Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSD

An Insight into the Future of TrueOS BSD and Project Trident

Filed under
BSD

Last month, TrueOS announced that they would be spinning off their desktop offering. The team behind the new project, named Project Trident, have been working furiously towards their first release. They did take a few minutes to answer some of our question about Project Trident and TrueOS. I would like to thank JT and Ken for taking the time to compile these answers.

Read more

Also:July/August 2018 Issue of the FreeBSD Journal Now Available

FreeBSD 12.0 Alpha Hits The Web

Filed under
BSD

The first alpha release of FreeBSD 12.0 was quietly uploaded a few days ago to the project's download servers as the first step to shipping this next major update to the FreeBSD operating system.

FreeBSD 12.0-ALPHA1 was successfully made back on 10 August as what begins the project's "code slush" period whereby new commits can continue being merged for 12.0 but they shouldn't be introducing new features. The actual code freeze is what's beginning later this month followed by the code branching and then the beta releases start towards the end of September.

Read more

Also: Badness, Enumerated by Robots

Review: NomadBSD 1.1

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

One of the most recent additions to the DistroWatch database is NomadBSD. According to the NomadBSD website: "NomadBSD is a 64-bit live system for USB flash drives, based on FreeBSD. Together with automatic hardware detection and setup, it is configured to be used as a desktop system that works out of the box, but can also be used for data recovery."

The latest release of NomadBSD (or simply "Nomad", as I will refer to the project in this review) is version 1.1. It is based on FreeBSD 11.2 and is offered in two builds, one for generic personal computers and one for Macbooks. The release announcement mentions version 1.1 offers improved video driver support for Intel and AMD cards. The operating system ships with Octopkg for graphical package management and the system should automatically detect, and work with, VirtualBox environments.

Nomad 1.1 is available as a 2GB download, which we then decompress to produce a 4GB file which can be written to a USB thumb drive. There is no optical media build of Nomad as it is designed to be run entirely from the USB drive, and write data persistently to the drive, rather than simply being installed from the USB media.

Read more

Also: Happy Bob's Libtls tutorial

BSD: OpenSSH 7.8, mandoc, nbdkit

Filed under
BSD

6 Reasons Why Linux Users Switch to BSD

Filed under
BSD

Wonder why people use BSD? Read some of the main reasons that compel people to use BSD over Linux.
Read more

6 Reasons Why Linux Users Switch to BSD

Filed under
BSD

Thus far I have written several articles about BSD for It’s FOSS. There is always at least one person in the comments asking “Why bother with BSD?” I figure that the best way to respond was to write an article on the topic.

Read more

Also: LibreSSL 2.8.0 Released

FreeBSD has its own TCP-queue-of-death bug, easier to hose than Linux's SegmentSmack

Filed under
Security
BSD

Hard on the heels of the Linux kernel's packets-of-death attack dubbed SegmentSmack, a similar vulnerability has been disclosed and fixed in FreeBSD.

Attributed to SegmentSmack discoverer Juha-Matti Tilli of Aalto University in Finland, the FreeBSD TCP issue is related to how the operating system's networking stack reassembles segmented packets. Much in the same way Linux kernel versions 4.9 and higher can be brought down by bad network traffic, a sequence of maliciously crafted packets can also crash FreeBSD machines.

FreeBSD 10, 10.4, 11, 11.1, and 11.2 are affected, and the maintainers have released patches to mitigate the programming cockup. In the open-source operating system project's advisory for CVE-2018-6922 (Linux's SegmentSmack was assigned CVE-2018-5390), the problem was this week described as an “inefficient algorithm” involving a segment reassembly data structure.

Read more

BSD: FreeBSD, zpool and OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • zpool checkpoints

     

    In March, to FreeBSD landed a very interesting feature called 'zpool checkpoints'. Before we jump straight into the topic, let's take a step back and look at another ZFS feature called ‘snapshot’. Snapshot allows us to create an image of our single file systems. This gives us the option to modify data on the dataset without the fear of losing some data.

  • Reflection on one-year usage of OpenBSD

     

    I have used OpenBSD for more than one year, and it is time to give a summary of the experience...

  • OpenBSD on an iBook G4 [iophk: "it was a sweet machine in its time"]

     

    In summary I was impressed with OpenBSD and its ability to breathe new life into this old Apple Mac. I'm genuinely excited about the idea of trying BSD with other devices on my network such as an old Asus Eee PC 900 netbook and at least one of the many Raspberry Pi devices I use. Whether I go the whole hog and replace Fedora on my main production laptop though remains to be seen!

  •  

BSD: LLVM/Clang 7.0 and FreeBSD Update

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM / Clang 7.0 Branching Today, Releasing In September

    Not only is Mesa 18.2 ending feature development today to begin their release candidates, but LLVM 7.0 and its sub-projects like Clang 7.0 also happens to have aligned with a similar release schedule.

    LLVM 7.0 and its sub-projects were just branched in Git/SVN and preparations have begun for pushing out the first release candidate. At least a second release candidate will follow later in August before they are planning to officially release LLVM 7.0.0 on or around 5 September.

  • FreeBSD: July 2018 Development Projects Update

     

    To address this, under sponsorship from the FreeBSD Foundation, I am implementing in-kernel microcode loading. The aim is to apply microcode updates as one of the first stages in the kernel’s boot-up process. In particular, since microcode updates may enable new CPU features such as IBRS, it is desirable to ensure that updates are applied before the kernel enumerates these features. As part of this feature, the kernel will automatically re-apply any existing microcode update on each CPU upon resume, so only minimal portions of the kernel may ever execute without an update applied.

OPNsense 18.7 Released For FreeBSD 11 Powered Routers / Firewalls

Filed under
BSD

While OpenWRT 18.06 was released today as the popular Linux-based networking/embedded distribution, for those preferring FreeBSD, the OPNsense 18.7 release is also shipping today.

Read more

Also: OPNsense 18.7 released

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines