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BSD

We have released LibreSSL 3.3.2

Filed under
Security
BSD

The LibreSSL project continues improvement of the codebase to reflect modern, safe programming practices. We welcome feedback and improvements from the broader community. Thanks to all of the contributors who helped make this release possible.

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OpenSSH 8.6 was released on 2021-04-19

Filed under
Security
BSD

This release contains mostly bug fixes.

New features
------------

* sftp-server(8): add a new limits@openssh.com protocol extension that allows a client to discover various server limits, including maximum packet size and maximum read/write length.

* sftp(1): use the new limits@openssh.com extension (when available) to select better transfer lengths in the client.

* sshd(8): Add ModuliFile keyword to sshd_config to specify the location of the "moduli" file containing the groups for DH-GEX.

* unit tests: Add a TEST_SSH_ELAPSED_TIMES environment variable to enable printing of the elapsed time in seconds of each test.

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Audiocasts/Shows: BSDNow, FLOSS Weekly, TLLTS and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • BSDNow 398: Coordinated Mars Time

    FreeBSD 13.0 Full Desktop Experience, FreeBSD on ARM64 in the Cloud, Plan 9 from Bell Labs in Cyberspace, Inferno is open source as well, NetBSD hits donation milestone, grep returns (standard input) on FreeBSD, Random Programming Challenge, OpenBSD Adds Support for Coordinated Mars Time (MTC) and more

  • FLOSS Weekly 625: Endless Sky - Jonathan Steck

    Jonathan Steck joins Jonathan Bennett and Dan Lynch talk to about Endless Sky, an open source video game reminiscent of Elite and Escape velocity, and one that even hearkens back to Spacewar! On FLOSS Weekly, Steck and the show hosts talk about the game itself and the community around it. The project has attracted an interesting bunch of contributors, mainly through its presence on Steam as a free game. There are several challenges the project has overcome, from the sabbatical of the founder, to managing the continued growth and interest in the game. The game is addictive, and the conversation is just as good.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 902

    retro computing, sound cards, mumble woes

  • Conflict | Coder Radio 409

    We visit an alternate reality where Epic wins in their fight against Apple, COBOL reigns supreme, and the halls of great Jedi Temple are lined with Object-C developers.

  • KDE Neon | Plasma Desktop Linux Distrubution

FreeBSD 13.0-RELEASE Announcement

Filed under
BSD

The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 13.0-RELEASE. This is the first release of the stable/13 branch.

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FreeBSD 13.0 – Full Desktop Experience

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

With the release of FreeBSD 13.0 on the horizon, I wanted to see how it shapes up on my Lenovo T450 laptop. Previous major releases on this laptop, using it as a workstation, felt very rough around the edges but with 13, it feels like the developers got it right.

I like to keep things simple when it comes to a desktop operating system so the description below is how I went from a fresh install of FreeBSD 13.0RC1 to a working environment that is based on using the XFCE4 desktop experience.

The FreeBSD install process is simple and well documented in other official locations, so I am not going to repeat that here. However, some of the configuration items that I did select was to use ZFS on Root, encrypted swap and disabled all services (this is a workstation, not a server).

Once the machine had been rebooted, we need to set it up so that suspend/resume works correctly (and tests as such) and enable power management. The main issue that people have getting the resume part of the suspend/resume to work is not having the drm or xf86 drivers loaded that are applicable to the onboard graphics.

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Linux, NetBSD, and OpenBSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD

  • EXT4 With Linux 5.13 Looks Like It Will Support Casefolding With Encryption Enabled - Phoronix

    While EXT4 supports both case-folding for optional case insensitive filenames and does support file-system encryption, at the moment those features are mutually exclusive. But it looks like the upcoming Linux 5.13 kernel will allow casefolding and encryption to be active at the same time.

    Queued this week into the EXT4 file-system's "dev" tree was ext4: handle casefolding with encryption.

