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NetBSD 8.0 Release Candidate 2

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BSD

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 8.0 RC 2, the second (and hopefully final) release candidate for the upcoming NetBSD 8.0 release.

Unfortunately the first release candidate did not hold up in our extensive testing (also know as eating our own dog food): many NetBSD.org servers/machines were updated to it and worked fine, but the auto build cluster, where we produce our binaries, did not work well. The issue was tracked down to a driver bug (Intel 10 GBit ethernet), only showing up in certain configurations, and it has been fixed now.

Other security events, like the new FPU related exploit on some Intel CPUs, caused further kernel changes, so we are not going to release NetBSD 8.0 directly, but instead provide this new release candidate for additional testing.

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Also: NetBSD 8.0 RC2 Released With Eager FPU Security Fix, Other Fixes

NetBSD Audio Improvements Are On The Way For Better Performance & Less Stuttering

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BSD

Being squared away for the NetBSD 8.1 release are audio improvements within the kernel.

The work being done by Nathanial Sloss eliminates some complexities in the existing code, stopping the copying of stream silence, caching of three blocks of audio, and more.

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Rewards of Up to $500,000 Offered for FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, Linux Zero-Days

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Security
BSD

Exploit broker Zerodium is offering rewards of up to $500,000 for zero-days in UNIX-based operating systems like OpenBSD, FreeBSD, NetBSD, but also for Linux distros such as Ubuntu, CentOS, Debian, and Tails.

The offer, first advertised via Twitter earlier this week, is available as part of the company's latest zero-day acquisition drive. Zerodium is known for buying zero-days and selling them to government agencies and law enforcement.

The company runs a regular zero-day acquisition program through its website, but it often holds special drives with more substantial rewards when it needs zero-days of a specific category.

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Is FreeBSD faster than Linux?

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Linux
BSD

FreeBSD is a free and open-source Unix-like OS that powers desktops, servers, and embedded platforms. Unlike Linux, which refers to the kernel combined with GNU to form GNU/Linux, the Operating System, FreeBSD is a complete OS with its own kernel and a focus on stability and speed, among other features.

It is not true that FreeBSD is used on only servers and there are a variety of valid reasons why users argue that it does a better job in general than Linux so you might just give it a try. Both are stable and provide an efficient working environment.

However, the general consensus is that nearly all applications run faster on Linux than FreeBSD, but FreeBSD’s TCP/IP stack has way less latency (faster response time) than Linux. This is reportedly the reason why Netflix streams its shows on FreeBSD and even pay some of its engineers to contribute to its kernel codebase.

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FreeBSD 11.2 and Workarounds

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.2 Ready For Release With Spectre Mitigation, Various Enhancements

    FreeBSD 11.2 is ready to set sail as the first significant FreeBSD update since last July's 11.1 release.

    FreeBSD 11.2-RELEASE is now available. Those wanting it right now can find it via FTP with the 11.2-RELEASE images being spun, assuming no last minute issues occur prior to the FreeBSD team officially announcing this release.

  • Workarounds To Get AMD Zen/Ryzen CPUs Running Solid On FreeBSD

    While the Linux support for AMD Ryzen/EPYC processors has been solid on Linux now largely the past number of months with just some exceptions like Raven Ridge display issues, the FreeBSD support has been a bit more choppy.

    The number of AMD Zen + FreeBSD issues has gone down in recent months when using the latest FreeBSD code, but some have still talked of stability issues that can creep up over time.

OpenBSD chief de Raadt says no easy fix for new Intel CPU bug

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Security
BSD

Recompiling is unlikely to be a catch-all solution for a recently unveiled Intel CPU vulnerability known as TLBleed, the details of which were leaked on Friday, the head of the OpenBSD project Theo de Raadt says.

The details of TLBleed, which gets its name from the fact that the flaw targets the translation lookaside buffer, a CPU cache, were leaked to the British tech site, The Register; the side-channel vulnerability can be theoretically exploited to extract encryption keys and private information from programs.

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Intel Chaos Looming?

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Hardware
BSD

OpenBSD disables hyperthreading support for Intel CPUs due to likely data leaks

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Security
BSD

25th Anniversary for FreeBSD

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BSD
  • 25th Anniversary for FreeBSD

    On June 19, 1993 the name FreeBSD was officially agreed on and has been used ever since. Find out more about how to celebrate this important day with us.

  • June 19 Has Been Declared National FreeBSD Day, Happy 25th Anniversary FreeBSD!

    The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce today that June 19 has been declared National FreeBSD Day to celebrate the project's official name 25th anniversary.

    Exactly 25 years ago on this day, on June 19, 1993, David Greenman sent an email to one of the mailing lists available at that point in time to suggest "FreeBSD" as the name for the Unix-like operating system used by billions of people all over the world, which continues to have a positive impact on us every single day.

DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 Released To Fix The Lazy State Save/Restore Bug

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BSD

DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 is now available as the latest stable release to this popular BSD operating system.

While there aren't usually two point releases per cycle for DragonFlyBSD, the v5.2.2 release is coming to address the recent "Lazy FPU" vulnerability affecting Intel CPUs due to Lazy State Save/Restore as the newest CPU speculation bug.

DragonFlyBSD began patching their kernel earlier this month and now those fixes are available in stable form with the DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 release. The OpenBSD folks have also been changing around their kernel and FreeBSD 11.2 RC3 is also mitigated.

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Red Hat and Fedora News

WireGuard v6 Might Be Ready For The Mainline Kernel, ARM Changes Added

The lead developer of the WireGuard in-kernel secure VPN tunnel, Jason Donenfeld, published his sixth round of patches on Tuesday for getting this important networking code and its related Zinc crypto code into the mainline kernel. It's looking like the code might have baked enough for debut in the upcoming 4.20~5.0 kernel cycle. Read more Also: Linux Plumbers Conference: Regular Registration Quota Reached

Spanish Education Distribution Escuelas Linux is Now Available in English

Escuelas Linux is an educational Linux Distribution based on Bodhi Linux. Escuelas (Escuela is Spanish for “School”) includes a host of educational software. It is used by more than 180,000 students and teachers in schools. So what makes Escuelas Linux a preferred choice for educational institutes? Well, apart from a vast selection of educational softwares, Escuelas Linux completely configured user accounts and thus it can be immediately used by a new user (student) without any configuration changes. Read more

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