Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSD

BSD: LLVM 5.0.0, Android NDK, FreeBSD/TrueOS

Filed under
Development
BSD

     
     

  • LLVM 5.0.0 Release

    This release is the result of the community's work over the past six months, including: C++17 support, co-routines, improved optimizations, new compiler warnings, many bug fixes, and more.

  • LLVM 5.0 Released With C++17 Support, Ryzen Scheduler, AMDGPU Vega & Much More

    After delays pushed its release back by about one month, LLVM 5.0 was just released a few minutes ago along with its associated sub-projects like the Clang 5.0 C/C++ compiler.

    LLVM 5.0 features a number of improvements to the ARM and MIPS targets, greater support for the POWER ISA 3.0 in the PowerPC target, the initial AMD Ryzen (znver1) scheduler support (already improved in LLVM 6.0 SVN), support for Intel Goldmont CPUs, greater AVX-512 support, improved Silvermont/Sandybridge/Jaguar schedulers, and initial Radeon Vega (GFX9) support within the AMDGPU target.

  • Android NDK r16: Developers Should Start Using LLVM's libc++ With GCC On The Way Out

    Google has announced the availability today of the Android Native Development Kit (NDK) Release 16. This release is worth mentioning in that Google is now encouraging developers to start using libc++ as their C++ standard library.

    Moving forward, Google will only be supporting LLVM's libc++ as the C++ standard library and not supporting other STLs. The Android platform has already been using libc++ since Lollipop and now they are looking to get more application developers using this STL.

  • Google publishes its documentation style guide for developers

    Documentation is often an afterthought — especially for open-source projects. That can make it harder for newcomers to join a project, for example, and sometimes badly written documentation is worse than having no documentation at all. To help developers write better documentation, Google this week opened up its own developer-documentation style guide.

  • Trying Out FreeBSD/TrueOS On The Xeon Scalable + Tyan GT24E-B7106 Platform

    While we have tested a number of Linux distributions on Intel's new Xeon Scalable platform, here are some initial BSD tests using two Xeon Gold 6138 processors with the Tyan GT24E-B7106 1U barebones server.

  • FreeBSD Developers Tackle AMD Zen/Ryzen Temperature Monitoring Before Linux

    While Linux users of AMD's new Zen-based Ryzen/Threadripper/Epyc processors are still waiting for thermal driver support to hit the mainline Linux kernel, FreeBSD developers have already managed to produce the Zen "Family 17h" CPU thermal monitoring support on their own.

    From this FreeBSD bug report, developers have managed to get the AMD CPU temperature monitoring working for Zen processors under Linux with their existing temperature driver.

FreeBSD 10.4-BETA3 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The third BETA build of the 10.4-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Read more

BSD: FreeBSD in China, Update From OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Trip Report: FreeBSD in China at COPU and LinuxCon

    In May of 2017, we were invited to give a talk about FreeBSD at COPU’s (China Open Source Promotional Unit) Open Source China, Open Source World Summit, which took place June 21-22, in Beijing. This was a tremendous opportunity to talk about the advantages of FreeBSD to the open source leaders and organizations interested in open source. I was honored to represent the Project and Foundation and give the presentation “FreeBSD Advantages and Applications”.

  • A return-oriented programming defense from OpenBSD

    Stack-smashing attacks have a long history; they featured, for example, as a core part of the Morris worm back in 1988. Restrictions on executing code on the stack have, to a great extent, put an end to such simple attacks, but that does not mean that stack-smashing attacks are no longer a threat. Return-oriented programming (ROP) has become a common technique for compromising systems via a stack-smashing vulnerability. There are various schemes out there for defeating ROP attacks, but a mechanism called "RETGUARD" that is being implemented in OpenBSD is notable for its relative simplicity.

BSD: TrueOS, DragonFlyBSD, FreeBSD, OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Trying Out AMD's Ryzen Threadripper On TrueOS, DragonFlyBSD

    Following the AMD Threadripper Linux tests of this week today I finally had a chance to try out some of the BSDs with this 16 core / 32 thread system.

    With the AMD Threadripper 1950X with Gigabyte X399 AORUS Gaming 7 is how I was running these tests. Initial targets were with TrueOS (formerly known as PC-BSD, the desktop-oriented branch of FreeBSD) and DragonFlyBSD.

  • August 2017 Development Projects Update
  • My first patch to OpenBSD

    I followed Preparing a diff and Making your first patch (OpenBSD) to submit my first OpenBSD patch. Guess what? just few hours later, dmesg source file was changed base on my code. Although the final modification is not my code, it is still a great pleasure that I contribute my own effort to help make OpenBSD better!

GhostBSD 11.1 BETA1 is ready!

Filed under
BSD

This first beta of the development of GhostBSD 11.1 release is ready for testing. All MATE and XFCE image is available with i386 and amd64 architectures. We hope to see a lot of people helping to test this next release.

Read more

BSD: HAMMER2 in DragonFlyBSD, OpenBSD Funds

Filed under
BSD
  • HAMMER2 File-System Continues To Stabilize For DragonFlyBSD

    For those interested in the work being done to the HAMMER2 file-system that's being developed by Matthew Dillon for DragonFlyBSD, it is indeed getting closer to being a working reality.

    We recently heard how the next DragonFlyBSD release will offer it as an experimental option following recent advancements to it. That next DragonFly release should be coming in September.

  • OpenBSD Community Goes Platinum [iophk: "paypal is not an option, I'll have to send some bitcoin their way"]

    Paypal and bitcoin donations from the OpenBSD community have made the community the OpenBSD Foundation's first Platinum level contributor for 2017!

