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BSD

LLVM and GNU Compilers: Glow and GCC 9

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • Thank you from the Glow Developers

    Hello LLVM community,

    We have been working hard on a new domain specific optimizing compiler, and we are pleased to announce that we have recently open sourced the project!  We would like to introduce you to Glow, an optimizing compiler for neural networks!

  • Glow: An LLVM Optimizing Compiler For Neural Networks

    The latest interesting use of the LLVM compiler infrastructure stack is for Glow, a machine learning / neural network optimizing compiler.

    Glow is intended to be used by high-level machine learning frameworks and it in turn -- via leveraging LLVM -- will generate optimized code for different hardware targets.

  • GCC 9.0 Sees A Number Of BRIG Improvements For HSA

    Being very early in the GCC 9.0 development cycle following the GCC 8 stable release earlier this week, a number of BRIG front-end improvements have landed. BRIG as a reminder is the binary form for HSA IL.

    In January of 2017 is when the GCC BRIG support landed in time for GCC 7. With the GCC 8 release there are some BRIG improvements for this compiler's HSA support, but nothing really too notable. Sadly, since this code has been merged, I haven't heard of any major users of this code intended for supporting HSA accelerators with AMD seemingly divesting in HSA.

KDE and BSD Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
BSD
  • Qt on Microcontrollers (MCU)

    People often ask us about if it’s possible to use Qt for software development on microcontrollers (MCU), and if Qt can run without an operating system (“bare metal”). Today we will answer these questions and show you some concrete examples.

  • KDE Plasma 5 Stack Should Now Be In Good Shape For FreeBSD Ports

    Following years of work in bringing the KDE Plasma 5 desktop to FreeBSD, it's getting into shape and the x11/kde5 package is now in the ports tree for easing the process of setting up the modern KDE desktop stack.

    On FreeBSD installations, from the ports tree it should now be as easy as fetching x11/xorg x11/sddm x11/kde5 for getting the latest KDE Plasma desktop, KDE Frameworks 5, and KDE Applications going for a desktop environment. Up until now this was only possible if using the "Area51" repository on FreeBSD.

  • Welcome x11/kde5 to the FreeBSD Ports Tree

    There is no KDE5. There are KDE Frameworks 5 (releasing monthly, now reaching version 5.45) and KDE Plasma Desktop 5 (releasing quarterly, I think, now 5.12) and KDE Applications (releasing semi-anually, called 18.04).

    For the FreeBSD ports tree, there is a x11/kde5. It is a metaport, which means it collects other ports together; in this case, x11/kf5-frameworks (metaport for all the frameworks), x11/plasma5-plasma-desktop and a fistful of KDE Applications metaports (e.g. the metaport for KDE games, and the metaport for KDE graphics applications, and the metaport for what-we-consider-essential KDE applications like konsole, konqueror, dolphin, and okular). So, from a bare FreeBSD installation, installing x11/xorg, x11/sddm, and x11/kde5 should get you close to a working modern KDE Desktop experience. Throw in www/falkon and devel/kdevelop for a developer workstation, or graphics/krita for an artists workstation, and you’ve got a daily driver.

  • The Akademy 2018 program is now available

    Akademy 2018 organisers have published the program for the conference part of the event. This year the event will be held in Vienna, and talks will take place on the 11th and 12th of August.

  • One Of LLVM's Top Contributors Quits Development Over CoC, Outreach Program

    Rafael Avila de Espindola is the fifth most active contributor to LLVM with more than 4,300 commits since 2006, but now he has decided to part ways with the project.

    Rafael posted a rather lengthy mailing list message to fellow LLVM developers today entitled I am leaving llvm. 

    [...]

    Of the 900+ authors to LLVM, Rafael was the fifth most contributor to LLVM by commit count with 4,344 commits (2.65% of all commits0 and in the process added 157,679 lines of code. He had been contributing since 14 May 2006 and was many times the most active LLVM contributor in a given month while working for the likes of Google and Mozilla. In fact, for 2013 through 2015 he was the most active author each year. His contributions will certainly be missed.

  • Happy Birthday, GPS Stash Hunt!

