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BSD: OpenBSD, Benchmarking LLVM/Clang, and AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands In LLVM

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BSD
  • Blog about my blog

     

    I want to try it again, and this time I decided to create a self-hosted blog. Something that runs on my own server and with httpd, the web server that I wrote for OpenBSD.  

    [...]

    i That's why I decided to write my articles, including this one, in Markdown and use another tool such as lowdown to generate the XML pages for sblg.

     

  • Benchmarking LLVM/Clang's New AMD Zen Scheduler Model

    Just prior to LLVM 5.0 being branched yesterday, the AMD Zen scheduler model finally landed in LLVM and has the potential of boosting the performance of generated binaries targeting AMD's Zen "znver1" architecture. Here are some benchmarks of LLVM Clang 4.0 compared to the latest LLVM Clang compiler code when testing with both generic x86-64 optimizations and then optimized builds for the first-generation Zen CPUs, tested on a Ryzen 7 processor.

  • AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands In LLVM, Makes It For LLVM 5.0

    It was coming down to the wire for the new AMD Zen scheduler model in LLVM 5.0 but now it's managed to land just hours before the LLVM 5.0 branching.

    The new Zen "znver1" scheduler model for LLVM was published by AMD in patch form last week and now this morning it's been merged to mainline LLVM. Funny enough, thanks to an Intel developer with commit rights to LLVM due to the AMD contributor not having access.

BSD: OPNsense RC1, TrueNAS X10, LLVM and More

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BSD

Releases of SparkyLinux, Linux RC, and FreeBSD RC

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GNU
Linux
BSD
  • SparkyLinux 5.0 Rolling Released with LXQt, Xfce & MATE ISOs, Based on Debian 10
  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux Kernel 4.13 with the First RC

    A day early than initially expected, the development of the Linux 4.13 kernel was kicked off by Linus Torvalds himself with the first Release Candidate (RC) in the series.

    The merge window was opened during the past two weeks, since the launch of the Linux 4.12 kernel, which is now stable and ready for deployment, so Linus Torvalds decided to close it a day early to avoid late pull requests and push the first Release Candidate of Linux kernel 4.13 out the door for public testing, which seems to be quite huge, but it's normal for this stage.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 OS Just Around the Corner as Last Scheduled RC Sees Light of Day

    The first point release of the FreeBSD 11 operating system is about to be unleashed very soon as developer Glen Barber just announced the release of the third RC development milestone.

    FreeBSD 11.1 was in development for only a month, during which it received three Beta and three RC builds that users could download and test out on their personal computers to report bugs or any other issues. And now that the third RC is out, it looks like it might also be the last one for this cycle.

BSD Releases: NAS4Free 11.1.0.4.4485 and FreeBSD 11.1-RC3

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BSD
  • NAS4Free 11.1.0.4.4485 Released
  • FreeBSD 11.1-RC3 Available

    The third RC build for the FreeBSD 11.1 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, i386, aarch64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

  • FreeBSD 11.1-RC3 Now Available

    The third RC build of the 11.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available. This is expected to be the final RC build of the 11.1-RELEASE cycle.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 Released As The Final Build Is Near

    FreeBSD 11.1 remains on track for releasing later this month.

    FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 is available this weekend as what should be the final release candidate for this minor update to FreeBSD 11. Changes found in FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 include adding deprecation notices to gdb/kgdb/sicontrol/wlconfig and other drivers that will be removed in FreeBSD 12.0, Capsicum support in the Bhyve virtualization code, and various other fixes and clean-ups.

KDE Frameworks 5.36.0 and KDE Plasma 5 on FreeBSD

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KDE
BSD
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.36.0
  • KDE Frameworks 5.36 Adds Unicode 10.0 Support, Improves the VLC Tray Icon

    The KDE Project released the monthly update of its KDE Frameworks collection of more than 70 add-on libraries to Qt, which is designed to provide a wide range of commonly needed functionality to KDE application developers.

