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BSD

GhostBSD 10.3 RC1 Is Out, but ZFS Disk Encryption Was Pushed Back to GhostBSD 11

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BSD

The GhostBSD developers are announcing on August 10, 2016, the general availability of the first RC (Release Candidate) development milestone towards the upcoming GhostBSD 10.3 operating system.

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FreeBSD and UbuntuBSD

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BSD
Ubuntu

BSD Leftovers

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BSD
  • The Importance of Bell Labs Unix

    Unix was first developed by Ken Thompson in the summer of 1969 on the DEC PDP-7 minicomputer. By 1979 Unix version 7 was making the rounds at universities all over the world. Bell Labs Unix has enormous importance: It was the basis for many operating systems that followed including BSD, and the template for Minix and Linux.

  • Lumina Desktop 1.0.0 released
  • Version 1.0.0 Released

    After roughly four years of development, I am pleased to announce the first official release of the Lumina desktop environment! This release is an incredible realization of the initial idea of Lumina – a simple and unobtrusive desktop environment meant for users to configure to match their individual needs. I hope you all enjoy it, and I look forward to working with all of you on the next iterations of this desktop!

  • Lumina Desktop 1.0 Released

Steam and KDE on FreeBSD

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KDE
BSD
Gaming
  • Script Makes It Easy To Deploy Steam On FreeBSD

    With a new script, it's possible to get Valve's Steam Linux game client running relatively well on FreeBSD.

    On FreeBSD in conjunction with its Linux binary compatibility layer it's possible to run Steam for handling your favorite Steam Linux titles. If you are unfamiliar with FreeBSD's Linux compatibility layer, see FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux?. That article has background information along with some Linux vs. FreeBSD gaming benchmarks I did five years ago... When FreeBSD 11.0 is out, I'll try again to get it working to see how FreeBSD 11 performs for running Linux native games.

  • Time flies for FBSD updates, too

    The older KDE stuff — that is, KDE4, which is still the current official release for the desktop on FreeBSD — is also maintained, although (obviously) not much changes there. We did run into a neat C++-exceptions bug recently, which was kind of hard to trigger: running k3b (or ksoundconverter and some other similar ones) with a CD that is unknown to MusicBrainz would crash k3b. There’s not that many commercially-available CDs unknown to that database, so I initially brushed off the bug report as Works For Me.

DragonFlyBSD 4.6 vs. Linux Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

With DragonFlyBSD 4.6 having been released this week, here are benchmarks comparing its performance to that of the previous DragonFlyBSD 4.4 release as well as seeing how it compares to some Linux distributions.

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DragonFly 4.6

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BSD
  • DragonFly 4.6 released

    DragonFly version 4.6 brings brings more updates to accelerated video for both i915 and radeon users, home-grown support for NVMe controllers, preliminary EFI support, improvements in SMP and networking performance under heavy load, and a full range of binary packages.

  • DragonFly BSD 4.6.0 Launches with Home-Grown Support for NVMe Controllers

    Today, August 2, 2016, the development team behind the BSD kernel-based DragonFly BSD operating system proudly announced the official availability of the DragonFly BSD 4.6.0 update.

    DragonFly BSD 4.6.0 appears to be a major release that ends the development of the 4.4 series of the acclaimed BSD distribution and promises to introduce lots of goodies to users of this computer OS. Prominent features include initial UEFI support, in-house built support for NVMe SSD devices, as well as SMP and networking improvements.

  • DragonFlyBSD 4.6 Rolls Out NVMe Support, Better SMP Performance

OpenSSH 7.3 Released

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Software
BSD
  • OpenSSH 7.3 Released, Adds ProxyJump & IdentityAgent Options

    OpenSSH 7.3 was released today by the OpenBSD camp with some security fixes while also providing a few new options and other features.

  • OpenSSH 7.3 released

    OpenSSH is a 100% complete SSH protocol 2.0 implementation and includes sftp client and server support. OpenSSH also includes transitional support for the legacy SSH 1.3 and 1.5 protocols that may be enabled at compile-time.

  • OpenSSH 7.3

    OpenSSH 7.3 has just been released. It will be available from the mirrors listed at http://www.openssh.com/ shortly.

FreeBSD 11.0 Beta 3

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.0-BETA3 Now Available
  • FreeBSD 11.0 Beta 3 Out Now, Final Release Is Expected to Land on September 2

    FreeBSD Project's Glen Barber announced the availability of the third Beta milestone towards the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system for public beta testing.

    Delayed one day, the FreeBSD 11.0 Beta 3 release is the last one for this development cycle, and it promises to squash even more of those annoying issues that have been reported by users since the first and second Beta milestones. Among the changes, we can mention improvements to the libunwind library, and updated locales.

  • Myths about FreeBSD [Ed: last edited this weekend.]

OPNsense 16.7

Filed under
Security
BSD
  • OPNsense 16.7 released
  • pfSense/m0n0wall-Forked OPNsense 16.7 Released

    The latest major release is out of OPNsense, a BSD open-source firewall OS project derived from pfSense and m0n0wall.

    OPNsense 16.7 brings NetFlow-based reporting and export, trafic shaping support, two-factor authentication, HTTPS and ICAP support in the proxy server, and UEFI boot and installation modes.

BSD Leftovers

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BSD
  • FreeBSD Q2'2016: EFI Improvements, Prepping For FreeBSD 11.0, Package Updates

    For FreeBSD fans not closely following its development on a daily basis, the FreeBSD project has released their Q2'2016 quarterly status report that covers various activities going on around this BSD operating system project.

  • EuroBSDCon 2016 schedule has been released

    The EuroBSDCon 2016 talks and schedule have been released, and oh are we in for a treat!

    All three major BSD's have a "how we made the network go fast" talk, nearly every single timeslot has a networking related talk, and most of the non-networking talks look fantastic as well.

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Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

SUSE at LuLu and History

  • LuLu Group migrates to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
    LuLu Group has selected SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications to help business managers faster identify and respond to new opportunities and competitive threats. Headquartered in the United Arab Emirates, the international retailer runs 124 outlets and operates in 31 countries. It welcomes more than 700,000 shoppers daily. Since starting its retail journey in the early 1990s, LuLu Group expanded its business aggressively and required advanced technology to optimise its business. Hence, it migrated from Solaris UNIX to SUSE Linux as platform for SAP solutions, reducing SAP landscape operating costs at least 20 percent.
  • SUSE's Role in the History of Linux and Open Source
    What role did SUSE play in the growth of Linux and the open source ecosystem? How did SUSE and other Linux-based operating systems evolve into the enterprise platforms they are today? Here's what SUSE employees had to say about Linux history in a recent interview. To help mark the anniversary of Linus Torvalds's release of Linux twenty-five years ago, I interviewed Meiki Chabowski, SUSE Documentation, and Markus Feilner, Strategist & Documentation Team Lead. Their answers, printed below, provide interesting perspective not only on the history of SUSE, but also of Linux and open source as a whole.

Cost Effective Linux Server Software for Enterprises

The advantages of a Linux server over expensive Windows systems are numerous with hardly any drawbacks. Since Linux is not dominant as Windows, there are some slight difficulties to find applications based on this platform to support the needs. While security stands as an important aspect for servers, the advantage over dominant operating systems is that security flaws are caught in Linux, even before they become an issue for the public. Linux was one of the first open-source technologies in which you can download the source code and change it any way you like. Several Linux coders have developed software that’s completely open-source for any user, improving the security and usability at each core. Read more Also: Weigh the pros, cons of three Linux load balancer options