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BSD

NVMM Ported To DragonFlyBSD For Virtualization

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BSD

DragonFlyBSD has integrated the NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor (NVMM) hypervisor that can be used with QEMU.

As of yesterday the initial NVMM port has landed within the DragonFlyBSD source tree for supporting NVMM for virtualization on this operating system long ago forked from FreeBSD. NVMM currently supports making use of AMD SVM and Intel VT/VMX for hardware accelerated virtualization.

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Security Patches, FreeBSD, and Lubuntu 20.10 End of Life

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Security
BSD
Ubuntu
  • Security updates for Saturday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (gitlab, nodejs, openexr, php, php7, rabbitmq, ruby-addressable, and spice), Fedora (suricata), Gentoo (binutils, docker, runc, and tor), Mageia (avahi, botan2, connman, gstreamer1.0-plugins, htmldoc, jhead, libcroco, libebml, libosinfo, openexr, php, php-smarty, pjproject, and python), openSUSE (apache2, bind, bouncycastle, ceph, containerd, docker, runc, cryptctl, curl, dovecot23, firefox, graphviz, gstreamer-plugins-bad, java-1_8_0-openj9, java-1_8_0-openjdk, libass, libjpeg-turbo, libopenmpt, libqt5-qtwebengine, libu2f-host, libwebp, libX11, lua53, lz4, nginx, ovmf, postgresql10, postgresql12, python-urllib3, qemu, roundcubemail, solo, thunderbird, ucode-intel, wireshark, and xterm), and SUSE (permissions).

  • Fixing vulns in poudriere jails

    When a FreeBSD security alert comes out, or a package is marked as vulnerable, I try to get that fixed as soon as I can. Even if not using the feature. Sometimes a vuln can be leverages against something you are using. Patch it.

    When it comes to my poudriere jails, I don’t.

  • Lubuntu 20.10 End of Life and Current Support Statuses

    Lubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) was released October 22, 2020 and will reach End of Life on Thursday, July 22, 2021. This means that after that date there will be no further security updates or bugfixes released. We highly recommend that you update to 21.04 as soon as possible if you are still running 20.10.

    After July 22nd, the only supported releases of Lubuntu will be 20.04 (until April 2023) and 21.04 (until January 2022). All other releases of Lubuntu will be considered unsupported, and will no longer receive any further updates from the Lubuntu team.

FreeBSD KDE Frameworks dependencies

Filed under
KDE
BSD

Packaging software is a colossal waste of time. Take that however you will; I’ll write about some time-wasting I’ve undertaken this week to reduce time-wasting by others (mostly users of KDE Frameworks on FreeBSD) in future.

Almost all KDE software uses CMake; in CMakeLists.txt in the source of each package / product the direct dependencies are known and expressed through find_package(). In the kdesrc-build configuration files and metadata there is dependency data, and yet each packaging system has to go out and re-discover and re-write the dependency information one more time (for good luck).

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pfSense CE 2.5.2 Released, With Some Challenges For Early WireGuard Adopters

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Security
BSD

pfSense Community Edition is the open source branch freely available for use, as opposed to pfSense Pro which is the new closed source branch. pfSense CE 2.5.2 has just been released for you packet junkies out there, but as ServeTheHome discovered it may not be a simple upgrade for some. After the release of pfSense 2.5, pfSense and FreeBSD pulled back on kernel WireGuard support which many had been using in conjunction with pfSense. This means that a number of users out there are running a router with an outdated version of Wireguard and that will prevent a happy upgrade to 2.5.2, which returns Wireguard support as an experimental add-in.

Upon installing the update, those few brave souls running Wireguard will be faced with error messages stating that all Wireguard interfaces and tunnels must be removed before the installation can succeed. This is inconvenient but as the number of users that will see the message is quite low the decision makes some sense. In order to upgrade the existing version of Wireguard, pfSense would have to put a fair amount of work into testing and development for this patch. This could change thanks to the open source nature of pfSense CE, but ServeTheHome is not holding much hope for that at the moment.

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Following NetBSD, DragonFlyBSD Now Has "COVID"

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BSD
Sci/Tech

There is now covid going around the BSDs... DragonFlyBSD has ported it from NetBSD.

Yes, COVID as in COVID-19 / SARS-CoV-2 but this is actually an open-source package containing the SARS-CoV-2 genome and a manual (man page) encouraging vaccination and other steps to help prevent the spread of COVID.

DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon ported the covid utility from NetBSD. Following that commit this weekend was a follow-up patch for this covid utility now living in DragonFlyBSD world.

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BSD and GNU/Linux Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

  • The Impending Doom of Your Operating System Going to or Past 11, Versus the Lush Oasis of Open Source Systems

    So now I have a gorgeous, lightweight 13.9 inch laptop running OpenBSD with Xorg running with a 3300x2200 pixel resolution and everything I care about working. With a little attention to proper testing, we have reason to believe that all of this will be properly supported without regression for older hardware versions in the upcoming OpenBSD 7.0 release.

    As I had hinted earlier, you may very well find yourself better served and supported by the open source operating system of your choice and its developers and users than you can reasonably expect from the commercial, proprietary options.

    If you have questions about anything in this article, OpenBSD or other free systems, please let me know in comments here, seek out a local-to-you user group (the ones I am most involved in are NUUG, the national Norwegian Unix User Group, and BLUG, the Bergen (BSD and) Linux User Group), or drop me an email. If you choose the last option, please read my read me first document before sending a second message.