    KDE Frameworks 5.36.0 is here as the latest build of the application framework, and it looks like it brings lots of changes for most of the supported components, including Plasma Framework, KTextEditor, KAuth, KBookmarks, NetworkManagerQt, Solid, KIconThemes, KI18n, KIO, and KXMLGUI.

    Additionally, the update adds various improvements to the KWidgetsAddons, KPackage Framework, KDeclarative, KCoreAddons, KConfig, KFileMetaData, KNewStuff, Baloo, ThreadWeaver components, as well as to syntax highlighting, KDELibs 4 support, extra CMake modules, and Breeze icons

  • Wayland, and Weston, and FreeBSD – oh my!

    KDE’s CI system for FreeBSD (that is, what upstream runs to continuously test KDE git code on the FreeBSD platform) is missing some bits and failing some tests because of Wayland. Or rather, because FreeBSD now has Wayland, but not Qt5-Wayland, and no Weston either (the reference implementation of a Wayland compositor).

  • KDE Plasma 5 Making Progress On FreeBSD, With Some Wayland/Weston Support

    KDE developer Adriaan de Groot continues making progress on improving the support when running this desktop environment on FreeBSD. Adriaan has even been experimenting with Wayland/Weston on FreeBSD.

    Adriaan has been focusing on improvements for the KDE continuous integration system for FreeBSD and has pushed Weston and the Qt5-Wayland port to the Area51 repository that provides the bleeding-edge KDE packages for FreeBSD users.

FreeBSD 11.1 RC2 Released

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BSD

FreeBSD developers have announced the second release candidate of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.1.

FreeBSD 11.1 changes since the previous release candidate include VM subsystem fixes, a gpart issue with systems using an SD card as the primary driver, some network fixes, the ena driver has been added, and various other fixes/alterations.

Read more

Also: [REVISED] FreeBSD 11.1-RC2 Now Available

Defending GPL, Bashing GPL

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GNU
OSS
BSD
Legal
  • Permissive and Copyleft Are Not Antonyms

    Using the term “permissive” as an antonym to “copyleft” – or “restrictive” as its synonym – are unhelpful framing. Describe license reciprocity instead.

    Some open source licenses implement a clever hack invented by Richard Stallman where, as a condition of the copyright license, anyone creating derived versions has to agree they will license the new version the same way as the original. In a play on words, this concept is called “copyleft” and many open source licenses implement this hack.

    In its strongest form, the “copyleft” idea can place a condition on the licensing of all the other code compiled together to make the eventual binary executable program. Complying with this requirement can prevent use of business models that deny software freedom to the end user; as a consequence, many commercial software developers avoid the strongest forms of copyleft licensing.

    There are less stringent forms of copyleft. Licenses like the MPL (Mozilla Public License) only require individual files that are modified to be licensed under the same license as the original and don’t extend that requirement to other files used to build the executable. The Eclipse Public License (EPL) has a copyleft provision that’s triggered by distribution of the source code. These scope-restricted variants are all described as “weak copyleft.”

    In discussing these licensing approaches with clients, I’ve often found that these terms “strong copyleft” and “weak copyleft” lead to misunderstandings. In particular, developers can incorrectly apply the compliance steps applicable to one “weak” license to code under another license, believing that all such licenses are the same. As a consequence, I prefer to use different terms.

  • Should the Fair License Replace the GPL?

    Read the full license, and if you find yourself thinking, “That sounds impossible to enforce,” you aren’t alone. To me, the Fair Source License looks like another one of the many attempts I’ve seen to come up with something that looks like a free or open source license, but really isn’t.

FreeBSD 11.1 Release Candidate 1

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BSD

The first release candidate for FreeBSD 11.1 is now available for testing.

FreeBSD 11.1 RC1 shipped this morning with build toolchain fixes, NTPD leap-seconds file added, VM subsystem fixes, memory leak fixes, and other changes.

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE Release Notes

Lumina 1.3.0 Released

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BSD

FreeBSD 11.1 BETA3

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BSD
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LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%