  • openbsd changes of note 627

FreeBSD: 10 Things to Do After Fresh Installation of FreeBSD, Second FreeBSD 10.4-Beta Available

Filed under
BSD

Lumina desktop – Show me the light

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

The good thing about Qt (as a framework and technology) is that it powers so many interesting products seamlessly, quietly, unassumingly. The bad thing is, sometimes you may use something that has Qt DNA, and yet, you wouldn’t know it unless explicitly told. Such is the case with the Lumina desktop.

This less-known desktop environment powers mostly BSD operating systems, but it does not seem to have caught on in the Linux world that much. At the moment, you are most likely to find it gracing TrueOS, which uses it as its default interface. And yet, with modern architecture under the hood, it could be a suitable alternative to other mainstream desktop environments. Let’s see what gives.

Read more

Swift/BSD/LLVM

Filed under
Development
BSD

BSD: LLVM, Clang “Absolute FreeBSD”

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM's Clang C/C++ Compiler Is Still Having Problems With ~5% Of Debian Packages

    Debian developer and LLVM/Clang enthusiast Sylvestre Ledru has provided an update regarding the build results for trying to compile the Debian archive using this GCC compiler alternative.

  • Rebuild of Debian using Clang 3.9, 4.0 and 5.0

    tldr: The percentage of failure is decreasing, Clang support is improving but there is a long way to go.

    The goal of this initiative is to rebuild Debian using Clang as a compiler instead of gcc. I have been doing this analysis for the last 6 years.

    Recently, we rebuilt the archive of the Debian archive with Clang 3.9.1 (July 6th), 4.0.1 (July 6th) and 5.0 rc2 (August 20th).

    For various reasons, we didn't perform a rebuild since June 2016 with version 3.8. Therefor, we took the opportunity to do three over the last month.

  • ARC Backend Merged In LLVM

    LLVM 6.0 SVN/Git now has landed a Synopsys DesignWare ARC processor back-end.

  • AF3e status, 22 August 2017

    Your irregular “Absolute FreeBSD” status report!

    It’s at 123,700 words. 12 of 26 chapters exist as first drafts. (Yes, the last report said 7 of 24. I can’t count.) Two more chapters are partially done. One of those partially-done chapters, on “Pre-Install Considerations,” won’t be done until I finish the whole book. I keep going back to add tidbits to it. It’s complete, except when I find something else I have to add to it.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Leftovers

  • This Week in Rust
    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.
  • My trip in Cuba
    Olemis Lang is one of the founders and very active in promoting open source in Cuba. We’ve had some similar experiences in running user groups (I founded the Python french one a decade ago), and were excited about sharing our experience.
  • Mozilla Files Suit Against FCC to Protect Net Neutrality
    Today, Mozilla filed a petition in federal court in Washington, DC against the Federal Communications Commission for its recent decision to overturn the 2015 Open Internet Order.

GNU: GCC 7.3 and LibrePlanet 2018 Keynote Speakers

  • GCC 7.3 Preparing For Release To Ship Spectre Patches
    GNU developers are preparing to quickly ship GCC 7.3 now in order to get out the Spectre patches, a.k.a. the compiler side bits for Retpoline with -mindirect-branch=thunk and friends. It was just this past weekend that the back-ported patches landed in GCC 7 while now GCC 7.3 is being prepared as the branch's next bug-fix point release.
  • Announcing LibrePlanet 2018 keynote speakers
    The keynote speakers for the tenth annual LibrePlanet conference will be anthropologist and author Gabriella Coleman, free software policy expert and community advocate Deb Nicholson, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) senior staff technologist Seth Schoen, and FSF founder and president Richard Stallman. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. The theme of this year's conference is Freedom. Embedded. In a society reliant on embedded systems -- in cars, digital watches, traffic lights, and even within our bodies -- how do we defend computer user freedom, protect ourselves against corporate and government surveillance, and move toward a freer world? LibrePlanet 2018 will explore these topics in sessions for all ages and experience levels.

Open Source in 3-D Printing

  • 17,000% Cost Reduction with Open Source 3D Printing: Michigan Tech Study Showcases Parametric 3D Printed Slot Die System
    We often cover the work of prolific Dr. Joshua Pearce, an Associate Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering at Michigan Technological University (Michigan Tech); he also runs the university’s Open Sustainability Technology (MOST) Research Group. Dr. Pearce, a major proponent for sustainability and open source technology, has previously taught an undergraduate engineering course on how to build open source 3D printers, and four of his former students, in an effort to promote environmental sustainability in 3D printing, launched a business to manufacture and sell recycled and biodegradable filaments.
  • Open Source 3D printing cuts cost from $4,000 to only $0.25 says new study
    Slot die coating is a means of adding a thin, uniform film of material to a substrate. It is a widely used method for the manufacturing of electronic devices – including flat screen televisions, printed electronics, lithium-ion batteries and sensors. Up until recently, slot die components were only machined from stainless steel, restricting development and making the process expensive. Now slot dies for in-lab experimental use can be made on a 3D printer at a fraction of the cost.
  • Dutch firm unveils world's first 3-D-printed propeller
    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing technology has caught the logistics world's attention for its potential to save on warehouse and shipping costs by producing items on demand at any location. In the past two years, for example, UPS Inc. announced plans to partner with software developer SAP SE to build a nationwide network of 3-D printers for use by its customers, and General Electric Co. spent nearly $600 million to buy a three-quarters stake in the German 3-D printing firm Concept Laser GmbH. Recently, transportation companies have begun turning to the same technology for another application, creating the actual hardware used in vehicles that move the freight. For instance, in late 2016, global aircraft maker Airbus S.A.S. contracted with manufacturing firm Arconic Inc. to supply 3-D printed metal parts for its commercial aircraft.

Android Leftovers