  • SiFive FU740 PCIe Support Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.13 - Phoronix

    Arguably the most interesting RISC-V board announced to date is SiFive's HiFive Unmatched with the FU740 RISC-V SoC that features four U74-MC cores and one S7 embedded core. The HiFive Unmatched also has 16GB of RAM, USB 3.2 Gen 1, one PCI Express x16 slot (operating at x8 speeds), an NVMe slot, and Gigabit Ethernet. The upstream kernel support for the HiFive Unmatched and the FU740 SoC continues.

    With the Linux 5.12 cycle there was the start of mainlining SiFive FU740 SoC support and that work is continuing for the upcoming Linux 5.13 cycle.

  •                  

  • The state of toolchains in NetBSD

                     

                       

    While FreeBSD and OpenBSD both switched to using LLVM/Clang as their base system compiler, NetBSD picked a different path and remained with GCC and binutils regardless of the license change to GPLv3. However, it doesn't mean that the NetBSD project endorses this license, and the NetBSD Foundation's has issued a statement about its position on the subject.

                       

    Realistically, NetBSD is more or less tied to GCC, as it supports more architectures than the other BSDs, some of which will likely never be supported in LLVM.

                       

    As of NetBSD 9.1, the latest released version, all supported platforms have recent versions of GCC (7.5.0) and binutils (2.31.1) in the base system. Newer (and older!) versions of GCC can be installed via Pkgsrc, and the following packages are available, going all the way back to GCC 3.3.6: [...]

  •                

  • Review: OpenBSD 6.8 on 8th Gen Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 13.3"

                     

                       

    10 days ago, I bought this X1 Carbon. I immediately installed OpenBSD on it. It took me a few days to settle in and make myself at home, but here are my impressions.

                       

    This was the smoothest experience I've had getting OpenBSD set up the way I like it. The Toshiba NB305 in 2011 was a close second, but the Acer I used between these two laptops required a lot more tweaking of both hardware and kernel to get it to feel like home.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • How to set Proxy and Update FreeBSD

    FreeBSD is an operating system used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms A large community has continually developed it for more than thirty years. Its advanced networking, security, and storage features have made FreeBSD the platform of choice for many of the busiest web sites and most pervasive embedded networking and storage devices.

  • How to install software in FreeBSD (mc example install)

    FreeBSD is an operating system used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms A large community has continually developed it for more than thirty years. Its advanced networking, security, and storage features have made FreeBSD the platform of choice for many of the busiest web sites and most pervasive embedded networking and storage devices.

  • Link-o-Rama: Google testing new targeted ads, FreeBSD’s big oops, Henry Rollins’ record habits & Robyn Hitchcock’s essential records

    More than 20 years ago, when Linux was still wet around the ears, I remember a NetBSD proponent talking my ear off about how Linux was doomed (doomed!) and that the *BSDs would “win” in the long run because their code was more elegant and so forth. I’m still waiting… (To be fair, not all of my predictions and hot takes from the late 90s / early 00s were all that accurate, either.)

FreeBSD 13.0-RC5 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The fifth RC build of the 13.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 13.0-RC5 amd64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 i386 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 powerpc GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 13.0-RC5 powerpc64le GENERIC64LE
o 13.0-RC5 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 13.0-RC5 armv6 RPI-B
o 13.0-RC5 armv7 GENERICSD
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 RPI
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 PINE64
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 PINE64-LTS
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 PINEBOOK
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 ROCK64
o 13.0-RC5 aarch64 ROCKPRO64
o 13.0-RC5 riscv64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC5 riscv64 GENERICSD

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/13.0/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use Git to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/13.0" branch.

A summary of changes since 13.0-RC4 includes:

o COMPAT_FREEBSD32 fill/set dbregs/fpregs has been implemented for
  aarch64.

o Miscellaneous DTrace updates.

o An issue that could potentially affect some services to properly
  restart, notably Nginx, has been addressed.

o Miscellaneous networking fixes.

