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BSD

FreeBSD, Variants Not Affected by Recent GNU Bug

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Security
BSD

Much has been made about a vulnerability in a function in the GNU C Library. And searching far and wide over the Internet, there was little — actually nothing — I could find regarding how this affected BSD variants.

However, you can rest easy, BSDers: Not our circus, not our monkeys.

Dag-Erling Smørgrav, a FreeBSD developer since 1998 and the current FreeBSD Security Officer, writes in his blog that “neither FreeBSD itself nor native FreeBSD applications are affected.”

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FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 2 Is Out with Support for the Latest ZFS Boot Environment

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BSD

Marius Strobl was happy to inform all fans of the FreeBSD operating system that they can now test drive the second Beta build of the upcoming FreeBSD 10.3 release, which should hit the streets in late March 2016.

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DragonFly BSD 4.4.2 Released with OpenSSL 1.0.1r and Kernel Quirks for xHCI USB

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BSD

While not a GNU/Linux operating system, DragonFly BSD remains one of the most appreciated BSD distributions, and it looks like its maintainers are keeping it up-to-date always.

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FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 2 Brings UEFI Fixes & More

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BSD

One week after the first FreeBSD 10.3 beta, FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 2 is now available with more fixes.

Over the past week were some fixes/improvements around FreeBSD's UEFI support, "The UEFI ZFS loader has been updated to support the latest ZFS Boot Environment (BE) loader menu features" and "The UEFI boot loader received several improvements: /boot/config and /boot.config files now are adhered to, multi device boot support works and command line argument parsing has been added."

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Lumina Desktop Getting Ready for FreeBSD 11.0

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BSD

Ken Moore, the lead developer for the BSD-based Lumina Desktop Environment, announced that another step towards the release of a full-fledged desktop environment for BSD variants (and Linux distros, for that matter) has been achieved with the release of version 0.8.8 yesterday.

For those of you keeping score at home, the Lumina Desktop Environment — let’s just call it Lumina for short — is a lightweight, XDG-compliant, BSD-licensed desktop environment focusing on getting work done while minimizing system overhead. Specifically designed for PC-BSD and FreeBSD, it has also been ported to many other BSD variants and Linux distros. Lumina is based on the Qt graphical toolkit and the Fluxbox window manager, and uses a small number of X utilities for various tasks.

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PC-BSD Devs Release Lumina Desktop 0.8.8 Environment with Interface Tweaks

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BSD

PC-BSD's Ken Moore today, February 10, reports the release and general availability of the Lumina Desktop 0.8.8 environment for the project's PC-BSD computer operating system.

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FreeBSD 10.3 Now In Beta

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BSD

FreeBSD developers have released today their first official development media for the upcoming FreeBSD 10.3.

FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 1 is now available from their FTP server.

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Leftovers: BSD

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BSD
  • FreeBSD Ended 2015 With A Lot Of Open-Source Progress

    The FreeBSD project has issued their quarterly status report for Q4'2015 to highlight all the progress they made in ending out 2015.

  • OpenBSD on a MacBookPro8,2 with Intel GPU

    Some MacBooks have two graphics cards, the specific one this post is about is a MacBookPro8,2 (15-inch, Late2011) with an Intel HD Graphics 3000 and an AMD Radeon HD 6750M.

    If you boot any OS into legacy BIOS mode (only option supported by – at this time – most recent release version 5.8 of OpenBSD), it is always the Radeon card that gets activated (except for Windows OS, where Bootcamp/drivers should handle the automatic switching just like in Mac OS).

    You need an external USB WLAN card (or something else, if you want network access), because the internal one is not supported by OpenBSD.

BSD Impact: LLVM, Haiku OS

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BSD
  • LLVM Continues To Dominate Across Many Operating Systems, Software Projects

    LLVM gets GPU exposure via NVIDIA's CUDA, Mesa LLVMpipe, LunarGLASS, the AMDGPU open-source driver stack, SPIR / SPIR-V, and a majority of the OpenCL implementations in the world. Web projects around LLVM include Google's Portable Native Client (PNaCl), WebKit FTL JIT, EmScripten, and WebAssembly, among others.

  • Haiku OS Powered By BSD? It's A Possibility

    François Revol presented at FOSDEM this weekend about the prospects of Haiku OS ever becoming a BSD distribution. Haiku OS, the well known BeOS re-implementation, does currently rely upon some BSD components but more integration is possible.

    Haiku OS is the project that continues to be developed for more than the past decade as a open-source operating system compatible with BeOS.

Exploiting The Full Potential Of ZFS On BSD Systems

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BSD

With ZFS file-system support continuing to spread via OpenZFS, you may be one of the many out there still wondering about the benefits of ZFS.

Allan Jude, a FreeBSD server administrator, is presenting at FOSDEM this weekend about "interesting things you can do with ZFS." His presentation covers ZFS features like data integrity checking, multi-level cache, copy-on-write behavior, snapshots, quotas, transparent compression, incremental replication, and more.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.