    On an unrelated side note, I’m working on consolidating mirsolutios.de (as my business is long defunct) into www.mirbsd.org (as “The MirOS Project” was folded back into “MirBSD”, i.e. my private /usr/src and /usr/ports, this year). This simplifies some stuff, I’ll need no vhosts, and EU-DSGVO conformity should come with less effort (I’m reducing logging alongside).

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

BSD: DragonFlyBSD's Latest and NetBSD 8.0 Release Candidate 1

Filed under
BSD

OPNsense 18.1.6

Filed under
BSD

For more than 3 years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the code base, quick and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

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OpenBSD and NetBSD

Filed under
BSD

NetBSD 8.0 RC1 Available, Bringing Initial USB 3.0 Support & Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation

Filed under
BSD

It's a busy month for the BSDs with DragonFlyBSD 5.2 having come along with OpenBSD 6.3 and right before that was TrueOS 18.03. Now there's finally the release candidate of the long-awaited NetBSD 8.0 update.

NetBSD 7.0 arrived back in October 2015 while the NetBSD 8.0 release should not be too much further out. Arguably most interesting with NetBSD 8.0 is its finally bring initial USB 3.0 support though the change-log currently just describes it as "some USB 3 support."

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BSD: LLVM and OpenBSD on the Desktop

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM Is Playing A Big Role With Vulkan/SPIR-V Compilers

    The usage of LLVM as part of the graphics driver stack continues to be picked up now especially in the Vulkan/SPIR-V world.

    With the new NVIDIA 396 driver series there is their new "NVVM" compiler stack for SPIR-V, the IR used by Vulkan and OpenCL and now can be consumed by OpenGL 4.6 too.

  • OpenBSD on my fanless desktop computer

     

    I’ve been using OpenBSD on servers for years as a web developer, but never had a chance to dive in to system administration before. If you appreciate the simplicity of OpenBSD and you have to give it a try on your desktop.

Meltdown/PTI Mitigation Impact On BSDs vs. Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

Besides the fresh BSD/Linux disk performance tests, some other tests I ran on various BSDs and Linux distributions this week was looking at the performance impact of Intel Meltdown CPU vulnerability mitigation on each of them, namely the performance impact of using kernel page-table isolation.

On DragonFlyBSD 5.2, TrueOS 18.03, Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, and Clear Linux I ran tests when the mitigation was enabled and then again when it was off for seeing the performance impact.

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Some DragonFly HAMMER2 / FreeBSD ZFS / Linux EXT4 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux
BSD

With the recent release of DragonFlyBSD 5.2 one of the prominent changes is HAMMER2 now being considered stable for most use-cases. I've been running some benchmarks of this file-system compared to alternatives on other operating systems and have some FreeBSD / Linux reference points to share.

Complementing my earlier HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 benchmarks, I ran a set of I/O tests on TrueOS and FreeBSD 11.1 as well as Ubuntu and Clear Linux. All tests were done using the same Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 Skylake system with 256GB Toshiba RD400 NVMe SSD, same default CPU clock frequencies, etc.

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More in Tux Machines

More Malware-Like Behaviour From Chrome and Firefox Introduces Firefox Monitor, Other News

  • Now Chrome Doesn’t Delete “Google Cookies” Even If You Clear All Cookies
    Yet another privacy concern for Google Chrome users! Previously, we talked about Google’s auto-login mechanism which is hijacking our local Google Chrome data. Now, another Chrome 69 setting has come to light which is risking our freedom to remove data.
  • Introducing Firefox Monitor, Helping People Take Control After a Data Breach
    Data breaches, when information like your username and password are stolen from a website you use, are an unfortunate part of life on the internet today. It can be hard to keep track of when your information has been stolen, so we’re going to help by launching Firefox Monitor, a free service that notifies people when they’ve been part of a data breach. After testing this summer, the results and positive attention gave us the confidence we needed to know this was a feature we wanted to give to all of our users.
  • Firefox Monitor, take control of your data
    That sinking feeling. You’re reading the news and you learn about a data breach. Hackers have stolen names, addresses, passwords, survey responses from a service that you use. It seems like we’re having that sinking feeling more and more. But we don’t have to despair. While technology will never be impervious to attacks, we can make sure that we’re able to respond when we learn that our personal data and passwords are part of a breach.
  • Firefox Quantum, Beta and Nightly Affected by ‘Reap Firefox’ Crash Attack
    A particular vulnerability in the present Firefox browser has been unraveled by the security researcher and basically the creater of this bug, Sabri Haddouche in his blog post. He pointed towards a bug which brings the browser and also the operating system possibly with a ‘Reap Firefox’ attack crash. This vulnerability affects Firefox versions working under Linux, macOS and Windows.
  • $1.6 Million to Connect Unconnected Americans: Our NSF-WINS Grand Prize Winners
    After months of prototyping and judging, Mozilla and the National Science Foundation are fueling the best and brightest ideas for bringing more Americans online Today, Mozilla and the National Science Foundation (NSF) are announcing the grand prize winners in our Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (NSF-WINS) Challenges — an audacious competition to connect millions of unconnected Americans. The grand prize winners are as novel as they are promising: An 80-foot tower in rural Appalachia that beams broadband connectivity to residents. And, an autonomous network that fits in two suitcases — and can be deployed after earthquakes and hurricanes.

