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BSD

OpenBSD 6.0

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD 6.0 Is Out With Better ARM Support, More SMP Fun, Dropped Linux Emulation

    Kicking off September the OpenBSD developers announced the release of OpenBSD 6.0.

    Highlights for OpenBSD 6.0 include Linux-only binary emulation being removed due to being unmaintained and seldom used, updates to all the Open*/Libre packages like LibreSSL and OpenSSH, continued work on SMP improvements, ARMv7 platform improvements, and W^X support being enabled by default for the base system.

  • OpenBSD 6.0

GhostBSD 10.3 "Enoch" Officially Released with ZFS and UEFI Support, More

Filed under
BSD

Today, August 31, 2016, the GhostBSD project was pleased to announce the general availability of the final release of their GhostBSD 10.3 "Enoch" operating system based on the latest FreeBSD technologies.

GhostBSD 10.3 has been in development for the past 12 months, during which the development team released two Alpha builds, a Beta milestone, and a Release Candidate, which pretty much contained all the features contained in the final version.

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Also: GhostBSD 10.3 Finally Rolls Out, Offers MATE & Xfce Atop ZFS

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting

    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages.

    During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.

  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Filed under
BSD

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system.

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The Importance of BSD

Filed under
BSD

The Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) is a Unix operating system developed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley.

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Leftovers: BSD/LLVM

Filed under
Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Open Source History: Why Didn't BSD Beat Out GNU and Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

If you use a free and open source operating system, it's almost certainly based on the Linux kernel and GNU software. But these were not the first freely redistributable platforms, nor were they the most professional or widely commercialized. The Berkeley Software Distribution, or BSD, beat GNU/Linux on all of these counts. So why has BSD been consigned to the margins of the open source ecosystem, while GNU/Linux distributions rose to fantastic prominence? Read on for some historical perspective.

Understanding BSD requires delving far back into the history of Unix, the operating system first released by AT&T Bell Labs in 1969. BSD began life as a variant of Unix that programmers at the University of California at Berkeley, initially led by Bill Joy, began developing in the late 1970s.

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BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Decides To Drop PulseAudio

    DragonFlyBSD developers have decided to remove PulseAudio from their dports packaging system and patch their desktop software to not depend upon this open-source sound server.

    Running PulseAudio on DragonFlyBSD appears to cause problems for users, similar to PulseAudio in its early days on Linux, "the pulseaudio server didn't seem to work and even caused one CPU to spin at 100% usage. Moreover, it seems that firefox, even if built without pulseaudio, would detect if PA was installed and use it over ALSA resulting in no sound and a spinning CPU," according to John Marino who removed PA from DragonFlyBSD.

  • LLVM Clang 3.9 Still On Track For Release Next Week

    LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg tagged LLVM 3.9.0-rc2 on Thursday and it's still looking like LLVM/Clang 3.9 could ship on schedule next week.

    Hans noted in the RC2 announcement, "This is a release candidate in the very real sense that if nothing new comes up, this is be what the final release looks like. There are currently no open release blockers, and no patches in my merge-queue."

Benchmarks: 2 BSDs vs. 7 Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

The operating systems tested for this comparison included CentOS Linux 7, Clear Linux 9710, DragonFlyBSD 4.6.0, Fedora 24, FreeBSD 11.0-Beta 4, Manjaro 16.06.1, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, and a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 16.10. For those wondering about OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, I'll have tests of that Clang-compiled distribution later in the week. This BSD/Linux OS comparison grew out of curiosity sake when first seeking to test how well DragonFlyBSD 4.6 and FreeBSD 11 are performing.

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Hands-on: Lumina Desktop 1.0.0

Filed under
Linux
BSD
HowTos

I saw a release announcement for the first official release (1.0.0) of the Lumina Desktop Environment recently. I am always looking for interesting new developments like this, and the announcement said that Lumina could be easily installed on a variety of Linux distributions, many of which I have installed, so I decided to give it a whirl.

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More in Tux Machines

Radeon RX 580: AMDGPU-PRO vs. DRM-Next + Mesa 17.2-dev

Last week I posted initial Radeon RX 580 Linux benchmarks and even AMDGPU overclocking results. That initial testing of this "Polaris Evolved" hardware was done with the fully-open Radeon driver stack that most Linux enthusiasts/gamers use these days. The AMDGPU-PRO driver wasn't tested for those initial articles as it seems to have a diminishing user-base and largely focused for workstation users. But for those wondering how AMDGPU-PRO runs with the Radeon RX 580, here are some comparison results to DRM-Next code for Linux 4.12 and Mesa 17.2-dev. Read more

Void GNU/Linux Operating System Adopts Flatpak for All Supported Architectures

Void Linux, an open-source, general-purpose GNU/Linux distribution based on the monolithic Linux kernel, is the latest operating system to adopt the Flatpak application sandboxing technologies. Read more

Top 4 CDN services for hosting open source libraries

A CDN, or content delivery network, is a network of strategically placed servers located around the world used for the purpose of delivering files faster to users. A traditional CDN will allow you to accelerate your website's images, CSS files, JS files, and any other piece of static content. This allows website owners to accelerate all of their own content as well as provide them with additional features and configuration options. These premium services typically require payment based on the amount of bandwidth a project uses. Read more

Bash Bunny: Big hacks come in tiny packages

Bash Bunny is a Debian Linux computer with a USB interface designed specifically to execute payloads when plugged into a target computer. It can be used against Windows, MacOS, Linux, Unix, and Android computing devices. It features a multicolor RGB LED that indicates various statuses and a three-position selector switch: Two of the positions are used to launch payloads, while the third makes Bash Bunny appear to be a regular USB storage device for copying and modifying files. Read more