  • A Smarter, Cost-efficient Way to Provision Cloud Workloads with ProphetStor Federator.ai

    SUSE One Partner, ProphetStor, now has an offering live in the SUSE Rancher Apps and Marketplace and we’ve invited ProphetStor to author a guest blog so you can learn more about their AI-based container workload performance and cost optimization platform. ~ Bret

  • NIST Successfully Tests BitRaser® Drive Eraser for Securely Wiping Hard Drives & SSDs

    The test hardware comprised an Intel Core i5-6402P desktop PC with a 2.80 GHz CPU and SATA interface. The desktop PC, running on Arch Linux, was connected with Toshiba® and Transcend® SATA hard drives to install two different configurations for testing the NIST Secure Erase capability of BitRaser Drive Eraser v3.0.

  • Intel Begins Bringing Up DG2 Graphics Card, Xe_HP SDV Support For Linux - Phoronix

    Following recent reports Intel has begun seeding the Xe-HPG DG2 graphics card to developers and various reported leaks around the next-gen "DG2" graphics card, Intel's open-source Linux driver engineers have begun publishing patches for enabling the DG2 as well as the Xe_HP SDV.

    This initial DG2 bring-up for Linux happens to come almost immediately following Intel getting DG1 discrete graphics acceleration working to the extent of now being able to run an accelerated desktop environment with the latest pending patches.

Audiocasts/Shows: L4E on Valve, BSDNow, and TLLTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

DragonFlyBSD To See Better Low-Level Lock Performance When Heavily Contested

Filed under
BSD

Software running on DragonFlyBSD and making use of pthreads is set to see better performance around low-level locks when heavily contested.

This commit has the details on the change by DragonFlyBSD founder Matthew Dillon. But long story short pthreads-using software should benefit from this low-level lock performance improvement.

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Audiocasts/Show: RasPad, Ubuntu Podcast, BSDNow

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • The RasPad 3 - Unboxing and Assembly (Full review tomorrow!!!)

    The RasPad 3 is a neat project that enables you to turn your Raspberry Pi 4 into a full tablet! In this video, I'll unbox the RasPad 3 and I'll also show you the entire assembly process. Be sure to check out my full review as well.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S14E15 – Tanks Crash Clash

    This week we’ve been learning Davinci Resolve and instrumenting our house with DHT11 sensors. We round up the goings on from the Ubuntu community and discuss our favourite picks from the wider tech news.

    It’s Season 14 Episode 15 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • BSDNow 407: The jail Detail

    Confining the omnipotent root, Jails with ZFS and PF on DigitalOcean, NomadBSD 130R is out, KDE Plasma Wayland on FreeBSD, Firefox under FreeBSD with Privacy, Using NetBSD’s pkgsrc everywhere, and more.

helloSystem - FreeBSD Based OS Brings another Promising Release 0.5.0

Filed under
BSD

The helloSystem team brings another promising release with its latest version 0.5.0. And gives hope to users as a free alternative to macOS.
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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi 4 2GB jumps to $45 as 1GB model returns from the dead at $35

Citing chip shortages, Raspberry Pi announced its first price increase, bumping the RPi 4 with 2GB RAM up to $45. Meanwhile, the discontinued RPi 4 1GB has come back to life at $35. In the spirit of Halloween, Raspberry Pi Trading has reanimated the 1GB RAM version of the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, which it killed off when it dropped the price of the 2GB model from $45 to $35 in Feb. 2020. The company also increased the 2GB price to $45. With the 1GB version returning at its old $35 price, we have essentially turned back the clock to early 2020. (In which case, maybe we could get a second chance on stopping the pandemic.) In the Raspberry Pi blog post announcing the changes, CEO Eben Upton cited industry-wide supply chain issues for its first price increase in Pi history. The chip shortages, combined with heightened demand, have caused severe shortages of the RPi Zero and the RPi4 2GB. Read more

The love/hate relationship the cloud has with Linux

The cloud is run by Linux and open-source. There is no debating that claim at this point. It's fact. And not only does Linux power all of those cloud services we deploy and use, but the hold it has over that particular tech sector is also only going to get stronger as we march into the future. I predict that, over the next five years, the cloud and Linux will become synonymous to the point everyone (from CEOs to end-users) will finally get just how important and powerful the platform is. So it's safe to say, there would be no cloud without Linux. There would also be no cloud-native development, Kubernetes, Docker, virtual machines or containers in general. With that in mind, it should stand to reason that the relationship between Linux and the cloud would be all love. Read more

You Can Now Install the UnityX Desktop in Arch Linux, Here's How

UnityX is the successor of the Unity7 desktop environment created by Canonical for its popular Ubuntu Linux distribution back in 2011 with the Ubuntu 11.04 release. But Canonical pulled the plug on Unity7 after seven years of development, yet the community wasn’t ready for this major change. In May 2020, developer Rudra Saraswat created an unofficial Ubuntu flavor called Ubuntu Unity, which features the good old Unity7 desktop environment. Now, the Ubuntu Unity creator wants to take Unity7 to the next level and created UnityX, a modern, yet simple desktop environment. Read more

PSA: gnome-settings-daemon's MediaKeys API is going away

In 2007, Jan Arne Petersen added a D-Bus API to what was still pretty much an import into gnome-control-center of the "acme" utility I wrote to have all the keys on my iBook working. It switched the code away from remapping keyboard keys to "XF86Audio*", to expecting players to contact the D-Bus daemon and ask to be forwarded key events. In 2013, we added support for controlling media players using MPRIS, as another interface. Fast-forward to 2021, and MPRIS support is ubiquitous, whether in free software, proprietary applications or even browsers. So we'll be parting with the "org.gnome.SettingsDaemon.MediaKeys" D-Bus API. If your application still wants to work with older versions of GNOME, it is recommended to at least quiet the MediaKeys API's unavailability. Read more