Endless OS – A Beautifully Unique Linux Distribution for Your Family

Endless OS is a free Linux-based Operating System that makes computers fun to use. It features a beautiful UI, a somewhat locked-down app manager, and tons of educational software. Endless OS is mostly used to teach computing all over the world so the company has made it simulate a smartphone experience. In place of an app drawer, it uses shortcuts arranged in a grid view on the desktop. Sort of like an iPhone. You can add/delete apps from view as well as create folders for organizing them. Read more

Wayland future and legacy

First I directly admit on what I did teaser for 5.14 in my last update but what will not make it: generic gamma color correction per display. There are two reasons for it. The first one is that some preliminary patches, which needed to be merged first, endured long review phases. The second reason is, that when these patches finally were accepted I had shifted my focus on some other topics, which I decided to give an higher priority. Before delving into these other topics, a short analysis on why the reviews took so long: first there were of course some improvements possible to my patches, but after these got pointed out in the reviews I did fix them back then pretty quickly. The more striking reason is though that we are just short on people who can actually review KWin code changes, in particular with Martin being not maintainer anymore. That is not only a problem for my proposed code changes, but for anyone’s patches to KWin. And this hasn’t improved since back then. We must find a way to reduce the review pressure on the people being capable of doing reviews somehow, at best with only a minimal hit in code quality. I don’t have a full solution for this problem yet, we will see if we find a good one. After this is out of the way, let us talk about these other features, which I prioritized higher. Read more

Games: Release of PlayOnLinux 5.0 Alpha, Aspyr Media, Geneshift, GOG and DotLine

  • Release of PlayOnLinux 5.0 alpha 1
    I'm aware that it has been a while since the last time we gave news to you. Be reassured, the project is moving on and here we are to give you some news.
  • Aspyr Media have a big sale going on the Humble Store, some sweet deals to be had
    For those of you in the mood to start you week with some fun new games, Humble Store is doing an Aspyr Media sale.
  • Top-down shooter Geneshift is getting a Battle Royale mode and it sounds like a lot of fun
    Geneshift (also known as Mutant Factions or Subvein) is a top-down shooter with some seriously good action that's currently in Early Access and the developer has decided to add a Battle Royale mode. Initially, I thought this was a joke. However, it's very much a real thing.
  • GOG added two more Visual Novels with Linux support, Highway Blossoms and A Kiss For The Petals
    For those who love Visual Novels, you might want to know that GOG have expanded their collection a little again recently. The two titles are Highway Blossoms and A Kiss For The Petals - Maidens of Michael. Neither game is particularly new, although it's worth noting that A Kiss For The Petals - Maidens of Michael was removed from Steam so GOG is the easiest option to get it at the moment.
  • Challenging minimalist puzzle game 'DotLine' released with native Linux support
    DotLine from The Selenite Forge who also made Bionic Attack is a minimalist puzzle game that tries to challenge your brain, out now with native Linux support. Note: Key provided by the developer. The basic idea of the game is really simple. You have to guide a ball from start to end, the problem is the path it needs to take is all messed up and you've got the wonderful job of rotating everything into the correct position. What makes it challenging, is that as soon as you rotate the first piece, the ball will begin rolling and so it becomes a mad dash to get everything right. Even if you don't do anything, you only get two seconds before it starts.