility layer that allows playing Windows games on Linux, and by CrossOver, a commercial Microsoft Windows compatibility layer for macOS and Linux, among others.
  • Wine 4.0 is Here with Significant New Features
    Not everyone prefers to use Wine. But, if you have a favorite app/service that is not yet available for Linux, you can try Wine in order to run Windows apps or games. For those who are not aware of Wine, it’s a software that lets you run Windows-only applications and games on Linux. Want iTune on Linux, Wine is your best bet.
  • Wine 4.0 Released With Vulkan Support, Initial Direct3D 12 and Better HiDPI
  • Wine 4.0 Officially Released With Vulkan Support, Initial Direct3D 12 & Better HiDPI
    Wine 4.0 is now officially available as the new annual stable release to Wine for running Windows programs and games on Linux and other operating systems. Following seven weekly release candidates, Wine 4.0 was ready to ship today as judged by Wine founder Alexandre Julliard. Wine 4.0 is a big release bringing initial Vulkan graphics API support, Direct3D CSMT is enabled by default, early Direct3D 12 support via VKD3D, continued HiDPI work, various OpenGL improvements, multi-sample D3D texture support, 64-bit improvements, continued Android support, and much more... See our Wine 4.0 feature overview to learn more about this big update.
  • Just over a year after the last main release, Wine 4.0 is officially here
    You might want to grab a glass for this one, no not that dusty old thing, one of the nice ones. The ones at the back of the cupboard for special occasions! Wine 4.0 is officially here. Comparing Wine 3.0 to 4.0, naturally it's a pretty huge release. Although, most people have likely been using the development builds for some time.

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