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BSD

DragonFly BSD 5.0 Operating System Debuts Next-Generation HAMMER2 File System

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BSD

More than six months after the release of the 4.8 series, the BSD-derived DragonFly BSD operating system has been updated today to version 5.0, a major new stable series that introduces new features and numerous improvements.

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also: DragonFlyBSD 5.0 Released With Initial HAMMER2 Support, Support For 900k+ Processes

Development: Gtk4, GNOME Foundation, Coda, AutoML, LLVM

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Development
GNOME
BSD
  • Modern Text Editor Design

    .

    Gtk4 development is heating up, and we are starting to see a toolkit built like a game engine. That’s pretty cool. But how will that change how we write editors? Should it?

    In the Gtk3 cycle, I added support to GtkTextView that would render using Alex’s GtkPixelCache. It helped us amortize the cost of rendering into mostly just an XCopyArea() when drawing a frame. It’s why we have that nice 60fps two-finger-scrolling.

  • Policy hacking

    The hackfest was part of an effort to redefine how the GNOME Foundation operates and is perceived.

    [...]

    Until now, the board has largely operated in an executive mode: each meeting we decide on funding requests, trademark questions and whatever other miscellaneous issues come our way. While some of this decision-making responsibility is to be expected, it is also fair to say that the board spends too much time on small questions and not enough on bigger ones.

  • Coda revival

    Coda is a distributed file system developed as a research project at Carnegie Mellon University, descended from a older version of the Andrew File System. It got dropped from FreeBSD some five years ago, due to not having been adopted for a MPSAFE world. The focus for this current project is to bring it back into sufficiently workable shape that it could return to the kernel. It is currently in a working condition. Work is underway to test it better, fix whatever issues are found, and commit it to 12-CURRENT.

  • Google's Learning Software Learns to Write Learning Software

    In a project called AutoML, Google’s researchers have taught machine-learning software to build machine-learning software. In some instances, what it comes up with is more powerful and efficient than the best systems the researchers themselves can design. Google says the system recently scored a record 82 percent at categorizing images by their content. On the harder task of marking the location of multiple objects in an image, an important task for augmented reality and autonomous robots, the auto-generated system scored 43 percent. The best human-built system scored 39 percent.

  • Intel Begins Working On "Knights Mill" Support For LLVM/Clang

    Intel compiler engineers have begun mainlining "Knights Mill" enablement within the LLVM compiler stack.

    Knights Mill is the codename for an upcoming Xeon Phi expected for release later this quarter. Details on Knights Mill are relatively light but it will cater to deep learning / AI use-cases and more efficient than Knights Landing (KNL).

    Intel has previously said Knights Mill is capable of twice the performance of Knights Landing for floating point operations per cycle and there are also new/optimized instructions for 8-bit and 16-bit arithmetic.

pfSense 2.4.0-RELEASE Now Available!

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Security
BSD

We are excited to announce the release of pfSense® software version 2.4, now available for new installations and upgrades!

pfSense software version 2.4.0 was a herculean effort! It is the culmination of 18 months of hard work by Netgate and community contributors, with over 290 items resolved. According to git, 671 files were changed with a total 1651680 lines added, and 185727 lines deleted. Most of those added lines are from translated strings for multiple language support!

pfSense 2.4.0-RELEASE updates and installation images are available now!

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Also: pfSense 2.4 Released, Rebased To FreeBSD 11.1 & New Installer

More on Release of OpenBSD 6.2

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BSD
  • Security-Oriented OpenBSD 6.2 OS Released with Better ARM Support, Improvements

    The BSD-based, UNIX-like operating system OpenBSD has been recently updated to version 6.2, a release that introduces up-to-date components, better hardware support, and lots of security improvements.

    Coming six months after the launch of OpenBSD 6.1 early this spring, which was the first point release in the 6.x series of the operating system, OpenBSD 6.2 is here to introduce a large number of enhancements, among which we can mention better support for various ARM boards, IEEE 802.11 wireless stack improvements, as well as some generic network stack improvements.

  • OpenBSD 6.2 released: Oct 9, 2017

     

    We are pleased to announce the official release of OpenBSD 6.2.  This is our 43rd release.  We remain proud of OpenBSD's record of more than twenty years with only two remote holes in the default install.  

  • OpenBSD 6.2 Released

     

    A few days ahead of the date hinted at by the work-in-progress release page, OpenBSD 6.2 was released today, October 9th 2017.

OpenBSD 6.2 Released Early

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BSD

BSD: OpenBSD 6.2 Out a Week From Now

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BSD

BSD: FreeBSD 10.4, LibertyBSD 6.1, OpenSSH 7.6

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BSD
  • FreeBSD gains eMMC support so … errr … watch out, Android

    Version 10.4 of FreeBSD has landed, with the headline feature being support for eMMC.

    For those of you still short of your best after nocturnal chemical exertions, eMMC – aka Embedded Multimedia Card – packs some flash memory and a controller into a single package. That arrangement is handy for manufacturers of personal electronics.

  • LibertyBSD 6.1 Released As A "Deblobbed" Version Of OpenBSD

    LibertyBSD 6.1 is now available as a deblobbed version of OpenBSD.

    LibertyBSD is a downstream of OpenBSD that focuses on only distributing free software. OpenBSD ships with non-free, binary-only firmware like Linux, but LibertyBSD strips away those binary-only bits, similar to the Linux-libre downstream kernel.

  • OpenSSH 7.6 has just been released.

OpenSSH 7.6 and FreeBSD 10.4

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Software
Security
BSD

FreeBSD 10.4 Released With Full Support For eMMC Storage

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BSD

The latest release in the FreeBSD 10 series is now available with some work backported from FreeBSD 11 and other improvements/fixes.

FreeBSD 10.4 happens to be the operating system's first release with full support for eMMC storage. FreeBSD 10.4 also has improvements to its AES-NI driver, better Intel Kabylake device support, em networking driver improvements, various Wake-On-LAN (WoL) improvements to different drivers, updated firmware/microcode files, and more.

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DragonFlyBSD 5.0 Branched As The Next Release

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BSD

We've known a new DragonFlyBSD release was being worked on for release soon. That release has now been branched, the first release candidate tagged, and it's being marked as version 5.0.

Succeeding DragonFlyBSD 4.8 will be DragonFlyBSD 5.0. 5.0.0-rc1 was tagged on Friday night while the code is branched for the 5.0 release undertaking. On Git master is now the DragonFly 5.1 development version.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.