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FreeNAS 11.2-BETA1

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BSD
  • FreeNAS 11.2-BETA1

    We are pleased to announce the general availability of FreeNAS 11.2-BETA1. This initial version of the 11.2 series is considered to be feature-complete and ready for testing. Users, especially those who use Plugins, Jails, or VMs, are encouraged to update to this release in order to take advantage of the many improvements and bug fixes to those subsystems. Please report any bugs to https://redmine.ixsystems.com/projects/freenas/.

    To update to this release, select the 11.2-STABLE train in System → Update. Should you need to return to the 11.1 series after updating, reboot and select that boot environment from the boot menu.

  • FreeNAS 11.2 Beta Rolls Out With FreeBSD Bootloader, Self-Encrypting Drives

    The folks at iX Systems have announced their first public beta of FreeNAS 11.2, their downstream of FreeBSD 11.2 focused on supporting network-attached storage (NAS) systems.

What is FreeBSD? Why Should You Choose It Over Linux?

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Linux
BSD

Not too long ago I wondered if and in what situations FreeBSD could be faster than Linux and we received a good amount of informative feedback. So far, Linux rules the desktop space and FreeBSD rules the server space.

In the meantime, though, what exactly is FreeBSD? And at what times should you choose it over a GNU/Linux installation? Let’s tackle these questions.

FreeBSD is a free and open source derivative of BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) with a focus on speed, stability, security, and consistency, among other features. It has been developed and maintained by a large community ever since its initial release many years ago on November 1, 1993.

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NetBSD 8.0 Release Candidate 2

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BSD

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 8.0 RC 2, the second (and hopefully final) release candidate for the upcoming NetBSD 8.0 release.

Unfortunately the first release candidate did not hold up in our extensive testing (also know as eating our own dog food): many NetBSD.org servers/machines were updated to it and worked fine, but the auto build cluster, where we produce our binaries, did not work well. The issue was tracked down to a driver bug (Intel 10 GBit ethernet), only showing up in certain configurations, and it has been fixed now.

Other security events, like the new FPU related exploit on some Intel CPUs, caused further kernel changes, so we are not going to release NetBSD 8.0 directly, but instead provide this new release candidate for additional testing.

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Also: NetBSD 8.0 RC2 Released With Eager FPU Security Fix, Other Fixes

NetBSD Audio Improvements Are On The Way For Better Performance & Less Stuttering

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BSD

Being squared away for the NetBSD 8.1 release are audio improvements within the kernel.

The work being done by Nathanial Sloss eliminates some complexities in the existing code, stopping the copying of stream silence, caching of three blocks of audio, and more.

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Rewards of Up to $500,000 Offered for FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, Linux Zero-Days

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Security
BSD

Exploit broker Zerodium is offering rewards of up to $500,000 for zero-days in UNIX-based operating systems like OpenBSD, FreeBSD, NetBSD, but also for Linux distros such as Ubuntu, CentOS, Debian, and Tails.

The offer, first advertised via Twitter earlier this week, is available as part of the company's latest zero-day acquisition drive. Zerodium is known for buying zero-days and selling them to government agencies and law enforcement.

The company runs a regular zero-day acquisition program through its website, but it often holds special drives with more substantial rewards when it needs zero-days of a specific category.

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Is FreeBSD faster than Linux?

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Linux
BSD

FreeBSD is a free and open-source Unix-like OS that powers desktops, servers, and embedded platforms. Unlike Linux, which refers to the kernel combined with GNU to form GNU/Linux, the Operating System, FreeBSD is a complete OS with its own kernel and a focus on stability and speed, among other features.

It is not true that FreeBSD is used on only servers and there are a variety of valid reasons why users argue that it does a better job in general than Linux so you might just give it a try. Both are stable and provide an efficient working environment.

However, the general consensus is that nearly all applications run faster on Linux than FreeBSD, but FreeBSD’s TCP/IP stack has way less latency (faster response time) than Linux. This is reportedly the reason why Netflix streams its shows on FreeBSD and even pay some of its engineers to contribute to its kernel codebase.

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FreeBSD 11.2 and Workarounds

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.2 Ready For Release With Spectre Mitigation, Various Enhancements

    FreeBSD 11.2 is ready to set sail as the first significant FreeBSD update since last July's 11.1 release.

    FreeBSD 11.2-RELEASE is now available. Those wanting it right now can find it via FTP with the 11.2-RELEASE images being spun, assuming no last minute issues occur prior to the FreeBSD team officially announcing this release.

  • Workarounds To Get AMD Zen/Ryzen CPUs Running Solid On FreeBSD

    While the Linux support for AMD Ryzen/EPYC processors has been solid on Linux now largely the past number of months with just some exceptions like Raven Ridge display issues, the FreeBSD support has been a bit more choppy.

    The number of AMD Zen + FreeBSD issues has gone down in recent months when using the latest FreeBSD code, but some have still talked of stability issues that can creep up over time.

OpenBSD chief de Raadt says no easy fix for new Intel CPU bug

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Security
BSD

Recompiling is unlikely to be a catch-all solution for a recently unveiled Intel CPU vulnerability known as TLBleed, the details of which were leaked on Friday, the head of the OpenBSD project Theo de Raadt says.

The details of TLBleed, which gets its name from the fact that the flaw targets the translation lookaside buffer, a CPU cache, were leaked to the British tech site, The Register; the side-channel vulnerability can be theoretically exploited to extract encryption keys and private information from programs.

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Intel Chaos Looming?

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Hardware
BSD

OpenBSD disables hyperthreading support for Intel CPUs due to likely data leaks

Filed under
Security
BSD
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Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Existing Users Must Upgrade to 18.04

Ubuntu 17.10 reached the end of life on 19th July 2018. This means that systems running Ubuntu 17.10 won’t receive security and maintenance updates from Canonical anymore leaving them vulnerable. Read more

3 big steps toward building authentic developer communities

As more software businesses are selling open source products, we've seen a corresponding rise in the emphasis of building out developer communities around these products as a key metric for success. Happy users are passionate advocates, and these passionate advocates raise overall awareness of a company's product offerings. Attract the right vocal influencers into your community, and customers become more interested in forming a relationship with your company. Doing community building the right way, however, is a delicate balance. Undercut the needs of your user community in favor of driving sales, and your company will face a decrease in adoption and unfavorable brand awareness. Meanwhile, too little focus on the bottom line isn't good for the company. So how can this tension be balanced effectively, especially in a world in which developers are the "new kingmakers" and meeting their sensibilities is a cornerstone of driving corporate purchasing decisions? Over the past year, I've thought a lot about how to do effective community building while building the business bottom line. In this article, I'll outline three big steps to take toward building authentic, productive, sustainable developer communities. Read more Also: A 4-step plan for creating teams that aren't afraid to fail

Amid the 20th anniversary of open source, Tim O’Reilly warns that platform companies built on open-source software have lost their way

It’s rare to hear Chinese philosophy quoted on stage at a software-development conference. But O’Reilly Media founder and CEO Tim O’Reilly invoked the words of Lao Tzu Wednesday morning during the opening keynotes at OSCON 2018 in hopes of convincing those in attendance — many of whom work for the big internet platform companies of our time — that the tech industry needs to return to the spirit of openness and collaboration that drove the early days of the open-source community before it is too late. “We have an opportunity with these next generation of systems, to rebuild, to rethink the future, to discover what does it mean to get these systems right,” O’Reilly said. If the first era of the internet was dominated by open protocols, and the second era was dominated by the rise of huge platform companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook, the third era we’re about to enter presents a chance to get it right again. Read more