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BSD

FreeBSD 10.4-BETA3 Now Available

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BSD

The third BETA build of the 10.4-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

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BSD: FreeBSD in China, Update From OpenBSD

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BSD
  • Trip Report: FreeBSD in China at COPU and LinuxCon

    In May of 2017, we were invited to give a talk about FreeBSD at COPU’s (China Open Source Promotional Unit) Open Source China, Open Source World Summit, which took place June 21-22, in Beijing. This was a tremendous opportunity to talk about the advantages of FreeBSD to the open source leaders and organizations interested in open source. I was honored to represent the Project and Foundation and give the presentation “FreeBSD Advantages and Applications”.

  • A return-oriented programming defense from OpenBSD

    Stack-smashing attacks have a long history; they featured, for example, as a core part of the Morris worm back in 1988. Restrictions on executing code on the stack have, to a great extent, put an end to such simple attacks, but that does not mean that stack-smashing attacks are no longer a threat. Return-oriented programming (ROP) has become a common technique for compromising systems via a stack-smashing vulnerability. There are various schemes out there for defeating ROP attacks, but a mechanism called "RETGUARD" that is being implemented in OpenBSD is notable for its relative simplicity.

BSD: TrueOS, DragonFlyBSD, FreeBSD, OpenBSD

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BSD
  • Trying Out AMD's Ryzen Threadripper On TrueOS, DragonFlyBSD

    Following the AMD Threadripper Linux tests of this week today I finally had a chance to try out some of the BSDs with this 16 core / 32 thread system.

    With the AMD Threadripper 1950X with Gigabyte X399 AORUS Gaming 7 is how I was running these tests. Initial targets were with TrueOS (formerly known as PC-BSD, the desktop-oriented branch of FreeBSD) and DragonFlyBSD.

  • August 2017 Development Projects Update
  • My first patch to OpenBSD

    I followed Preparing a diff and Making your first patch (OpenBSD) to submit my first OpenBSD patch. Guess what? just few hours later, dmesg source file was changed base on my code. Although the final modification is not my code, it is still a great pleasure that I contribute my own effort to help make OpenBSD better!

GhostBSD 11.1 BETA1 is ready!

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BSD

This first beta of the development of GhostBSD 11.1 release is ready for testing. All MATE and XFCE image is available with i386 and amd64 architectures. We hope to see a lot of people helping to test this next release.

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BSD: HAMMER2 in DragonFlyBSD, OpenBSD Funds

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BSD
  • HAMMER2 File-System Continues To Stabilize For DragonFlyBSD

    For those interested in the work being done to the HAMMER2 file-system that's being developed by Matthew Dillon for DragonFlyBSD, it is indeed getting closer to being a working reality.

    We recently heard how the next DragonFlyBSD release will offer it as an experimental option following recent advancements to it. That next DragonFly release should be coming in September.

  • OpenBSD Community Goes Platinum [iophk: "paypal is not an option, I'll have to send some bitcoin their way"]

    Paypal and bitcoin donations from the OpenBSD community have made the community the OpenBSD Foundation's first Platinum level contributor for 2017!

  • openbsd changes of note 627

FreeBSD: 10 Things to Do After Fresh Installation of FreeBSD, Second FreeBSD 10.4-Beta Available

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BSD

Lumina desktop – Show me the light

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Reviews
BSD

The good thing about Qt (as a framework and technology) is that it powers so many interesting products seamlessly, quietly, unassumingly. The bad thing is, sometimes you may use something that has Qt DNA, and yet, you wouldn’t know it unless explicitly told. Such is the case with the Lumina desktop.

This less-known desktop environment powers mostly BSD operating systems, but it does not seem to have caught on in the Linux world that much. At the moment, you are most likely to find it gracing TrueOS, which uses it as its default interface. And yet, with modern architecture under the hood, it could be a suitable alternative to other mainstream desktop environments. Let’s see what gives.

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Swift/BSD/LLVM

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Development
BSD

BSD: LLVM, Clang “Absolute FreeBSD”

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BSD
  • LLVM's Clang C/C++ Compiler Is Still Having Problems With ~5% Of Debian Packages

    Debian developer and LLVM/Clang enthusiast Sylvestre Ledru has provided an update regarding the build results for trying to compile the Debian archive using this GCC compiler alternative.

  • Rebuild of Debian using Clang 3.9, 4.0 and 5.0

    tldr: The percentage of failure is decreasing, Clang support is improving but there is a long way to go.

    The goal of this initiative is to rebuild Debian using Clang as a compiler instead of gcc. I have been doing this analysis for the last 6 years.

    Recently, we rebuilt the archive of the Debian archive with Clang 3.9.1 (July 6th), 4.0.1 (July 6th) and 5.0 rc2 (August 20th).

    For various reasons, we didn't perform a rebuild since June 2016 with version 3.8. Therefor, we took the opportunity to do three over the last month.

  • ARC Backend Merged In LLVM

    LLVM 6.0 SVN/Git now has landed a Synopsys DesignWare ARC processor back-end.

  • AF3e status, 22 August 2017

    Your irregular “Absolute FreeBSD” status report!

    It’s at 123,700 words. 12 of 26 chapters exist as first drafts. (Yes, the last report said 7 of 24. I can’t count.) Two more chapters are partially done. One of those partially-done chapters, on “Pre-Install Considerations,” won’t be done until I finish the whole book. I keep going back to add tidbits to it. It’s complete, except when I find something else I have to add to it.

BSD: DragonFly, LLVM, and Kernel Syspatches

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BSD
  • Next DFly release will have an initial HAMMER2 implementation

    The next DragonFly release (probably in September some time) will have an initial HAMMER2 implementation.  It WILL be considered experimental and won't be an installer option yet.  This initial release will only have single-image support operational plus basic features.  It will have live dedup (for cp's), compression, fast recovery, snapshot, and boot support out of the gate.

  • Next DragonFlyBSD Release Will Offer Experimental HAMMER2

    After the HAMMER2 file-system was announced back in 2012, the next DragonFlyBSD release likely to be released in September will offer experimental support for this next-generation HAMMER file-system.

    A few days back I reported on HAMMER2 looking like it was getting ready for its debut and DragonFlyBSD/HAMMER lead developer Matthew Dillon has now announced it will indeed be an experimental feature in the next release of this BSD operating system.

  • Cortex-A75 and Cortex-A55 Now Supported By LLVM

    ARM's latest big.LITTLE cores are now supported by LLVM, the Cortex A75 and A55.

  • RISC-V Support Continues Advancing For LLVM

    For those interested in the RISC-V open-source, royalty-free RISC-V instruction set architecture, the LLVM compiler support for it continues advancing.

    Alex Bradbury gas written a status update concerning the RISC-V LLVM support. At the moment the code remains out-of-tree for all the active development work. With that code, most of the GCC torture suite can compile for RV32I.

  • Kernel syspatches will soon be smaller thanks to KARL

     

    [...] the groundwork is done for having syspatch update only the kernel object files that have changed.

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FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers