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BSD

OpenBSD and FreeBSD Updates

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD -stable binary packages

    The OpenBSD base system has received binary updates for security and some other important problems in the base OS through syspatch(8) for the last few releases.

    We are pleased to announce that we now also provide selected binary packages for the most recent release. These are built from the -stable ports tree which receives security and a few other important fixes: [...]

  • FreeBSD Around the World

    One of our major goals this year is to increase FreeBSD awareness around the world. I’m excited about upcoming events, like the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit, where we are giving a talk on FreeBSD. But first, I wanted to highlight some of the events we’ve attended over the past few months. I have been pretty bad about writing event reports, so I’m summarizing some of them here. It’s a good thing our Marketing Director isn’t local, otherwise she would be camping in our office forcing me to write the reports.

Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 12-STABLE v1200059.3

Filed under
Security
BSD

HardenedBSD-12-STABLE-v1200059.3

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Instant Workstation

Filed under
KDE
BSD

Some considerable time ago I wrote up instructions on how to set up a FreeBSD machine with the latest KDE Plasma Desktop. Those instructions, while fairly short (set up X, install the KDE meta-port, .. and that’s it) are a bit fiddly.

So – prompted slightly by a Twitter exchange recently – I’ve started a mini-sub-project to script the installation of a desktop environment and the bits needed to support it. To give it at least a modicum of UI, dialog(1) is used to ask for an environment to install and a display manager.

The tricky bits – pointed out to me after I started – are hardware support, although a best-effort is better than having nothing, I think.

In any case, in a VBox host it’s now down to running a single script and picking Plasma and SDDM to get a usable system for me. Other combinations have not been tested, nor has system-hardware-setup. I’ll probably maintain it for a while and if I have time and energy it’ll be tried with nVidia (those work quite well on FreeBSD) and AMD (not so much, in my experience) graphics cards when I shuffle some machines around.

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DragonFly 5.6.2 released

Filed under
BSD

Because of the recent tcp keepalive change and some other updates, DragonFly 5.6 has been updated to 5.6.2. See my release email, and update the normal way. You will need to update your installed dports.

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Also: DragonFlyBSD 5.6.2 Released With Disruptive Change To Help Chromium, Ported Apps

DragonFly 5.6.2 tagged

Filed under
BSD

I tagged 5.6.2 and built it this morning:

http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-August/719259.html

It includes the recent tcp keepalive changes and some other work.
You'll want to update dports, too.

I'm uploading the 5.6.2 image as I type. You can rebuild using the
normal process on an existing 5.6.0 or 5.6.1 system:

> cd /usr/src
> git pull
> make buildworld
> make buildkernel
> make installkernel
> make installworld
> make upgrade

and of course

> pkg upgrade

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Porting wine to amd64 on NetBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Porting wine to amd64 on NetBSD, second evaluation report

    As getting Wine to work with WoW64 support was of foremost importance, my focus was on compat32 dependency packages without which Wine's functionality would be limited and more importantly untestable. Initially, being unaware of what to expect, I just wanted Wine to run, at the earliest. So, with outmost support from mentors, the consensus was to install libs from 32-bit packages to ${PREFIX}/lib/32 and ignore everything else that came with the respective packages.

    I had most of the compat32 packages ready after a couple of days. And it was time we gave Wine a whirl. Well, the build was successful. However, I had problems with 32-bit Xorg. The applications which came packaged with Wine worked fine, but, other Microsoft Windows applications like notepad++, Mario etc had a hard time running. Additionally, I noticed that fontconfig went wild and crashed spewing errors symptomatic of Wine (32-bit) not playing nice with the fontconfig lib that came with 32-bit Xorg package. On top of this, I found that build failed on certain machines due to unavailability of headers. This made us reconsider our decision to install 32-bit libs to ${PREFIX}/lib/32 and ignore everything else which included headers and binaries.

  • Wine On 64-bit NetBSD Is Now In Much Better Shape Thanks To GSoC

    One of the many interesting Google Summer of Code (GSoC) projects this year has been to improve the Wine support on NetBSD. Thanks to student developer Naveen Narayanan, that is becoming a reality.

NetBSD 9.0 release process has started

Filed under
BSD

If you have been following source-changes, you may have noticed the creation of the netbsd-9 branch!

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Also: NetBSD 9.0 Prepping For Release With AArch64 Support, Kernel ASLR & Better NVMe Perf

BSD: OpenBSD for Security, DragonFlyBSD's New Server

Filed under
BSD
  • Need a Secure Operating System? Take a Look at OpenBSD

    The Unix-like OS offers support for a wide range of hardware platforms, third-party tools and an active, supportive community.

  • DragonFlyBSD Replacing Their 48-Core Opteron Infrastructure With Ryzen 9 3900X CPUs

    DragonFlyBSD is replacing their 48-core Opteron server named "Monster" with two of the new AMD Ryzen 9 3900X "Zen 2" processors as well as a spare Xeon server. DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon continues to be mighty impressed by AMD's latest processor offerings.

    Last year Matthew Dillon professed his love for the performance of AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs while in recent weeks he's been quick to get Ryzen 3000 CPUs working on DragonFlyBSD and has been impressed by their performance.

FreeBSD 12 Runs Refreshingly Easy On AMD Ryzen 9 3900X - Benchmarks Against Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD
Ubuntu

While newer Linux distributions have run into problems on the new AMD Zen 2 desktop CPUs (fixed by a systemd patch or fundamentally by a BIOS update) and DragonFlyBSD needed a separate boot fix, FreeBSD 12.0 installed out-of-the-box fine on the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X test system with ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO WiFi motherboard.

[...]

I also attempted to try DragonFlyBSD with its latest daily ISO/IMG following the Zen 2 fix this week by Matthew Dillon. Unfortunately, even with the latest daily ISO I ran into a panic at boot time. So as a result, today are just some FreeBSD 12.0 vs. Ubuntu 18.04 benchmarks for reference. Matthew Dillon did have some interesting comments in our forums about his (great) experiences with these new CPUs, some limitations, and about the original DragonFlyBSD issue.

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Project Trident 19.07 Available

Filed under
BSD

This is a packages update with some important bugfixes from upstream TrueOS.

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