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BSD

FreeNAS 11.0 Open-Source Storage Operating System to Be Based on FreeBSD 11

Filed under
BSD

iXsystems' Kris Moore announced the general availability of a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming FreeNAS 11.0 open-source storage operating system.

It appears that this Release Candidate is also the first public development build of FreeNAS 11.0, as the team thoroughly tested the operating system for the past several months and decided that it's stable enough to be promoted straight to the RC state. As its version number suggests, development is currently based on the FreeBSD 11-STABLE operating system.

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Also: FreeNAS 11.0 Release Candidate Up For Testing

FreeNAS 11.0-RC now Available

pfSense 2.3.4 Open-Source Firewall Update Brings System Stability Improvements

pfSense 2.3.4 RELEASE Now Available!

Filed under
Security
BSD

We are happy to announce the release of pfSense® software version 2.3.4!

This is a maintenance release in the 2.3.x series, bringing stability and bug fixes, fixes for a few security issues, and a handful of new features. The full list of changes is on the 2.3.4 New Features and Changes page, including a list of FreeBSD and internal security advisories addressed by this release.

This release includes fixes for 24 bugs and 11 Features.

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TrueOS 2017-02-22

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

TrueOS, which was formerly named PC-BSD, is a FreeBSD-based operating system. TrueOS is a rolling release platform which is based on FreeBSD's "CURRENT" branch, providing TrueOS with the latest drivers and features from FreeBSD. Apart from the name change, TrueOS has deviated from the old PC-BSD project in a number of ways. The system installer is now more streamlined (and I will touch on that later) and TrueOS is a rolling release platform while PC-BSD defaulted to point releases. Another change is PC-BSD used to allow the user to customize which software was installed at boot time, including the desktop environment. The TrueOS project now selects a minimal amount of software for the user and defaults to using the Lumina desktop environment.

Not everything has changed. TrueOS still features many of the same utilities PC-BSD offered, including encrypted removable media, like USB thumb drives, as well as ZFS boot environments. The project, under the new name, still supplies two editions we can download: a Desktop edition and a Server edition. Both editions run on 64-bit x86 computers exclusively. I will be focusing on TrueOS's Desktop offering in this review. The Desktop edition is available through a 2.3GB download. Unlike most Linux distributions, TrueOS offers different downloads depending on whether we intend to copy the installation image to USB or DVD media.

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Akademy 2018 and EuroBSDcon 2017

Filed under
KDE
BSD
  • Akademy 2018 Call for Hosts

    Akademy, KDE's annual conference, requires a place and team for the year 2018. That's why we are looking for a vibrant, enthusiastic spot in Europe that can host us!

  • EuroBSDcon 2017 Call for Proposals

    The call for Talk and Presentation proposals period will close on April 30th, 2017.

TrueOS STABLE Update: 4/24/17

Filed under
OS
BSD

After testing the UNSTABLE push over the weekend, the devs are happy to release a new STABLE update and installation files today! This update consists of two parts: installer changes for those who install TrueOS fresh, and general updates for systems with TrueOS already installed.

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Also:
TrueOS 20170424 Stable Update

Lumina Desktop Gets lumina-mediaplayer

Filed under
BSD
  • 1.3.0 Development Preview: lumina-mediaplayer
  • Lumina Desktop Gets Its Own Media Player

    There's now yet another open-source media player, but this time focused on the BSD-focused Qt-powered Lumina Desktop Environment.

    Lumina Media Player is one of the new additions for the upcoming Lumina 1.3. Lumina Media Player's UI is quite simple so far and allows playing of local audio/video files along with basic audio streaming -- currently implemented for Pandora.

Lumina Desktop Environment 1.3 Progress

Filed under
BSD
  • 1.3.0 Development Preview: New icon themes

    As version 1.3.0 of the Lumina desktop starts getting closer to release, I want to take a couple weeks and give you all some sneak peaks at some of the changes/updates that we have been working on (and are in the process of finishing up).

    This week’s preview covers the new icon theme which will be distributed/used by default in the upcoming version of Lumina.

    The “material-design-[light/dark]” themes[1] are collections of ~800 SVG icons (each) from the Google “material design” application icon theme[2] plus some of the “Templarian” additions[3] to the material design icon pack.

  • Lumina Desktop Environment 1.3 Preparing For Release

    TrueOS developers continue working on their Lumina Desktop Environment and coming up soon is the v1.3 release of their Qt5-powered desktop environment.

    Lumina 1.3 is releasing soon and the developers have begun delivering weekly sneak-peaks of their progress. In today's preview, they share the work done on their new icon theme.

LLVM Additions

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • LLVM-powered Pocl puts parallel processing on multiple hardware platforms

    LLVM, the open source compiler framework that powers everything from Mozilla’s Rust language to Apple’s Swift, emerges in yet another significant role: an enabler of code deployment systems that target multiple classes of hardware for speeding up jobs like machine learning.

    To write code that can run on CPUs, GPUs, ASICs, and FPGAs—hugely useful with machine learning apps—it’s best to use the likes of OpenCL, which allows a program to be written once, then automatically deployed across different types of hardware.

  • Intel Developers Looking To Get Nios II Backend In LLVM

OpenBSD 6.1 Operating System Officially Released, Adds Kaby Lake & ARM64 Support

Filed under
BSD

The OpenBSD 6.1 operating system was officially announced today, April 11, 2017, by developer Theo de Raadt. It's a major release that adds support for new platforms, new hardware, and lots of up-to-date components.

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Also: OpenBSD 6.1 RELEASED

[Release of] OpenBSD 6.1

Filed under
BSD

This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 6.1. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 6.1.

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Also: OpenBSD 6.1 Released: ARM64 Platform Support & More

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD

BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS