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BSD

Linux Foundation, BSDs and Servers

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Linux
Server
BSD
  • Like Linux, It’s Very Hard to Create the Next Bitcoin (BTC)
  • Linux Foundation launches Urban Computing Foundation

    The Linux Foundation, best known for its stewardship of the kernel which bears its name, has announced it is branching out into the world of smart cities and autonomous vehicles through the formation of the Urban Computing Foundation.

    Originally a hobby project of then-student Linus Torvalds, the Linux kernel has grown into one of the most widely-deployed operating system kernels in history. It's used in everything from games consoles to pacemakers, supercomputing to routers, and now the Linux Foundation is looking to push it still wider with the formation of the new Urban Computing Foundation.

  • Intel Has Been Recently Ramping Up Their FreeBSD Support

    While Intel's open-source Linux support is largely stellar and was a big focus of this week's Open-Source Technology Summit in Washington, their FreeBSD support isn't nearly as polished but over the past roughly year and a half they've been establishing a FreeBSD team and working towards feature parity and supporting critical functionality for their customers.

    As written about last year, Ben Widawsky who had long been part of their Linux graphics driver team began part of the effort on improving the FreeBSD support around Intel hardware. Ben spoke Wednesday at OSTS 2019 about this FreeBSD improvement voyage.

  • DragonFlyBSD Flips On Compiler-Based Retpoline Support For Its Kernel, Also Adds SMAP/SMEP

    In addition to DragonFlyBSD seeing MDS "Zombie Load" mitigations this week, the DragonFlyBSD kernel now has better Spectre Variant Two coverage with making use of the GCC compiler support.

    DragonFlyBSD switched to GCC 8 by default at the end of last year and that allows them now to enable -mindirect-branch=thunk-inline as part of the Spectre Variant Two mitigation strategy. Their earlier GCC5 compiler didn't offer this support albeit it took them a while still to enable this compiler flag by default when compiling the kernel.

  • Roberto Alsina: Coffee As a Service Architecture

    Today I was in a meeting with recruiters (yes, really) because they want to be better at technical recruiting and they had the idea that talking to me would help them (oh, sweet summer children).

    A nice time was had by all (I hope) and at one point I was asked about what architecture was, and more specifically, about the difference between microservices and a monolith.

    Which I tried to explain using what I had at hand: coffee cups, sugar dispensers, a spoon and so on. It didn't quite work out but I kept thinking about it on my way home and ... let's try again.

    [...]

    So, that's why nowadays most people prefer to pay the performance penalty of a microservice architecture instead of using an awesome monolith.

  • IBM 'cloudifies' mainframe software pricing, adds hybrid, private cloud services

    Specifically IBM rolled out Tailored Fit Pricing for the IBM Z mainframe which offers two consumption-based pricing models that can help customers cope with ever-changing workload – and hence software – costs.

    Tailored Fit Pricing removes the need for complex and restrictive capping, which typically weakens responsiveness and can impact service level availability, IBM said. IBM’s standard monthly mainframe licensing model calculates costs as a “rolling four-hour average” (R4HA) which would determine cost based on a customer’s peak usage during the month. Customers would many time cap usage to keep costs down, experts said

    Systems can now be configured to support optimal response times and service level agreements, rather than artificially slowing down workloads to manage software licensing costs, IBM stated.

Audio/Video: TLLTS, RHEL 8, Fedora 30, Freespire 4.8, Dragonfly 5.4.2

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

DragonFlyBSD Updates Its Radeon/TTM Driver Code Against Linux 3.18 Bits

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BSD

The Radeon (and Intel) graphics driver support on DragonFlyBSD has improved a lot compared to where it was at many years ago, but it remains a perpetual catch-up game with the porting of this driver code from Linux to their BSD kernel.

Like other BSDs, DragonFlyBSD continues re-basing their Radeon and Intel driver code against what's in the mainline Linux kernel given that's where the vendors are working on the open-source graphics support without any catered driver to the BSDs, with the exception being NVIDIA and their binary driver being offered with official FreeBSD support. But due to the changes needed when re-basing the code in adapting to the latest interface changes, it's quite a burden to maintain. While the Linux 5.1 kernel is expected to be out this weekend, DragonFlyBSD is generally playing with late 3.x Linux kernels and early 4.x bits.

Read more

Also: OpenBSD 6.5 | BSD Now 296

BSD: ZFS, LLVM, FreeBSD 12

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BSD
  • OpenZFS / ZFS On Linux Is Introducing A Code of Conduct To Encourage New Contributors

    In addition to squaring up the massive ZFS On Linux 0.8 milestone and helping with bringing ZFS On Linux to FreeBSD, the OpenZFS / ZFS On Linux team is also assembling a Code of Conduct.

  • LLVM's New "f18" Fortran Compiler Sub-Project Likely To Be Called... Fortran

    The LLVM Foundation recently accepted the f18 Fortran compiler as a new LLVM sub-project so this hugely popular compiler stack will finally have first-rate Fortran language support.

    The current "f18" compiler code has been worked on by the likes of NVIDIA and ARM a new replacement to the earlier "Flang" Fortran/Clang-inspired compiler effort.

    While f18 has been approved for becoming part of LLVM, the foundation has asked that it be renamed to avoid any confusion and make it explicitly clear about what it is.

  • The Future of AST-Matching refactoring tools (EuroLLVM and ACCU)

    I recently made a trip to LLVM in Brussels and ACCU in Bristol. It was a busy week. I gave a talk at both conferences on the topic of the future of AST Matchers-based refactoring.

    As usual, the ‘hallway track’ also proved useful at both conferences, leading to round-table discussions at the LLVM conference with other interested contributors and getting to talk to other developers interested in refactoring tooling at ACCU.

  • FreeBSD 12 as an alternative to the Linux desktop

    FreeBSD is a reliable and highly secure server operating system. We look at how FreeBSD fares as a desktop system.

    FreeBSD has been around since 1993 and enjoys an excellent reputation, especially in the server sector. The system is based on the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD), a Unix-style operating system whose origins go back to 1977. Numerous BSD variants, such as TrueOS (the former PC-BSD), Dragonfly BSD, or GhostBSD, make the scene just as confusing as the Linux world.

    With the exception of TrueOS and GhostBSD, BSD derivatives don't focus on the desktop but on servers, storage appliances, routers, and firewalls. However, mainline BSD variants like FreeBSD have extensive software repositories with plenty of desktop tools if you're ready to look for them. We decided to explore the possibility of setting up a desktop system on FreeBSD.

FreeBSD "Package Base" Is Now Ready For Testing - More Conveniently Update FreeBSD

Filed under
Development
BSD

The developers at iX Systems continue to be on a roll this spring. Just days after announcing their new FreeBSD images built with "ZFS On Linux" for testing as the new FreeBSD ZFS implementation, this weekend they announced their new FreeBSD "pkgbase" images are now available for testing.

While FreeBSD has long had the "pkg" utility for easily installing packages on FreeBSD, using Pkg to manage the FreeBSD base system hasn't been possible.

Read more

Also: Intel Continues Working On Their SYCL Compiler For Upstreaming To LLVM

FreeBSD Is Looking For Your Feedback To Guide Its Priorities

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BSD

If you are interested in FreeBSD at all, their core team of developers is hoping you will take a few minutes and participate in their survey.

Running now for the next roughly two weeks is the FreeBSD 2019 Community Survey. They will be using the results from this survey to help guide their priorities and efforts moving forward.

Read more

Direct: FreeBSD 2019 Community Survey

BSD: A Look at NomadBSD and Audiocasts About BSDs and ZFS

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BSD
  • NomadBSD, a BSD for the Road

    As regular It’s FOSS readers should know, I like diving into the world of BSDs. Recently, I came across an interesting BSD that is designed to live on a thumb drive. Let’s take a look at NomadBSD.

    [...]

    This German BSD comes with an OpenBox-based desktop with the Plank application dock. NomadBSD makes use of the DSB project. DSB stands for “Desktop Suite (for) (Free)BSD” and consists of a collection of programs designed to create a simple and working environment without needing a ton of dependencies to use one tool. DSB is created by Marcel Kaiser one of the lead devs of NomadBSD.

    Just like the original BSD projects, you can contact the NomadBSD developers via a mailing list.

  • Fun with funlinkat() | BSD Now 295

    Introducing funlinkat(), an OpenBSD Router with AT&T U-Verse, using NetBSD on a raspberry pi, ZFS encryption is still under development, Rump kernel servers and clients tutorial, Snort on OpenBSD 6.4, and more.

  • Snapshot Sanity | TechSNAP 402

    We continue our take on ZFS as Jim and Wes dive in to snapshots, replication, and the magic on copy on write.

    Plus some handy tools to manage your snapshots, rsync war stories, and more!

OS108 Yields NetBSD Desktop Operating System Powered By MATE

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BSD

Over the past decade there's been talks on a few occasions about either spinning NetBSD as a desktop platform or offering up various desktop usability improvements to make it easier to use this BSD as a desktop operating system. In 2019 there still isn't a great desktop experience to NetBSD but the new "OS108" is seeking to improve that with a NetBSD OS paired with the MATE desktop environment.

A Phoronix reader pointing out to us the newly-released OS108 is the first time we've heard of this NetBSD derivative.

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OpenBSD 6.5 Released With RETGUARD, OpenRSYNC

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BSD

OpenBSD 6.5 was released today, about one week ahead of schedule for this security-minded BSD operating system. OpenBSD 6.5 is bringing several prominent new features including RETGUARD as its new stack protector and OpenRSYNC as its ISC-licensed in-progress replacement to rsync.

OpenBSD 6.5's new RETGUARD functionality aims to be a better stack protector on x86_64 and AArch64 with instrumenting every function return with better security properties than their traditional stack protector.

Read more

Also: OpenBSD 6.5

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 Rolls Out With Two Dozen Fixes

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BSD

While awaiting DragonFlyBSD 5.6 as the BSD operating system's next feature release, DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 has been released as the newest stable point release.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 provides just over two dozen fixes over the previous 5.4.1 point release from last December. Among the changes to find with DragonFlyBSD 5.4.2 are updating the list of USB 3.0 PCI IDs from FreeBSD, fixing various panics, adding an AC256 sound quirk, adding /dev/part-by-label interface, updating the kernel's ACPI code from FreeBSD, and a variety of other fixes.

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