A list of changes since 12.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/13.0
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/13.0R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 13.0-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/13.0-RC5/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

BASIC-CI images can be found at:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/CI-IMAGES/13.0-RC5/

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 13.0-RC5 Released Due To Lingering Bugs

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, BSDNow, Bad Voltage, and Noodlings

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

FreeBSD 13.0-RC4 Now Available

Filed under
BSD
The fourth RC build of the 13.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 13.0-RC4 amd64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 i386 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 powerpc GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 13.0-RC4 powerpc64le GENERIC64LE
o 13.0-RC4 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 13.0-RC4 armv6 RPI-B
o 13.0-RC4 armv7 GENERICSD
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 RPI
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 PINE64
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 PINE64-LTS
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 PINEBOOK
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 ROCK64
o 13.0-RC4 aarch64 ROCKPRO64
o 13.0-RC4 riscv64 GENERIC
o 13.0-RC4 riscv64 GENERICSD

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/13.0/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use Git to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/13.0" branch.

A summary of changes since 13.0-RC3 includes:

o A fix affecting scripted installations has been addressed.

o Several POWERPC fixes have been included.

o A memory leak in NETMAP_REQ_PORT_INFO_GET has been fixed.

o An issue with local-unbound and some IPv6 deployment has been fixed.

o Historical output range from random(9) has been restored to previous
  behavior.

o OpenSSL has been updated to version 1.1.1k.

o A fix for validation of RDNSS options has been addressed.

o Other miscellaneous items have been addressed.

A list of changes since 12.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/13.0
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/13.0R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 13.0-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/13.0-RC4/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 13.0-RC4 Released With POWER Fixes, Other Bugs Addressed

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pg_statement_rollback v1.3 released

pg_statement_rollback is a PostgreSQL extension to add server side transaction with rollback at statement level like in Oracle or DB2. Release v1.3 of pg_statement_rollback was released. This is a maintenance release to add support to PostgreSQL 14. See ChangeLog for a complete list of changes. Read more Also: PostgreSQL Weekly News - October 24, 2021

pg_statement_rollback v1.3 released

pg_statement_rollback is a PostgreSQL extension to add server side transaction with rollback at statement level like in Oracle or DB2. Release v1.3 of pg_statement_rollback was released. This is a maintenance release to add support to PostgreSQL 14. See ChangeLog for a complete list of changes. Read more Also: PostgreSQL Weekly News - October 24, 2021

Review: Ubuntu 21.10

Ubuntu 21.10 (code name Impish Indri) and its many variant flavors were released on October 14. This release is a non-Long Term Support release, meaning it will be supported for nine months. Like all new releases of Ubuntu, Ubuntu 21.10 comes with numerous updates and enhancements. The most notable of these changes are the customized GNOME 40 desktop and Firefox being a Snap instead of a Deb package. Both of these changes are explored in depth in this review. Installing Ubuntu 21.10 I began by downloading the 2.9GB ISO and copying it to a flash drive. Booting the computer from the flash drive resulted in an extremely familiar experience. Unfortunately, the new installer currently being worked on did not make it into this release, so Ubuntu 21.10 still provides the same installation experience as all the recent releases of Ubuntu. Read more

Indie dev finds that Linux users generate more, better bug reports

An indie developer has found an interesting observation: Though only 5.8% of his game's buyers were playing on Linux, they generated over 38% of the bug reports. Not because the Linux platform was buggier, either. Only 3 of the roughly 400 bug reports submitted by Linux users were platform specific, that is, would only happen on Linux. The developer, posting as Koderski for developer Kodera Software on Reddit, makes indie game ΔV: Rings of Saturn—that's Delta V, or DV, for the non-rocket-science-literate. It's a hard science, physics-based space mining and piracy game that I quite like, personally, for its blend of playability that still honors the basics of spaceflight. If you quite like the space combat of, say, The Expanse, DV is a sim that might be for you. Koderski says he's sold a little over 12,000 copies of his game, and about 700 of those were bought by Linux players. "I got 1040 bug reports in total, out of which roughly 400 are made by Linux players," says Koderski's post. "That’s one report per 11.5 users on average, and one report per 1.75 Linux players. That’s right, an average Linux player will get you 650% more bug reports." Koderski's numbers are a limited sample size drawn from one person's experience, but tell a compelling story. Read more