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BSD

Meltdown/PTI Mitigation Impact On BSDs vs. Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

Besides the fresh BSD/Linux disk performance tests, some other tests I ran on various BSDs and Linux distributions this week was looking at the performance impact of Intel Meltdown CPU vulnerability mitigation on each of them, namely the performance impact of using kernel page-table isolation.

On DragonFlyBSD 5.2, TrueOS 18.03, Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, and Clear Linux I ran tests when the mitigation was enabled and then again when it was off for seeing the performance impact.

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Some DragonFly HAMMER2 / FreeBSD ZFS / Linux EXT4 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux
BSD

With the recent release of DragonFlyBSD 5.2 one of the prominent changes is HAMMER2 now being considered stable for most use-cases. I've been running some benchmarks of this file-system compared to alternatives on other operating systems and have some FreeBSD / Linux reference points to share.

Complementing my earlier HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 benchmarks, I ran a set of I/O tests on TrueOS and FreeBSD 11.1 as well as Ubuntu and Clear Linux. All tests were done using the same Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 Skylake system with 256GB Toshiba RD400 NVMe SSD, same default CPU clock frequencies, etc.

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BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

A Look At The HAMMER2 File-System Performance With DragonFlyBSD 5.2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

With this week's release of DragonFlyBSD 5.2 this popular BSD operating system is promoting its own HAMMER2 file-system as stable. As a result, here are a few fresh benchmarks of HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 on DragonFlyBSD 5.2 while more tests are forthcoming.

HAMMER2 received many improvements during the DragonFlyBSD 5.2 development cycle to the point where they now recommend HAMMER2 as the default root file-system for non-clustered systems; the clustered mode for HAMMER2 is yet to be implemented.

On Phoronix we have been covering the HAMMER2 file-system since its inception back in 2012 and have been benchmarking it more recently since it became a fairly viable choice in DragonFlyBSD 5.0. HAMMER2 is a clean sheet design and supports online deduplication, snapshots, LZ4/Zlib compression, encryption, and other features. Our tests have been positive and in the testing of DragonFlyBSD 5.0 and 5.2 we have yet to lose any data to this file-system led by DragonFly lead developer Matthew Dillon.

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Some FreeBSD 11.1, 12.0-CURRENT & TrueOS 18.03 Benchmarks

Filed under
BSD

In addition to the overhauled/rewritten Windows support, the upcoming Phoronix Test Suite 8.0-Aremark is also featuring much better support for the BSDs. As part of that testing, here are some fresh benchmarks of FreeBSD and TrueOS.

While running some fresh benchmarks this week, here are some test results using FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE as it debuted last year, FreeBSD 11.1-STABLE with all current updates including for Spectre/Meltdown mitigation, FreeBSD 12.0-CURRENT as its current form of development and with Spectre/Meltdown mitigation and note that FreeBSD CURRENT ships with some debug bits enabled, and then the recently released TrueOS 18.03 that is derived from FreeBSD 12.0-CURRENT and also mitigated against Spectre/Meltdown.

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More BSD:

DragonFly BSD 5.2

Filed under
BSD

DragonFly version 5.2 brings Meltdown/Spectre mitigation, significant improvements to HAMMER2, ipfw, and graphics acceleration.

The details of all commits between the 5.0 and 5.2 branches are available in the associated commit messages for 5.2.0rc and 5.2.0.

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OpenSSH 7.7 Release Follows OpenBSD 6.3 Release

Filed under
BSD

BSD: More on OpenBSD 6.3 Release and KDE in FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD 6.3 released ( Download of the day )
  • OpenBSD 6.3 released
  • The Shoving Continues

    More KDE4 parts have been moved around on FreeBSD. Basically what we’re seeing is that all the existing KDE4 ports — that is, pretty much all KDE software except the KDE Frameworks 5, which are the kf5-* ports already available — are getting a -kde4 suffix. I resurrected the old filelight from KDE4 times, which we had updated to the modern KDE Applications version some time ago. That is so that KDE4 users can get the authentic (in the case of filelight-kde4, I think that also means “buggy”) experience. Users of x11/kde4 are encouraged to update and upgrade regularly these days, to catch all of the moves of packages. There are no actual updates in here, no new packages, since there aren’t any more upstream releases.

OpenBSD 6.3

Filed under
BSD

This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 6.3. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 6.3.

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TrueOS STABLE 18.03 Release

Filed under
BSD

The TrueOS team is pleased to announce the availability of a new STABLE release of the TrueOS project (version 18.03). This is a special release due to the security issues impacting the computing world since the beginning of 2018. In particular, mitigating the “Meltdown” and “Spectre” system exploits make it necessary to update the entire package ecosystem for TrueOS. This release does not replace the scheduled June STABLE update, but provides the necessary and expected security updates for the STABLE release branch of TrueOS, even though this is part-way through our normal release cycle.

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Also: TrueOS 18.03 Released With Spectre/Meltdown Fixes, Package Updates

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